Stability of the B series vs the L series?????

   #11  

SDT

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Multiple Fords and Kubotas
Hello all,

Last year I acquired 20 acres (10 acres wooded, 10 acres native pasture) and bought a used B2910. The 2910 came with a loader, box blade (with 200 lbs of added weight), and a MMM. Total weight of the setup is around 3300 lbs. I've mostly been using the little tractor to mow the 10 acres of native pasture, and it's doing a decent job. I also use it to move rocks, downed trees, brush, etc. My only complaint so far, is the stability of the 2910. Every time I get on the slightest, side slope, it feels like it's about to tip over. This usually happens while mowing. I'll be cruising along in a straight line, and I'll hit a little hill in the pasture. The tractor will get to leaning, and it feels like i'm about to tip over. As well, when I'm mowing, if one of the rear tires hits an unexpected armadillo hole or erosion channel, that also gives an unexpected, uncomfortable lean. It usually results in me backing up, and going around the little hill or hole. I'm thinking that the narrowness of the B2910, along with the small front tires is what's creating this. Also, i'm keeping the FEL as low as possible, and the box blade low as well.

For those of you that stepped up from a B series to an L series, did you notice a huge difference in stability? I'm now thinking an L2501 would better suit my needs. Or should I go bigger?

There is no answer to your question.

Any tractor will tip over in certain circumstances but most (I did not say all....) will slide downhill before doing so. Driving over a stump or rock with the uphill wheel, or rolling an underinflated tubeless tire off of the rim on the downhill side are the most serious caveats.

I've been mowing in areas where many cannot walk for nearly 50 years without incident but I have learned how to do so.

If you are seriously concerned about tipping over, buy a late model Ford 8N (51 or 52). You cannot do much better in this regard, and they are cheap.

SDT
 
   #12  

JOHNTHOMAS

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F2690 4WD RTV X1140 MX5400 HST ZD1211
I live on a hillside with some close to level land but mostly hillside. I started with a BX2200 FEL MMM and after a year realizing I had ground clearance issues I traded to a B7800 FEL RFM and BX1500MMM (For yard mowing close to house and real steep places). After 3 years I traded to a Grand L3240 FEL which scared the crap out of me on the hillsides since I was so high off the ground and real soon got rid of it to a B3200. Lots of trades later and some land sold and lots more bought I'm driving a L3901 FEL for mostly my 25 acres of woods work/tree clearing and some landscaping. I feel mostly uncomfortable on the L3901 unless it's on the flat land or going straight up or straight down a hill. I have felt it lift up on one side several times with loaded FEL and don't like it one bit. I keep a Boxblade or tiller on the back at all times for weight and tires are loaded.
People say the L is more stable than the B (I've also had several Bs and BXs) because it is heavier and that makes sense but higher off the ground is much more scary. The sliding before tipping I'd sure have to question because I've never slid other than in mud but I sure have tipped. I even tipped/slid in a muddy ditch one time into a small tree which dented my fender and bent my step up to tractor seat. Had to get my RTV1140 with a strap on one side to pull it up hill while I backed it out. Tractors and mud are a ad combination. Got it stuck one time going down a steep muddy hill and had to pull it out with the RTV again.
I almost turned a BX25 over and used the BH to swing up the hill and pull my rear around from my tipping position and did turn one BX25 over while stopped on a hillside after pushing the front bucket down to peel an edge off of the bank while backing up and when I pushed the lever down it just laid down on its side since one side of the bucket on the down hill side had no dirt under it which I figured out later was what happened.
Doubt I helped you with the answer you want to hear but go up and go down on hills and cross ways on flat land.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#13  
OP
L

lharrell799

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Huntsville, AL
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John Deere
I live on a hillside with some close to level land but mostly hillside. I started with a BX2200 FEL MMM and after a year realizing I had ground clearance issues I traded to a B7800 FEL RFM and BX1500MMM (For yard mowing close to house and real steep places). After 3 years I traded to a Grand L3240 FEL which scared the crap out of me on the hillsides since I was so high off the ground and real soon got rid of it to a B3200. Lots of trades later and some land sold and lots more bought I'm driving a L3901 FEL for mostly my 25 acres of woods work/tree clearing and some landscaping. I feel mostly uncomfortable on the L3901 unless it's on the flat land or going straight up or straight down a hill. I have felt it lift up on one side several times with loaded FEL and don't like it one bit. I keep a Boxblade or tiller on the back at all times for weight and tires are loaded.
People say the L is more stable than the B (I've also had several Bs and BXs) because it is heavier and that makes sense but higher off the ground is much more scary. The sliding before tipping I'd sure have to question because I've never slid other than in mud but I sure have tipped. I even tipped/slid in a muddy ditch one time into a small tree which dented my fender and bent my step up to tractor seat. Had to get my RTV1140 with a strap on one side to pull it up hill while I backed it out. Tractors and mud are a ad combination. Got it stuck one time going down a steep muddy hill and had to pull it out with the RTV again.
I almost turned a BX25 over and used the BH to swing up the hill and pull my rear around from my tipping position and did turn one BX25 over while stopped on a hillside after pushing the front bucket down to peel an edge off of the bank while backing up and when I pushed the lever down it just laid down on its side since one side of the bucket on the down hill side had no dirt under it which I figured out later was what happened.
Doubt I helped you with the answer you want to hear but go up and go down on hills and cross ways on flat land.

Hahaaha, you just confused me even more. You could say I'm new to tractors. I've only got about 11 months experience with this used B2910. So far it's done everything I've asked of it, I just can't get over the uneasy feeling I get, when I get it off camber. I'm mowing our pastures with the 60" MMM, and I bought my wife a Honda atv, with a Swisher 42" rough cut mower. She can literally cover almost twice as much ground as I can. With the atv and Swisher, she never slows down. Slopes, hills, dips, ruts, etc. She just cruises through all of it. On flat ground, I can cruise with the B2910 while mowing. But, as soon as I get into rough terrain, I have to slow down and creep along. Meanwhile, she's mowing circles around me. Literally!

Maybe I just don't know the capabilities of the B2910. I put an angle finder on the hood, and when I start feeling nervous, it's usually at 15 degrees. I wish there was a way to test the tipover angle of my tractor, without actually tipping it.
 
   #14  

Smokeydog

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B26 mowing and backhoe on a hilly East Tennessee 140ac Farm. Adding 2” rear wheel spacers and liquid ballast made a huge and comfortable difference. 6’ 3pt finish mower. Can’t remove loader but can drop ssqa bucket.
Bigger helps for stability, not for maneuverability.
 
   #15  

JWR

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I have a BX, B, and have had 3 L's. They all needed help with tipping from the dealer. Wheel weights, loaded tires, and spacers. You might not be able to put spacers with the MMM. I have 2" spacers on the BX and it makes the MMM tight, also loaded tires. The B I loaded tires and wheel weights, that helped but wish I had spacers too. When mowing I don't like loader or weight on back with the BX. The B I only have a pull behind mower, but no loader when mowing. The L has wheels set out as far as they well go, wheel weights, and loaded tires.

Your feelings of instability and vulnerability to turnover are accurate & well founded. This topic (rollover instability of Kubotas) has come up many times on TBN in many posts. The frequent readers already know what I am about to say. The Japanese still have never comprehended that many of us need to operate on steep ground. At least the 60hp and below Kubotas have significantly less rear wheel spread ability than the competition. One of the very few downsides of Kubota. I have 2 B2150's and a BX2200 and bought several BX for other folks. The BX's have no ability to adjust/set the rear wheels out at all. Some of the larger machines like M8560 and others do have adjustments, just not enough.

I strongly recommend rear wheel spacers if you have a need to operate on hillsides. I put 6" spacers on one of my B2150's that made it totally different and very stable on steep ground. I have had modified gage wheel frames made for the belly mower in order to clear the rear wheels but well worth it. I assume you know that wider front wheels do no good because the front is center pivoted.
 
   #16  

Milo

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I recently moved from a B2650 to an L2501 which most would say was simply a lateral change but my reasons were twofold. First the expensive mmm didn't really work as well as I hoped on my rough ground so I went to a ZTR which works much better. Second when cleaning up with my grapple over rough, rutted, ground that had just been logged I found the B2650 felt very tippy even keeping the grapple as low as possible. I considered wheel spacers as the B2650 was only around 53" wide outside rear tires. I checked an L01 on the lot and it's rear tires measured 58" about 5-6" wider. Long story short rather than try to sell the MMM by itself and buy wheel spacers, I sold the B2650 complete with MMM and bought an L2501. I can say unequivocally that going back on the same ground doing the same work the L is noticeably more stable. I may even space out the rear another 4" (2" each side) which'll still keep it a bit under the 66" width bucket.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#17  
OP
L

lharrell799

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Huntsville, AL
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John Deere
Your feelings of instability and vulnerability to turnover are accurate & well founded. This topic (rollover instability of Kubotas) has come up many times on TBN in many posts. The frequent readers already know what I am about to say. The Japanese still have never comprehended that many of us need to operate on steep ground. At least the 60hp and below Kubotas have significantly less rear wheel spread ability than the competition. One of the very few downsides of Kubota. I have 2 B2150's and a BX2200 and bought several BX for other folks. The BX's have no ability to adjust/set the rear wheels out at all. Some of the larger machines like M8560 and others do have adjustments, just not enough.

I strongly recommend rear wheel spacers if you have a need to operate on hillsides. I put 6" spacers on one of my B2150's that made it totally different and very stable on steep ground. I have had modified gage wheel frames made for the belly mower in order to clear the rear wheels but well worth it. I assume you know that wider front wheels do no good because the front is center pivoted.

6" spacers on each side, or 6" total? Where did you get them?
 
   #18  

JWR

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6" spacers on each side, or 6" total? Where did you get them?

Yes, 6" each side, total of 12" wider tread now. HUGE difference of course. Mine are Bora brand ordered from the mfr on the West coast. There are several very good brands and 3 different designs that I am familiar with. The Bora people had every little quirk of my particular model Kubota down to a T and I was impressed. Nothing missing. Everything figured out. These are one piece solid aluminum billets that are machined to fit , accept the lugs, etc. Not a minutes trouble with them. Totally satisfied.

Other good brands include Bro-tek and Hansen. Plus some Kubota dealers sell them as well but at steeper prices & not sure who makes them. So there are 4 brands I investigated before buying. Here are a few pictures:

First one is owned by a friend using them on a L3400. Bought via their dealer.
View attachment 611931


This is the Hansen brand. Note welded construction.

View attachment 611932

Third is the Bro-tek brand. Similar construction to my Bora.
View attachment 611933


Fourth and fifth are my Bora brand spacer out on the truck tailgate and then installed.

View attachment 611934

View attachment 611935
 
   #19  

JOHNTHOMAS

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F2690 4WD RTV X1140 MX5400 HST ZD1211
Hahaaha, you just confused me even more. You could say I'm new to tractors. I've only got about 11 months experience with this used B2910. So far it's done everything I've asked of it, I just can't get over the uneasy feeling I get, when I get it off camber. I'm mowing our pastures with the 60" MMM, and I bought my wife a Honda atv, with a Swisher 42" rough cut mower. She can literally cover almost twice as much ground as I can. With the atv and Swisher, she never slows down. Slopes, hills, dips, ruts, etc. She just cruises through all of it. On flat ground, I can cruise with the B2910 while mowing. But, as soon as I get into rough terrain, I have to slow down and creep along. Meanwhile, she's mowing circles around me. Literally!

Maybe I just don't know the capabilities of the B2910. I put an angle finder on the hood, and when I start feeling nervous, it's usually at 15 degrees. I wish there was a way to test the tipover angle of my tractor, without actually tipping it.

The knowing when it's past the degrees of tipping could get you hurt. If the ground was level as pavement that would help but very little ground is that smooth. The unseen hole or unseen rock/tree limb would get you every time. They are what scare me when one side starts rising on the high side or a drop on the low side from and old rotted below the ground level stump or dislodged rock. I try to go up or down and get to my more level spots to make turns.
Tip for newer owners: Wet grass is worse than snow going down hill and gravel in two wheel drive can make the tractor gain speed as it slides down hill (Keep it in 4wd when not on pavement or all level ground).
My ATV and RTVs will also run circles around my tractor but they are not mowing. I like a rear finish mower much more than a belly mower on a tractor and they are usually cheaper, just need more planning for space to turn. Also RFM are much easier for maintenance if it's ever needed.
When my zero turn front wheels drops back down to the ground on the front as I crest a steep hill also scares me and the lose of control of the Z going down steep hills is also scary and why I also have the 4wd F mower which is super stable and controlable.
 
   #20  

flusher

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Sacramento
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Getting old. Sold the ranch. Sold the tractors. Moved back to the city.
Little CUTs can be tippy. My Kubota B7510HST almost rolled when the right front wheel dropped down into a wheel rut while using the 4-ft wide FEL to move some loose dirt. I replaced that tractor with a much larger one, a Mahindra 5525 with a 6-ft wide FEL and never had any tipping problems.

Kubota on the left. Mahindra on the right.

5525-Bota front.JPG

If you want the utmost in stability, you can modify a tractor to look like my 1964 MF135 diesel. Those are 18.4 x 16 tires on the rear (16" diameter rims). That size wheel is used on combines and bankout trucks. The front wheel spindles were shortened to keep the tractor level.

MF135 stump2.JPGMF135 stump1 (1).JPG

Good luck
 
 
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