The tractor collecting thing...

   #1  

Anonymous Poster

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Now that we have actually begun our tractor collection, the next thing we have to do is decide HOW we want to do this tractor collecting thing. Do we want a stable of museum-quality absolutely perfect, authenticlly documented tractors or do we just want the tractors to be all there and running. I have a buddy who is into Model A Fords, and the Model A thing has become so onerous that the "inspectors" will downgrade a car if there is one more pleat in the upholstery than was in there originally. I personally don't think I have the temperment to try and out-restore the super-serious restorer, and I don't think it would be much fun. The John Deeres that I drove as a kid never looked new, and that's how I remember them......with a normal coating of dirt and grease on the control deck. Although the most cherished picture on the walls of my office is a photo of a perfect Model G John Deere, I think I would much rather collect "working" tractors; in "working clothes", that make that healthy John Deere sound as they boil dirt over the sides of a drag scraper.
 
   #2  

Thomas

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Apr 6, 2000
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Lebanon,NH.
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Kubota B2650HSD w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046 & Craftman T2200 lawn mower.
It does indeed take alot of time to bring back those yester year gaints..finding parts,time away from the family,$$$,headaches etc..but w/ a good pressure washer and grease remover soap and wax job,those gaints look pretty darn sharp.
 
   #3  

Steve_in_Ont

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Dec 13, 2001
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193
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Mexico City
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NH TC21D
CJDave - I think that the "correct police" are the end result of the human nature to "fix that one more/last thing". I agree with your position about collecting working tractors, however many have started with that intention, and fallen victim to the above... Notice the below transition:
Say your dash is a little sun baked...
- let's just paint the dash
- let's just replace that one gauge that does quite look right
- oh.. the wiring could use a bit of work... wow, you can buy a repro wiring harness for not too much money
- Well now we can hook up that rear light that hasn't worked in a while
- If we're going to do that, we should paint the fenders
I think that you can see where this is going...

Good Luck!
 
   #4  

ScottAR

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Jul 6, 2002
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Greene Co, Arkansas
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JD 1050 2wd, Case 580D 2wd
There are as many opinions as there are collectors but mine has always been do what you want. I think that all parts of the machine should function and a nice paint never hurts. If it has some scratches, that's part of the game. Most important, is that you enjoy it. Take it out, drive it, operate it, use it like the manufacter's intended. I'm personally looking for some 30 series case's. /w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif
 
   #5  

RobertN

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Shingle Springs California
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New Holland TC40D
Read those Roger Welch books, start with "rusted nuckles and busted tractors". He has some good insights both on how much work to do to a tractor, as well as helpful hints on working on them.

I just finished "Love, Sex, and Tractors".... What a hoot!
 
   #6  

s1120

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Columbia county NY
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87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N
Thats a tough questen. One of my biggest hobbys is working on old cars. I have a Mustang that I am restoring now. People always say"Why did you pick that model" "It won't be worth much money"" Thats not the stock motor"

Well, Heres what I have to say. I build what I want to build. I build it for me, not for the next guy. My Mustang is a 1970 coupe. When done it will be worth about 7 grand. OK, I will have almost 15 into it. So what. I am not planing on selling it for 20. I will be my kids in about 20 years. Same with tractors. Why do someting so perfict that you will not want to bring it out and use it. Thats what its for. If a nice tractor, truck, or eaven a car, is fully restored, and sitting in a garage, and not in use it is worth nothing. Its just a lump of steel, and iron. The real beauty is in using them, or working them. A tractor yanking on a big plow. An old car with a big motor, pulling away from a stop, pushing you in your seat, with the pipes crying. THATS beauty!
 
   #7  

ScottAR

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Greene Co, Arkansas
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JD 1050 2wd, Case 580D 2wd
Any consolation, I love the looks of the '70 cars. /w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#8  
OP
A

Anonymous Poster

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I can definitely see where you are going with that.... and I have to say that when I look at my tractor the same feeling begins to creep over me...insidiously. "SHUDDER" without me even realizing it at first. As I look over the tractor and see the little things that need attention, there is that little voice inside that keeps saying: "Do a frame-up restoration and fix EVERYTHING all at once." However, I KNOW that if I do that it will be a years-long project and will rob me of the use of the tractor in the meantime, and then afterward will I even want to get it dirty? It isn't a perfectly stock A because it has Behlen Pwr Strg, so there is also a strong urge on my part to "customize" it a little more with some add-ons that I wanted to add to a Model A tractor in 1958, like some better lights, and a toilet paper by-pass oil filter.
 
   #9  

s1120

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Nov 19, 2000
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Columbia county NY
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87 Ingersoll 444, 84 Ingersoll224/'44 GreavlyL/60'sGreavlyL/49 Ford 8N
<font color=red>and a toilet paper by-pass oil filter</font color=red>

I remember for years you used to be able to get these from JCWhinty. I keep telling people at work about them, but no one had ever heard of them. I tend to have delt with a lot of these old timer stuff. Eaven though I am not eaven 40 yet, my dad was about 50years older then me, and he tought be most of what I know about mech. things. Heck, in the early 80's I was working on flat head V8's
 

pfoxy

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Apr 26, 2001
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105
Location
Maine
Tractor
1988 John Deere 750, 1938 McCormick-Deering (Farmall) F14
IMHO, s1120 has it just exactly right. Do what floats YOUR boat!

My '38 F14 has been 'repaired' not 'restored'. Lots of things "wrong" with it, according to the Correct Police. Wrong reproduction manifold. Wrong exhaust. Wrong wheels/tires on rear. Wrong seat. Wrong radiator shutters, Wrong gauges, Blah, blah, blah...

Guess what. When it's hooked up to my 'repaired' 1950 John Deere Model H maure spreader, neither the tractor, the spreader, nor the load knows the difference, everything works just fine, and I'm grinning like an idiot the whole time.

I got no use for trailer queens, and I'm just not the sort of person who has the time, resources or inclination to have paint computer-matched to that chip of original paint I found under the gas tank straps.

On the other hand, if that sort of detail is what makes you smile, then by all means go for it! The whole idea is to have fun.

Speakin' of which, another concept that eludes me is purchasing an already restored tractor. They've had all the 'fun' taken out of them, what's the point? /w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif

Oh, and somebody recommended Roger Welsch's books. They should be required reading for anyone that messes with old iron...
 
 
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