Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere

   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #1  

KennedyDiesel

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I've seen in some older threads where some members here had the 351 and then upgraded to the 501. I'm looking to make the right choice the first time. At 44HP engine (35 PTO) I should be able to hande the 501, but I don't want to overdo it. Nor do I want to do the 351 and regret buying too small. From what I can see my primary concern is the winch pulling the tractor over so if I can get by with the 351 it may be the best choice.The weight of the 501 would help ballast if I were to carry a log(s) on the loader.

I should add that I am smart enough to know the capabilities of my equipment and how close to or past the rated capabilities I can go.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #2  
The 351 is plenty of winch for your tractor. I have a 351 Farmi winch and use it on a John Deere 4700 and a McCormick C80L. It is quite powerful. Based on my use on tractors which are larger than yours, IMHO the 501 would be more winch than you could use on a 3720.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #3  
The 351 is plenty of winch for your tractor. I have a 351 Farmi winch and use it on a John Deere 4700 and a McCormick C80L. It is quite powerful. Based on my use on tractors which are larger than yours, IMHO the 501 would be more winch than you could use on a 3720.

Agreed. (I run a 601 on a 100HP Hesston). A 501 would likely have the ability to stall a 35 HP pto.

BTW, the whole issue of "pulling the tractor over" is ALL about technique, including using a lanyard of proper length such that the operator is out beyond the rear wheel of the tractor.


There are rare circumstances when it is even remotely safe to set up a pull from any direction except the tractor's "6", IE directly behind the tractor.

Move the tractor, before you are tempted to do any pull that is beyond your 5 or 7.......... Really.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #4  
I agree with the others. The 351 is the best match for your tractor. Farmi lists 40 hp as the minimum required for the 501. You would have way more winch than your tractor could turn. You want your tractor to have enough torque to use the winches entire capability. You wont hurt it. There is not much that the 7700 lbs wont pull that you would be able to skid out with your tractor. If you did need more pull or less leverage on the tractor use a snatch block.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #5  
I also agree with all the others. I have a 501 and am pretty certain you would not be happy having it on a 3720 series tractor. Stick with the 351 it is plenty of winch and will do you very well.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere
  • Thread Starter
#6  
Thanks for the info guys. Looks like the 351 is the clear concensus.

Anybody had any luck/experience getting this unit to connect with an Imatch or similar device?

I think the lower spacing is correct, but the top link connect is WAY high from what I can see.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere
  • Thread Starter
#7  
Agreed. (I run a 601 on a 100HP Hesston). A 501 would likely have the ability to stall a 35 HP pto.

BTW, the whole issue of "pulling the tractor over" is ALL about technique, including using a lanyard of proper length such that the operator is out beyond the rear wheel of the tractor.


There are rare circumstances when it is even remotely safe to set up a pull from any direction except the tractor's "6", IE directly behind the tractor.

Move the tractor, before you are tempted to do any pull that is beyond your 5 or 7.......... Really.

Understood

So thought is to pull trees that are 90ー to my trails by attaching a snatch block to a solid anchor point (tree) that is alongside my trail. The tractor would be pulling directly rearward, and the cable would then cross my trail to the log. In most cases I could turn the tractor across the trail, but then I would only get the log to the edge of the trail. With the pulley system I could winch it across, chunk it and pull more across the trail again.


How often does a guy pull direct off the upper pulley and how often would you go upper to lower to get additional downforce?

I should add that my trails are looped together so I can always get out except for a couple of dead ends that I'd have to back into.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #8  
Understood

So thought is to pull trees that are 90ー to my trails by attaching a snatch block to a solid anchor point (tree) that is alongside my trail. The tractor would be pulling directly rearward, and the cable would then cross my trail to the log. In most cases I could turn the tractor across the trail, but then I would only get the log to the edge of the trail. With the pulley system I could winch it across, chunk it and pull more across the trail again.


How often does a guy pull direct off the upper pulley and how often would you go upper to lower to get additional downforce?

I should add that my trails are looped together so I can always get out except for a couple of dead ends that I'd have to back into.

It is always better to loop the cable through the lower pully. Think about the physics involved. By using the lower pully, you do several things: 1: You transfer much of the pulling stress off of the top link and transfer the force to the feet of the skidder and lower links of the TPH. 2: This substantially lowers the center of gravity of the pulling forces and allows the "dozer blade" base of the skidder to dig in, rather than simply pulling the tractor backwards.
3: if you ARE pulling at a slight angle, using the lower pully tends to nulify the leverage, the lower the pully is set on the frame.

I wont say I always loop around the snatch block, but I do for any "heavy" pull and especially any pull where I cannot always see the material being winched.

Having made the last statement, I have found that, while not necessarily instinctual, it is a an excellent practice when winching loge to watch the cable as it is pulled through the upper block. You will get hang ups, and when you do, if you are trying to watch the material being winched, you will not be watching the tractor, winch and cable movement. THAT can be dangerous.

So I have taught myself to watch the cable at the top block with one eye and the rear wheel of the tractor (the one I am standing next to) with the other eye, at least until the material is within a few feet of where I want it.

Have a good time. I think of all the implements I have my skidding winch is the tool I enjoy working with the most.
 
   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #9  
My Farmi 290 only has a top pulley. It will pull 6500 LBS. My tractor w/ loader, filled tires, and winch weighs 5000 LBS. A smaller rig than yours for sure. I have never wished that I had a lower pulley. This is not to say that if I had one I wouldn't use it. I think you will get a sense of which one to use as you gain experience. Many times pulling from above helps especially when the log gets in close. I would use both. Start with smaller stuff. Stop before you get snagged, walk out and roll the log away from the snag or put in a snatch block to pull the tree clearof the snag then continue.
To me the most important things are the cable angle and as DeadHorse said watching the cable. Its speed and tension. When you get snagged you can see the cable tension increase well before the tractor gets yanked around. This gives you more reaction time. The other thing is to keep your RPMs low. I run mine 1200 to 1500. 1800 at the absolute most.

gg
 
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   / Sizing Farmi skidding winch for my 3720 Deere #10  
I agree on the speed and should have mentioned it in my earlier post, as it is THAT important.

My Hesston (100hp) develops its peak torque at 1500 rpm. I never run it faster than that when winching, and often times I run it slower.

Old farmer once told me "the fastest way to move something big and heavy, is slowly"....... He was right as best as my experience has taught me.

Re the lower pully: when the farmi is outfitted with it, you use them both at the same time in series. IE the cable comes off the upper block and you run it through the lower one, which is a snatch block. Obviously, if you don't have a lower one, you only use the top pully.

The weight of the tractor is less important than the ability of the tractor to stay "planted". The rear foot of the larger Farmi winches have a dozer blade. When setting up for a pull, I set the winch on the ground and back into the blade just a tad. Then I roll the FEL bucket forward and plant it firmly on the ground, finally setting the transmission brake on the tractor. It also helps to have the tractor in 4wd as that is the ONLY way a tractor has "front wheel brakes".

A slow pull is more than fast enough.............:D
 
 
 
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