Sometimes it's worth it to hire a land surveyor

   #1  

Jstpssng

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I work for a forest management company with land all over the northern half of Maine. This includes several thousand miles of property lines varying from newly spotted and painted to non-existent. I consider myself pretty good about finding old lines and knowing when they are in the right place... I won't honor an old line if I'm not confident it's right.

A couple of months ago an abutter contacted us and said that he didn't feel our line was in the right place. The forester in charge went out and visited him but it appeared he was basing his opinion merely on the tax maps... which are notoriously inaccurate. Still, we agreed to cost share a survey before we ever planned harvest activity. Recently I was reading deeds while helping decide if another tract in that same town needed a survey (it does) and started perusing his. It took me several days of reading until my eyes crossed as there were so many problems with his description; his land had been sold several times in the last 80 years there were originally 3 different parcels combined to one; and every time a transfer was done a bit more was left out of the description. Finally though I realised that what he was saying was right and went out for a site visit in hopes of a quick remedy. (I even brought my axe and paint.) As soon as I saw the post we called our corner I realised that I need to call in the cavalry- AKA a licensed surveyor. That shade of orange paint hasn't even been made in almost 50 years; it's been that long since the lines were right. It wouldn't surprise me if they've been wrong since the original lot was carved out just after WWII. We had no way of knowing, as we were just going by old, vintage evidence.

Everybody can tell you where your lines are; your neighbor, the previous owner, the realtor; yet if you aren't proficient at reading deeds, a good surveyor is the best person to talk to.
 
   #2  

Hay Dude

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I work for a forest management company with land all over the northern half of Maine. This includes several thousand miles of property lines varying from newly spotted and painted to non-existent. I consider myself pretty good about finding old lines and knowing when they are in the right place... I won't honor an old line if I'm not confident it's right.

A couple of months ago an abutter contacted us and said that he didn't feel our line was in the right place. The forester in charge went out and visited him but it appeared he was basing his opinion merely on the tax maps... which are notoriously inaccurate. Still, we agreed to cost share a survey before we ever planned harvest activity. Recently I was reading deeds while helping decide if another tract in that same town needed a survey (it does) and started perusing his. It took me several days of reading until my eyes crossed as there were so many problems with his description; his land had been sold several times in the last 80 years there were originally 3 different parcels combined to one; and every time a transfer was done a bit more was left out of the description. Finally though I realised that what he was saying was right and went out for a site visit in hopes of a quick remedy. (I even brought my axe and paint.) As soon as I saw the post we called our corner I realised that I need to call in the cavalry- AKA a licensed surveyor. That shade of orange paint hasn't even been made in almost 50 years; it's been that long since the lines were right. It wouldn't surprise me if they've been wrong since the original lot was carved out just after WWII. We had no way of knowing, as we were just going by old, vintage evidence.

Everybody can tell you where your lines are; your neighbor, the previous owner, the realtor; yet if you aren't proficient at reading deeds, a good surveyor is the best person to talk to.
Related, but in a much smaller scale:
My wonderful “I have arrived” neighbor who moved next door about 5 years ago keeps conveniently cleaving off my property and landscaping it to his hearts delight. My favorite touches of theirs is the old “plant bushes with mulch beds in my lawn” technique, followed closely by the “plant bamboo 10’ from my driveway and let it bend over onto my cars when it snows” technique.
Man I need a surveyor
 
   #3  

oosik

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Out here most all property surveys were by a government surveyor. Meets/bounds survey to establish a homestead. The survey on my 80 acres was done in 1892 and is a one page, verbal, meets/bounds description. It's a simple rectangle - 1320 x 2640.

My father bought the property, for cash, in 1939. He was able to find the four corners - no bank was involved - no need for a survey.

However - if I ever sold and a bank was involved - I'm sure a current survey might be required.

Over the years, three of my four property corners have been confirmed by modern surveys. Land sales of adjoining properties. The forth corner is smack, dab in the middle of a big lake. I don't care about that corner.
 
   #4  

fried1765

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Related, but in a much smaller scale:
My wonderful “I have arrived” neighbor who moved next door about 5 years ago keeps conveniently cleaving off my property and landscaping it to his hearts delight. My favorite touches of theirs is the old “plant bushes with mulch beds in my lawn” technique, followed closely by the “plant bamboo 10’ from my driveway and let it bend over onto my cars when it snows” technique.
Man I need a surveyor
Glyphosate sprayed, will take care of the bamboo issue!
 
   #5  

oosik

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Man, am I ever glad to be out in the country. My closest neighbor - miles away. The only thing that ever "violates" my barbed wire fence line - the neighbors spring calves. Mama always brings them back with gentle calling.
 
   #6  

MoKelly

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Related, but in a much smaller scale:
My wonderful “I have arrived” neighbor who moved next door about 5 years ago keeps conveniently cleaving off my property and landscaping it to his hearts delight. My favorite touches of theirs is the old “plant bushes with mulch beds in my lawn” technique, followed closely by the “plant bamboo 10’ from my driveway and let it bend over onto my cars when it snows” technique.
Man I need a surveyor

Tree limbs growing over a neighbors property tend to usually cause issues.

As I understand the rules, if the limbs are over your property, you have the right to cut. However, the neighbors can/will get upset and claim your cuts damaged their trees.

My Dad had issues with neighbors and their large trees with dead branches over his fence and shed.

Sure enough, one storm came and the dead branch broke damaging the fence and shed.

The insurance companies fought it out and covered the damages.

MoKelly
 
  
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Jstpssng

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By "Bamboo" do you mean Japanese Knotweed?Japanese Knotweed That's nasty stuff if it gets established. You can pour a concrete slab over it, and still have shoots grow out from underneath. It was planted as an ornamental for years and is almost impossible to get rid of, short of scorched earth chemical treatments.
 
   #8  

Hay Dude

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Man, am I ever glad to be out in the country. My closest neighbor - miles away. The only thing that ever "violates" my barbed wire fence line - the neighbors spring calves. Mama always brings them back with gentle calling.
Oosik, I AM in the country.
I only hve one close by neighbor and it’s this jackass piker. Rest of my neighbors are great.
 
   #9  

California

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Here's an old thread nearly identical to this one. My post shows a newspaper delivery tube that I nailed to a tree across the ravine. It's a 'witness monument' above a corner stake that had just been placed by a pro surveyor. I intended it to be visible from our side so I could point it out to my family.

Grandma of that clan had just had a survey done as part of her estate planning, to clarify her intended inheritances of various parcels over there.

What I didn't post in that old thread was that a week after I climbed through the poison oak jungle in the ravine to nail that newspaper tube to the tree, I met the Black Sheep grandson of the clan over there. He insisted the property line was the stream in the bottom of the ravine and the far slope was his to run his 4-wheeler on. He insisted that my newspaper tube monument was down at the creek so the far slope was his. I discovered he had moved my monument within a week after I placed it.

I phoned the surveyor for verification then went and painted a 16 inch tall white band around the tree over there where my newspaper tube had been. After I described the grandson's dishonest act, and argument, to another neighbor, word got back to Grandma and he quit riding his 4-wheeler in my ravine. Several years later he was found dead in bed and everyone said they were sure that was from his drug habit. Everyone remaining in that clan is good decent folks, good neighbors.


And a little farther down in that thread. A story I wrote about someone who sued the state over a property line issue and I was sent to hear his argument. The conclusion I wrote up was he had no loss, therefore his claim was pointless. I don't think he prevailed.

Actually that entire thread is interesting, for anyone interested in property surveys.
 
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fried1765

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OK, I give up. Whats a piker?
It is an old descriptive term that seems to be only used in the Northeast US.
I'll let Hay Dude explain.
 

oosik

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I have a neighbor - lives a little over five miles away. His property abuts mine on the north. He, at times, can be a PITA. Like me, he is old, but he has a son to maintain his lands.

His son is a really fine fellow. I get along with the son very well.
 

Hay Dude

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OK, I give up. Whats a piker?

piker​

[ pahy-ker ]SHOW IPA

See synonyms for piker on Thesaurus.com

noun Informal.
a person who does anything in a contemptibly small or cheap way.
a stingy, tight-fisted person; tightwad.
a person who gambles, speculates, etc., in a small, cautious way.


The way we use it is in describing a guy who thinks he’s a “player”.
 

dodge man

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I am a mostly retired land surveyor and like the OP’s post. I like where he describes reading deeds and the time it takes. I also have spent time reading deeds that have problems. Typos are not that uncommon when property is transferred and reading old deeds can clarify the typo.

An important point to understand is there is not always a “correct” answer. Say you could get 10 surveyors to survey something that has one missing corner. If it’s very simple they would all put the corner in the same place. If it’s very complicated there might be a large circle that would be made by all the pins they set.
 

fried1765

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I have a neighbor - lives a little over five miles away. His property abuts mine on the north. He, at times, can be a PITA. Like me, he is old, but he has a son to maintain his lands.

His son is a really fine fellow. I get along with the son very well.
Us older folks can ALL be a PITA to others at times!
We tend to not tolerate tomfoolery.
 
Last edited:

Oaktree

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Everybody can tell you where your lines are; your neighbor, the previous owner, the realtor; yet if you aren't proficient at reading deeds, a good surveyor is the best person to talk to.
I can only imagine the joy in surveying property lines in parcels the size of the ones you deal with, especially here in New England where distances are listed in rods, and corners indicated by "the old oak tree", lot size in acres "more or less", etc.
My wonderful “I have arrived” neighbor who moved next door about 5 years ago keeps conveniently cleaving off my property and landscaping it to his hearts delight. My favorite touches of theirs is the old “plant bushes with mulch beds in my lawn” technique, followed closely by the “plant bamboo 10’ from my driveway and let it bend over onto my cars when it snows” technique.
Man I need a surveyor
Yeah, something you ought to deal with sooner than later before this neighbor tries to claim the property thru adverse possession/squatter's rights. If nothing else, the longer you let things go the deeper precedent you set.
 

California

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If nothing else, the longer you let things go the deeper precedent you set.
Yeah. Thinking that way - that's why I immediately went over and painted a 16" high white band all the way around the tree at the surveyor's corner stake after I learned the kid over there had moved my witness monument. (Post #9, above).

Now the corner was unmistakably visible from their side, as well as mine.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
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Jstpssng

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Here's an old thread nearly identical to this one. My post shows a newspaper delivery tube that I nailed to a tree across the ravine. It's a 'witness monument' above a corner stake that had just been placed by a pro surveyor. I intended it to be visible from our side so I could point it out to my family.

Grandma of that clan had just had a survey done as part of her estate planning, to clarify her intended inheritances of various parcels over there.

What I didn't post in that old thread was that a week after I climbed through the poison oak jungle in the ravine to nail that newspaper tube to the tree, I met the Black Sheep grandson of the clan over there. He insisted the property line was the stream in the bottom of the ravine and the far slope was his to run his 4-wheeler on. He insisted that my newspaper tube monument was down at the creek so the far slope was his. I discovered he had moved my monument within a week after I placed it.

I phoned the surveyor for verification then went and painted a 16 inch tall white band around the tree over there where my newspaper tube had been. After I described the grandson's dishonest act, and argument, to another neighbor, word got back to Grandma and he quit riding his 4-wheeler in my ravine. Several years later he was found dead in bed and everyone said they were sure that was from his drug habit. Everyone remaining in that clan is good decent folks, good neighbors.


And a little farther down in that thread. A story I wrote about someone who sued the state over a property line issue and I was sent to hear his argument. The conclusion I wrote up was he had no loss, therefore his claim was pointless. I don't think he prevailed.

Actually that entire thread is interesting, for anyone interested in property surveys.
To paraphrase Charles Holland Duell; "This just goes to show that everything that can be posted already has been posted." :D
 

VroomVroom

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I am very nervous of my situation. distances weren’t adding up after buying my lot two miles down a dirt road. The surveyors came and the corner on the intersection is actually in the center of the roadway. It is a dirt road. The lot was treed and during the course of the last 5 years I cleared the lot enough to install the driveway, build a house/garage. I piled my wood down there, trailer, tractor etc as often I could not turn or needed space for cement-trucks further up the driveway etc. I had to put a pickup load of wood down on the corner, which was on the edge of the road way but maybe 6-8 feet from one side of my boundary and maybe 25 feet inside my other boundary being on a corner. They sent me an email last summer and said someone was having issues with wood but at a different lot number. a Lot that doesn’t exist in there. My thoughts were, well you should find out what lot their really talking about and if it is mine I can accommodate . But I didn’t. I just said any wood I had was inside my boundary’s and that I wasn’t planning to leave it there over the winter. This was in the summer. The next morning I go out there and they bull dozed it into the ditch. I was planning to put a street lamp at least out A little further to prevent more migration of the turn. However yesterday they spread recycled asphalt around the turn It use to be a logging road turned cottAge area. The logging company had a “right of way” designated for a the Road and is exceptionally wide. I’m thinking 60 feet or more. Yet the road which is approx 30 feet wide leaves the right of way and crosses my corner. My survey clearly shows the narrow road, leave the wide right of way on paper. I also showed this to the husband of the recently elected president of the road association last year. He assumed it was half the road on my lot, half the road on the other lot across from me. But I showed him that no, it’s a right of way that separates me from the guy across the lot and at that corner it’s exceptionally wide. Despite the road only being 30 feet or so.
 

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CalG

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Just to add to the misery..

My little parcel is laid out Meets and bounds on three sides. but the north side line is a compass direction.

It was laid with a compass. and all the declination add on's associated.

The town map / deed map. uses "true North, not magnetic North.

There are a couple of lillies planted at each end of the line to mark the line my neighbor John and I have agreed on. ;-)

Won't hold in a court of law, but works for us!

ps

I sat as selectman in our small town for two terms. Land and lines can be a big division between friends, family and neighbors.
 

two_bit_score

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I get a survey in my name on everything I buy and make it a contingent in the contract that I must be satisfied with the survey.

The only parcel that doesn’t have a survey done at the time I acquired the property is the “old home place”. That was last surveyed in the 1920’s.

I did learn from the mistakes of others. Doesn’t mean I won’t have a problem somewhere, sometime. Just, hopefully, lessens the risk.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#23  
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Jstpssng

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In cases where there are going to be improvements- especially buildings- anyplace near the lines I wouldn't even consider proceeding without good monumentation. My cousin had an abutter drill a well on his side of the line. He only has 4 acres, they have less than that.
I know of a case in South Portland years ago where they were building a McMansion and when it came time to refinance to pay off the construction loan, the mortgage inspection determined that the house was 11 inches too close to the property line. They applied for a variance but one of the abutter's wouldn't sign off on it so they had to move the building. When working close tolerances like that it would be cheap money to have the foundation laid out by a pro.
 

RalphVa

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We're good on the right. That neighbor is a naked gardener like me. We know the liine +/- 10 feet. That's the easement for maintenance anyway.

Neighbor to the left is a pissant territorial rat. Had stakes put in about every 75 to 100 ft down the line. Neighbor on the other side removed them! I planted shrubs on my side of the stakes. Asked him whether he wanted me to mow for the Jap stilt grass down the back hill. "No, don't want your tractor on my land!" So, the wife started lining up logs along the line to keep my tractor off his precious land.

He cut our phone line in 2 places while planting trees. Phone company came out to run a new line. He stood on his land and declared HE did not have an easement. We looked it up. It's 10 ft +/- for utility and drainage easement state wide and likely country wide. Phone company later came out and figure out how to run a new line just on our property.
 

fried1765

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I am very nervous of my situation. distances weren’t adding up after buying my lot two miles down a dirt road. The surveyors came and the corner on the intersection is actually in the center of the roadway. It is a dirt road. The lot was treed and during the course of the last 5 years I cleared the lot enough to install the driveway, build a house/garage. I piled my wood down there, trailer, tractor etc as often I could not turn or needed space for cement-trucks further up the driveway etc. I had to put a pickup load of wood down on the corner, which was on the edge of the road way but maybe 6-8 feet from one side of my boundary and maybe 25 feet inside my other boundary being on a corner. They sent me an email last summer and said someone was having issues with wood but at a different lot number. a Lot that doesn’t exist in there. My thoughts were, well you should find out what lot their really talking about and if it is mine I can accommodate . But I didn’t. I just said any wood I had was inside my boundary’s and that I wasn’t planning to leave it there over the winter. This was in the summer. The next morning I go out there and they bull dozed it into the ditch. I was planning to put a street lamp at least out A little further to prevent more migration of the turn. However yesterday they spread recycled asphalt around the turn It use to be a logging road turned cottAge area. The logging company had a “right of way” designated for a the Road and is exceptionally wide. I’m thinking 60 feet or more. Yet the road which is approx 30 feet wide leaves the right of way and crosses my corner. My survey clearly shows the narrow road, leave the wide right of way on paper. I also showed this to the husband of the recently elected president of the road association last year. He assumed it was half the road on my lot, half the road on the other lot across from me. But I showed him that no, it’s a right of way that separates me from the guy across the lot and at that corner it’s exceptionally wide. Despite the road only being 30 feet or so.
From your sketch it would appear that you own to the center of the roadway (layout), but you likely do not have a right to block that roadway/layout.

Where in Nfld. are you?
I was a USN pilot stationed at Argentia in the mid 60's.
I have great memories of my Nfld. days.
The Trans-Canada highway was still gravel from Gander to Corner Brook.
 
Last edited:

two_bit_score

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From your sketch it would appear that you own to the center of the roadway (layout), but you likely do not have a right to block that roadway/layout.
If it’s an old county road the survey probably would put the property line somewhere in the road. No, he cannot block the road. Yes he still pays tax on the portion in the road.
 

fried1765

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If it’s an old county road the survey probably would put the property line somewhere in the road. No, he cannot block the road. Yes he still pays tax on the portion in the road.
I did not suggest otherwise!
 
  
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Jstpssng

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Please keep in mind that he's in Canada so different rules may apply... just as they do from state to state.
 

FTG-05

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I am very nervous of my situation. distances weren’t adding up after buying my lot two miles down a dirt road. The surveyors came and the corner on the intersection is actually in the center of the roadway. It is a dirt road. The lot was treed and during the course of the last 5 years I cleared the lot enough to install the driveway, build a house/garage. I piled my wood down there, trailer, tractor etc as often I could not turn or needed space for cement-trucks further up the driveway etc. I had to put a pickup load of wood down on the corner, which was on the edge of the road way but maybe 6-8 feet from one side of my boundary and maybe 25 feet inside my other boundary being on a corner. They sent me an email last summer and said someone was having issues with wood but at a different lot number. a Lot that doesn’t exist in there. My thoughts were, well you should find out what lot their really talking about and if it is mine I can accommodate . But I didn’t. I just said any wood I had was inside my boundary’s and that I wasn’t planning to leave it there over the winter. This was in the summer. The next morning I go out there and they bull dozed it into the ditch. I was planning to put a street lamp at least out A little further to prevent more migration of the turn. However yesterday they spread recycled asphalt around the turn It use to be a logging road turned cottAge area. The logging company had a “right of way” designated for a the Road and is exceptionally wide. I’m thinking 60 feet or more. Yet the road which is approx 30 feet wide leaves the right of way and crosses my corner. My survey clearly shows the narrow road, leave the wide right of way on paper. I also showed this to the husband of the recently elected president of the road association last year. He assumed it was half the road on my lot, half the road on the other lot across from me. But I showed him that no, it’s a right of way that separates me from the guy across the lot and at that corner it’s exceptionally wide. Despite the road only being 30 feet or so.
Here's your problem:

 

ranger danger

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I believe a survey is a good idea. I bought 14.37 acres 5 years ago with the idea of building my retirement home there. I looked into hiring a surveyor and found out what they cost. My place is essentially a square, gently sloping and heavily forested. I have neighbors bordering on all sides whose properties have all been surveyed. $40k-$50k to survey my property!!!!!
 

Steppenwolfe

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We're good on the right. That neighbor is a naked gardener like me. We know the liine +/- 10 feet. That's the easement for maintenance anyway.

Neighbor to the left is a pissant territorial rat. Had stakes put in about every 75 to 100 ft down the line. Neighbor on the other side removed them! I planted shrubs on my side of the stakes. Asked him whether he wanted me to mow for the Jap stilt grass down the back hill. "No, don't want your tractor on my land!" So, the wife started lining up logs along the line to keep my tractor off his precious land.

He cut our phone line in 2 places while planting trees. Phone company came out to run a new line. He stood on his land and declared HE did not have an easement. We looked it up. It's 10 ft +/- for utility and drainage easement state wide and likely country wide. Phone company later came out and figure out how to run a new line just on our property.
I had our 95 acres surveyed and t posts put in every 150 ft between corners; then filed at the courthouse. It's my land, I bought it; nothing territorial about it. I even had one guy move a storage shed he had built on my land behind his house.
 

bigtiller

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My friend bought an old house with a detached garage. The neighbor had the same set-up. The garages were about 10ft apart. The neighbor wanted to build a new, bigger garage and told my friend that his garage was over the line by 2ft. He then started making a big stink about it.

So my friend hires a surveyor and found out the neighbor had it backwards. The neighbor garage was 2ft over the line.

The neighbor went from tool to suck-up real fast.
 
  
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Jstpssng

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^^^^
While doing mortgage loan inspections years ago I saw the same thing... except that it was a camp which had been winterized as a house.
The old survey even showed the line going through the building.
The owners were trying to refinance to prevent foreclosure. I'm not sure what ever came out of it.
 

VroomVroom

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From your sketch it would appear that you own to the center of the roadway (layout), but you likely do not have a right to block that roadway/layout.

Where in Nfld. are you?
I was a USN pilot stationed at Argentia in the mid 60's.
I have great memories of my Nfld. days.
The Trans-Canada highway was still gravel from Gander to Corner Brook.
I’m in corner brook area at the moment. But originally further towards the south west corner. Yes Argentina use to be the base. How does that work I wonder. I can’t block it, that’s fine. But can I use it. Can they tell me to move off of it like you see in the pic. I bought land and now part of it is taken already
 

yanmars

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ranger danger: That price seems huge but I do not know what they are up to. I had an irregular 153 acres surveyed that also needed to follow the winding river. Had many markers put down etc. That was a couple of years ago, about $2000 I think.
 

ranger danger

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I'm in northern Ca surrounded by residents with from 1 to 3 acre parcels. I have 15 corner markers. I know where 9 of them are. I'd kill to get a survey done for $2 grand!!!
 
  
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Jstpssng

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You can buy 14 acres here for 40-50K... but you know the 3 things which make it valuable.
 

sandman2234

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I was told by my 87 year old neighbor, a few years after her husband passed away, that the ditch they dug was on the property line. I told her that the stake from when I had the place surveyed in 1999 was at the base of that pine tree. She said, nope, it is right about here... pointing to the ground. I called a friend of mine who does a little surveying for a living. He came out, and sure enough that stake was right where the 87 year old Lady said it was. Dang I really hate to be wrong, lol!
My backyard fence is about 3 foot over on the property line on the other side. When the new neighbors cleared the property, I offered to buy that 3 foot, but "it's not for sale"! Now there are 3 trees right up against the power line and cable line that are dead. The cost to have those 3 removed will probably exceed the value of the 3 feet of property.
David from jax
 

two_bit_score

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What would cause you to be concerned or unsatisfied with a survey? If you were not satisfied, does it need to be done over or do surveys only come with tailight warranty? It would seem that a false survey could create an extremely messy legal situation.
Encroachments could be uncovered. Or there may be setback requirements that are disclosed with the survey that limit what you could build and where. A lot of things could be turned up when a good survey is done.

I am amazed at the number of people who but property and don’t get a survey.

I am aware of one situation where a House was over the line several feet and another where a swimming pool had been built with half of it on the adjoining property.

I would want to resolve those things before I bought it and not be locked into taking a parcel with severe encroachments.
 

dodge man

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Around here more than 95% of property gets bought and sold without a survey. Commercial might be the exception.
 

sandman2234

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Around here more than 95% of property gets bought and sold without a survey. Commercial might be the exception.
Around here, there are no mortgage company's, banks, or credit unions that will loan money on a parcel of property without a recent survey, and current title insurance. At the time of my last purchase, the survey had to be less than 90 days old. I am fixing to find out how recent it has to be currently, because we are looking at purchase of another property.
David from jax
 

bcp

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Not required here. I asked about it and was told they are selling the property as legally described. The new owner has to figure out where that is.

Bruce
 

JPRambo

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When i was looking to buy my <7 acres, one of the neighbors (Robert) knew the property well. It was his sisters and it was given to her by their father. Robert walked the property line with us, through the forest and up and down the elevations. He followed the fence lines and some white PVC pipe that was used to show the property lines. But I wanted a fence and settled on T-poles or wood posts and barbed wire. The land it basically a rectangle, The 4 main corners were marked very well. Since I purchased it there has been two lots surveyed and corners established. In the picture the green line is a cow pasture with barbed wire. The yellow is woodland and had barbed wire that was mostly on the ground. My wife and I put in some wood posts and raised the wire onto the posts and close-enough trees. Purple dots represent new property corners. White dots show where the PVC pipe was marking supposed property line that after survey was as much as 30 feet off the true line. Red oval is neighbor's (Scotty) dog pens. Scotty was glad to hear he had more land than he thought, I guess he di not do a survey either..
 

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dodge man

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Most title insurance has an exclusion that they won’t cover any problems a current and accurate boundary survey would show. In other words if you have a major problem and a survey would have disclosed it you are out of luck. A major problem being something like a house or building being over the boundary.

About three years ago I surveyed a property where about 80% of the house was over the line. The adjoining owner was willing to exchange ground to keep the property the same size but cover the house and yard. The people buying it were savvy enough to know there was a problem.
 

two_bit_score

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Around here more than 95% of property gets bought and sold without a survey. Commercial might be the exception.
Probably close to that in most areas. In the past, if the owner had a recent survey and I could tell nothing had changed I’ve done it.

There is one street I know of in a subdivision where the landowner went in and moved all the survey stakes one evening because he said he wanted to make sure the buyers were getting a full sized lot and all those looked small.

Yes, he was a bit goofy but if the surveyor had not noticed it the next day it could have led to a lot of problems later on.
 

fried1765

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Around here, there are no mortgage company's, banks, or credit unions that will loan money on a parcel of property without a recent survey, and current title insurance. At the time of my last purchase, the survey had to be less than 90 days old. I am fixing to find out how recent it has to be currently, because we are looking at purchase of another property.
David from jax

Not required here. I asked about it and was told they are selling the property as legally described. The new owner has to figure out where that is.

Bruce
That is the most common routine.
 

bcp

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So, are you always ok with accepting the minim legal requirements when your investments are possibly at stake?

It was a nearby property. About 50 years ago when it was subdivided, the properties (hilly) were measured, not surveyed. Surveys showed the measured markers were about 20-30 feet off. I asked the realtor the question about a survey being required by anyone, as new buyers may not be getting what was marked.

Bruce
 
  
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Jstpssng

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Around here, there are no mortgage company's, banks, or credit unions that will loan money on a parcel of property without a recent survey, and current title insurance. At the time of my last purchase, the survey had to be less than 90 days old. I am fixing to find out how recent it has to be currently, because we are looking at purchase of another property.
David from jax
Survey, or mortgage inspection? The first is a lot more detailed, while the latter merely examines what evidence is there and reports obvious problems.
 

dodge man

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I’m still licensed as a surveyor in Illinois but mostly retired. I got my license in 1992 and in all that time I never did a mortgage inspection. You don’t even have to find property corners to do one. I just figured you weren’t getting much for your money.
 
 
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