Towing capacity

Egon

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Close, but no cigar:) The weight distribution hitch also puts weight on the trailer axles. The longer the spring bar, the more weight gets transferred to the trailer.

ever see the advertisement with the front wheel drive car towing a trailer with the rear wheels off the ground?? !
 

Jstpssng

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ever see the advertisement with the front wheel drive car towing a trailer with the rear wheels off the ground?? !
Ning just included that picture about 4 posts above you.
 

Grumpycat

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Close, but no cigar:) The weight distribution hitch also puts weight on the trailer axles. The longer the spring bar, the more weight gets transferred to the trailer.
No, the load goes to the front wheels as well.

Weight Distributing Hitch is a misnomer. It is a Load Distributing Hitch. Weights do not move but the loads on the axles are moved.
 

mwemaxxowner

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load leveller / weight distribution hitch. = the same thing!

In most cases one is required for loads over 5000 pounds.
I may be misunderstanding what you mean, but if by "load leveler" you mean something like airbags you're grossly mistaken. Airbags and the like are no substitute for a WDH and proper load distribution. Leveling up the load with bags does not generally make weight distribution any better, i.e. fix tongue weight or front axle load issues. In some cases it makes it worse! Just makes it appear better.

With my Curt True-Trac on my f150 with my camper I restore 100% of the front axle load back to the front axle of my truck. With 13% TW and plenty of weight on the steer axles it handles well.
 

ning

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No, the load goes to the front wheels as well.

Weight Distributing Hitch is a misnomer. It is a Load Distributing Hitch. Weights do not move but the loads on the axles are moved.
You're both right and both saying the same thing :rolleyes:
The WDH/LDH basically builds a weight bridge across the trailer/hitch coupling and can ultimately make the weight span from the rearmost trailer axle to the forwardmost tow vehicle axle if tensioned sufficiently and nothing bends or breaks in the process...
 

MossRoad

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You'll find that a typical class IV or class V trailer hitch will have different ratings depending on the use or non-use of a weight-distributing hitch.

It doesn't affect the base vehicle's tow ratings, but you're not allowed to exceed the capacity of the hitch, either, even if you're within the limits of the truck.
Yes, I know that part of it. I have a hitch on my Suburban that's rated for 10,000# but the max tow rating is 8100#.
 

LD48750

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SE, MI
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load leveller / weight distribution hitch. = the same thing!

In most cases one is required for loads over 5000 pounds.
Must be a regional thing...
When I was growing up, load levelers were coil springs over the rear shocks.
We also had air bags that were used for more weight then the coil overs could handle.
WDHitches were the next step up.
 

Chewwy

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Upstate SC
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Kubota LA3240, MF 265
load leveller / weight distribution hitch. = the same thing!

In most cases one is required for loads over 5000 pounds.

“Load levelers” is an imprecise term covering various products including but not limited to WD hitches. WD hitches are a specific set of products that transfer hitch load from the rear axle, rear suspension and rear tires of the tow vehicle. One should not be confused with the other.
 

ROUSTABOUT

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Yes, I agree except it is more than 2" on most pickup trucks and most loads. Depends on load of course ! In my experience with a typical 4WD pickup (springs-wise) and a GVWR load [trailer and what's on it combined] of around 8 to 10K lbs you want about 5 or 6" of drop in the back of the truck. The more total towed weight the more tongue weight you need. There are guidelines for % of the load that tongue weight should be (undoubtedly mentioned somewhere in the 109 posts above) but I never look at it that way. Like you I eyeball it and adjust to suit.
Ive always had Ford twin I beam. Can't put so much on rear that it lifts the front. I like a straight axle 4x4 best.
 
 
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