Tubes Sealing a leaking tube inside of a tire

   #1  

WilliamTO-35

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1955 Ferguson TO-35
I put new rear tires with tubes on my Ferguson TO-35 about 6 years ago. The tires are 12.4-28 , and have very little wear on the lugs. However, yesterday I noticed some of the RV antifreeze ( Propylene Glycol) I had filled them with leaking out of one of the many small and narrow " surface cracks" on the sidewall. Obviously, the inner tube has a leak in it ( they invariably leak, eventually) . I don't use the tractor much , and I really hate to have to replace the tire and tube so soon. I've used " Slime" sealant in smaller tires with success, but even if I pump out all of the antifreeze ballast , a leak sealer might not work because of the antifreeze coating inside of the tube. I've heard of people using things like oatmeal to seal cooling system leaks in engines. Is there anything I can try that will go through the valve stem that might seal the inner tube , and then allow me to refill the tube with the ballast liquid ? I can't hurt anything, since the alternative is a new tire and tube.
Thanks !
 
   #2  

Scook222

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If the surface cracks are deep enough to pinch the tube, the tube will have to be patched and a boot put in the tire. I would personally want to know how bad the tire is leaking before I tried to fix it. Check the pressure in the tire for a few days and see if it drops. If you had someone mount and fill the tires for you, it could be dish soap or antifreeze that was trapped between the tire, rim, and rim and the tires have just now cracked enough to let it out. Do you have to have to tires loaded? It would probably be really expensive to fill the tire with slime or a similar type sealer but that should give you some ballast. Depending on how much antifreeze and which type it was put in the tires, it might not be enough residue to affect the slime.
 
   #3  

goeduck

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As a side point, if you have dogs or cats, they are attracted to antifreeze and even small amounts of it can be fatal. In your case they could lick it off the tires.
 
   #4  

fried1765

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As a side point, if you have dogs or cats, they are attracted to antifreeze and even small amounts of it can be fatal. In your case they could lick it off the tires.

SIMPLY NOT TRUE!
The OP states that he used "RV antifreeze", which is propylene glycol.
RV antifreeze is NOT TOXIC to animals or humans!
Propylene glycol is actually used in some foods and medications.

ETHYLENE glycol (automotive anti-freeze) is VERY toxic!
Animals are attracted to ETHYLENE glycol because of it's sweet taste.
Please do not equate these two types of anti-freeze.
 
Last edited:
   #5  

goeduck

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SIMPLY NOT TRUE!
The OP states that he used "RV antifreeze", which is propylene glycol.
RV antifreeze is NOT TOXIC to animals or humans!
Propylene glycol is actually used in some foods and medications.

ETHYLENE glycol (automotive anti-freeze) is VERY toxic!
Animals are attracted to ETHYLENE glycol because of it's sweet taste.
Please do not equate these two types of anti-freeze.

I guess I stand partially corrected. Good to know but I still would not want my dogs licking the tires. :thumbdown:

This links says propylene glycol is LESS poisonous,
Propylene Glycol | Pet Poison Helpline
 
   #6  

Texasmark

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You can take the tire to a tire shop and they can put a "boot patch" over the crack in the tire and hot patch the tube and you can be on your way. Maybe 50 bucks. They have tanks and pumps and pump your fluid out, effect the repair, and pump it back in.

Upon purchasing the 3910 I had a slow leak in a 13.6x28 and found it to be in a sidewall, mid way between the tread and rim....a thorn puncture. I rolled the tire till the hole was above the liquid level and using a lot of glue and sopping the tube/tire thoroughly before inserting the tubeless type plug it has held so far....going on a year now. The only reason it held I think, is over time, tubes vulcanize to a degree to the inside of the tire (TT in this case) so it was liken to patching a tubeless tire with a tubeless patch.
 
   #7  

fried1765

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I guess I stand partially corrected. Good to know but I still would not want my dogs licking the tires. :thumbdown:

This links says propylene glycol is LESS poisonous,
Propylene Glycol | Pet Poison Helpline

If you had an RV, and used RV antifreeze in your drinking water system, (as most do) would you never again use the on board RV water to brush your teeth ?
 
   #8  

Ford850

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The problem with using RV antifreeze in tires is that there are 2 types and most of us will buy the cheapest available. That’s usually ethanol based RV antifreeze. Ethanol can damage rubber.
 
   #9  

fried1765

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The problem with using RV antifreeze in tires is that there are 2 types and most of us will buy the cheapest available. That’s usually ethanol based RV antifreeze. Ethanol can damage rubber.

"Ethanol can damage rubber"
Why do we use ethylene glycol in our automobile cooling systems with rubber hoses?
 
   #10  

zzvyb6

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"Ethanol can damage rubber"
Why do we use ethylene glycol in our automobile cooling systems with rubber hoses?

Because the 'rubber' radiator hoses are not 'rubber'. May I point out that older Stihl power products (and many other brands) have "rubber' o-rings and hoses and they fail because of the ethanol in gasoline people use these days. New, replacement seals are not "rubber".
 
 
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