Tractors and wood! Show your pics

   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,561  
maybe you are confusing rock/sugar maple (acer saccharum) with red maple (acer rubrum) because ''decent" firewood doesnt do it justice. As firewood I would pick it over any other specie.
I’m not confusing the species whatsoever. I’ve cut it, sawed, planed and sanded it, burnt it, tapped and tasted it and made furniture with it.
I will say being in the woods for 60 years has made me not prone to hyperbole.
It’s like me saying 24” of snowfall is a decent amount of snow.
Someone from Texas may describe that with more gusto.
I can also think of about a dozen other wood species I’d prefer over either oak or rock maple as firewood.
 
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   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,562  
Yeah, poplar isn't my first choice for firewood either, but I can burn it outside and use it to fuel slash fires. Sure do have plenty of it right now :)
My morning wood is Poplar, starts quick, burns hot, leaves a bed of coals so I can roll over and go back to sleep.
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,563  
My morning wood is Poplar, starts quick, burns hot, leaves a bed of coals so I can roll over and go back to sleep.
Best not burn that outside, prolly.
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,564  
maybe you are confusing rock/sugar maple (acer saccharum) with red maple (acer rubrum) because ''decent" firewood doesnt do it justice. As firewood I would pick it over any other specie.
I'm not sure what species you have to choose from in your area. Sugar Maple is very good firewood, but I wold not go so far as to say I "pick it over any other species".

Around here we have Hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana - tends to be small, but packs a LOT of BTUs), Shagbark Hickory (Carya Ovata), Black Birch (Betula lenta), White Oak (Quercus alba), and Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis) all of which beat Sugar Maple for BTU content.

We also have a lot of American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) which is only slightly lower than Sugar Maple in BTU content, but a good firewood choice: Lower moisture content when green (the only common tree in our area with a lower green moisture content is Ash, and it only beats Beech by a couple percent), dries faster than Sugar Maple, nothing much for a commercial market for the wood, and a lot of it is suffering from Beech Bark disease anyway.
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,565  
I'm not sure what species you have to choose from in your area. Sugar Maple is very good firewood, but I wold not go so far as to say I "pick it over any other species".

Around here we have Hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana - tends to be small, but packs a LOT of BTUs), Shagbark Hickory (Carya Ovata), Black Birch (Betula lenta), White Oak (Quercus alba), and Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis) all of which beat Sugar Maple for BTU content.

We also have a lot of American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) which is only slightly lower than Sugar Maple in BTU content, but a good firewood choice: Lower moisture content when green (the only common tree in our area with a lower green moisture content is Ash, and it only beats Beech by a couple percent), dries faster than Sugar Maple, nothing much for a commercial market for the wood, and a lot of it is suffering from Beech Bark disease anyway.
beside black birch we do have those other species around here--I am 50km north of the border--but they are few and far between save for hophornbeam which is common but like you said is only a small understory tree just like blue beech (carpus caroliana) another widespread small high BTU tree.

sugar maple splits and dries fine and coals up better and longer than any other I have tried.

in my area it is the climax tree and all others are weeded out whenever they sprout too close to a healthy sugar maple
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,566  
My morning wood is Poplar, starts quick, burns hot, leaves a bed of coals so I can roll over and go back to sleep.
I believe that you have a different poplar than we do.
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,567  
Hophornbeam (Ostrya virginiana - tends to be small, but packs a LOT of BTUs), Shagbark Hickory (Carya Ovata), Black Birch (Betula lenta), White Oak (Quercus alba), and Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis) all of which beat Sugar Maple for BTU content
The only one of these I have is hornbeam, and they aren't particularly common. I'd like to find one big enough to saw out some ax handle blanks.
The first time I encountered the others was on a cruise down in Vermont. I'd been working about 3 days when the project manager called and said "I forgot to tell you that there is hickory and butternut down there".
Rats! I went to the bookstore and bought a tree ID guide, then returned to every cruise plot which had what I called ash.
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,568  
Finished processing 8 cord in April and loading into 32 pods. This is our 6th season using the pods.

20240423_120838.jpg


No repairs to the pods at all once I affixed cleats to their bottoms and set them on treated 2x4s (that sink flush to the ground).
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,569  
Finished processing 8 cord in April and loading into 32 pods. This is our 6th season using the pods.

View attachment 874950

No repairs to the pods at all once I affixed cleats to their bottoms and set them on treated 2x4s (that sink flush to the ground).
Is that all ash?
 
   / Tractors and wood! Show your pics #23,570  
Pretty fancy to have a paved area for your wood. I assume that’s just a temporary location for it?
 
 
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