Tractors and wood! Show your pics

John_Mc

Elite Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2001
Messages
3,134
Location
Monkton, Vermont
Tractor
NH TC33D Modified with belly pan, limb risers & FOPS for work in the woods
I wish I had been aware of the Frostbite grapple before I bought the MTL. It seems better suited to picking up individual logs when that function is needed. I can get it done with the MTL, but it is more of a challenge...or maybe reflects my lack of expertise.

There are other styles of grapples that will run rings around a forestry grapple for other purposes, but I've yet to find anything better than a forestry grapple for handling logs. (Yes, I'm aware that there are those on here who disagree with me on that point.) The narrow profile is also a realy boon when maneuvering in tight spaces in the woods.

Frostbite is one example, there are a couple of others that are basically the same design. I have a Sundown GR40: functionally, they are identical, though I will admit that I like some of the design features of the Frostbite a bit better.

I'm not familiar with the MTL grapple myself, but I'm sure there are things it will do with ease that would be a pain in the neck to do with a forestry grapple.
 

arrow

Elite Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2002
Messages
4,688
Location
Foster, RI
Tractor
Mahindra 3016
I was thinking the same thing.
I wouldn't fret all that much,
Gordon's post (17,639) shows what loggers do when making firewood. The "cutting bed" is made up of the rounds.

When we had "firewood days" as opposed to mill stems, the skidder would come up on the first turn with a 7-12 stem hitch. We'd cut up the first stems still attached to the skidder.
The served as the "bed". On subsequent turns, the skidder would drive right over this bed, we'd dechoke the stems and we'd cut up the stems over the previously cut rounds.
You really didn't need anything holding the stem in the air to cut it up if you made this "table" first.

I use this method to this day and just place the stems on the "table"..
 

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Gordon Gould

Super Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
5,290
Location
NorthEastern, VT
Tractor
Kubota L3010DT, Kubota M5640SUD, Dresser TD7G Dozer
Arrow is right. I used to block up my wood right off the log pile - cut some in front then roll a log down on top of the bed of blocks and keep going like that until you get tired of working on and around the pile of blocks that builds up. And then you have to move them. Moving the logs off the pile with a grapple or forks or what ever so you can block them up in the clear is the big benefit to me since my footing isn't what it used to be. And I can block up the whole pile w/o having to move any blocks out of the way. Not having to bend over to get started is just a nice side benefit. These are a couple pics from this morning. I welded a stump vise on my grapple for touching up my saw chain.

21_4_6-1.JPG


This log I set down on the blocks before I cut it, like arrow said, because I didn't have my shin guards on.

21_4_6-2.JPG



gg
 

Skeans1

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
374
Location
NW OR
Tractor
JD 6410, JD 730 Crop Row, Kubota B3030
Arrow is right. I used to block up my wood right off the log pile - cut some in front then roll a log down on top of the bed of blocks and keep going like that until you get tired of working on and around the pile of blocks that builds up. And then you have to move them. Moving the logs off the pile with a grapple or forks or what ever so you can block them up in the clear is the big benefit to me since my footing isn't what it used to be. And I can block up the whole pile w/o having to move any blocks out of the way. Not having to bend over to get started is just a nice side benefit. These are a couple pics from this morning. I welded a stump vise on my grapple for touching up my saw chain.

View attachment 693626

This log I set down on the blocks before I cut it, like arrow said, because I didn't have my shin guards on.

View attachment 693627


gg

I wouldn't fret all that much,
Gordon's post (17,639) shows what loggers do when making firewood. The "cutting bed" is made up of the rounds.

When we had "firewood days" as opposed to mill stems, the skidder would come up on the first turn with a 7-12 stem hitch. We'd cut up the first stems still attached to the skidder.
The served as the "bed". On subsequent turns, the skidder would drive right over this bed, we'd dechoke the stems and we'd cut up the stems over the previously cut rounds.
You really didn't need anything holding the stem in the air to cut it up if you made this "table" first.

I use this method to this day and just place the stems on the "table"..

I envy you guys with no brush it’s something we don’t see out here.

Here’s what spring looks like in the PNW you spend more time slashing your way through vs actually cutting timber.
IMG_2709.jpg
 

MiserableOldFart

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2006
Messages
447
Location
Delaware County Catskills NY
Tractor
NH Workmaster 40, Kubota GR2120
OK, my tractor isn't in one, but it brought all the wood to the pile. From a few years ago.
 

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shooterdon

Elite Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2012
Messages
2,767
Location
Near Johannesburg MI but in the middle of nowhere
Tractor
2019 LS XR4140 HST Cab; 2020 Kawasaki Mule SX; 2021 Bad Boy 54" ZT Elite
OK, my tractor isn't in one, but it brought all the wood to the pile. From a few years ago.
I have neither the desire, energy or time to stack wood like that. I am lot more miserable and older I guess...LOL.

Totes cost a bit, but are much more efficient plus easy to move around. Working smarter beats "pretty" for my needs. I use 32 totes and can store 15 cords in them. the plastic bin is raised to increase capacity and serves as covering from rain and snow.

2020 Wood 2.jpg


My cost for 32 totes was $800. The photo shows some stored on my old RV pad. The one front and on the right shows how a access the tote for stacking and unloading. Totes are staged in the garage using the tractor. Each holds just under .5 cord.
 

Jstpssng

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
15,729
Location
Maine
Tractor
Kubota L3301
OK, my tractor isn't in one, but it brought all the wood to the pile. From a few years ago.
That's a pretty amazing wood stack. 👍 Once again, I read your post too fast last night. I thought that it said "my tractor isn't one". I'm having my eyes checked later this month... 😆
 

NPurdy1112

Silver Member
Joined
May 24, 2017
Messages
119
Location
West Central Indiana
Tractor
Kioti NX4510 HST
I have neither the desire, energy or time to stack wood like that. I am lot more miserable and older I guess...LOL.

Totes cost a bit, but are much more efficient plus easy to move around. Working smarter beats "pretty" for my needs. I use 32 totes and can store 15 cords in them. the plastic bin is raised to increase capacity and serves as covering from rain and snow.

My cost for 32 totes was $800. The photo shows some stored on my old RV pad. The one front and on the right shows how a access the tote for stacking and unloading. Totes are staged in the garage using the tractor. Each holds just under .5 cord.

Agree on the totes. They are hard to find around here lately. Last source I purchased from said they havent seen any in ~6 months. And they are not near as cheap here either!
 

deezler

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2012
Messages
2,210
Location
Southeast MI
Tractor
Cub Cadet 7305, Kioti CK3510seh TLB
Don, doesn't you wood still always get wet with the tote liners tucked inside the tote frame like that? I would think all the water will just trickle down the sides, over the wood ends, and run through all the wood still. I always make sure to get a half sheet of plywood sitting out over the top edge of the tote frame, or my tarp shed setup pulled out over the edges too.
 
 
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