Oil & Fuel Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel

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TractorNH

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The reasons in your article are the reasons my dealer told me to always use a diesel additive. I've used the Power Service one and now use the Howe's one but both are similar and seem to work well.
 
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RalphVa

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You could also put in a quart of ATF about every 20 gallons.

Ralph
 
  
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klancf51

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You could also put in a quart of ATF about every 20 gallons.

Ralph

We are discussing modern (2007 and newer) high-pressure common rail direct injection diesel engines here. I would NOT recommend using ATF as a ULSD fuel additive: there is no evidence that it is ULSD-compatible. As such, it may actually damage certain newer emissions systems. This is the sort of advice that can really cause trouble. Unless you are absolutely certain ATF is an additive recommended by an engine manufacturer, you should delete or change your post. Additionally, based on my research, I suspect that it contributes very little to the fuel lubricity.
 
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klancf51

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How does that ATF react to the EPA smog pollution devices.

Good question. The answer is: adding ATF to ULSD could actually damage modern diesel emissions components. The post recommending ATF as a ULSD additive should be deleted.
 
  
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klancf51

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The reasons in your article are the reasons my dealer told me to always use a diesel additive. I've used the Power Service one and now use the Howe's one but both are similar and seem to work well.

I've looked into this a lot. The fuel producers (e.g. Gulf Oil) test their products at their terminals. My best advice is try to find a ULSD retailer who can obtain the terminal Distillate Fuel Laboratory Report and the HFRR test result. From this you can determine precisely which additive best and most economically addresses your needs for lubricity, cetane, emulsification/emulsification, pour point, etc. You may find you don't really need an additive.

However, if I had to choose an additive without the benefit of a Distillate Fuel Laboratory Report or HFRR test, I would select Opti-Lube XPD. Based on my research, it's clearly the best ULSD additive for my European diesel engine.
 
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so I have a question, my buddy has been having issues with his tractor ( 560 farmall diesel ) getting sludged up with fuel. I noticed when I was pouring the same fuel - from 5 gallon plastic jugs - putting into the old galvanized funnel we all used to use and twist in the spout and just dumped our 5 gallon metal cans into and let them sit this creamy yellow slim/sludge was plogging up that little screen in the bottom of the filter also and I would have to scrape it out when putting it in his White 2-105 - so fast forward a couple months, the neighbor says he have you guys had any troubles with bio diesel - I said heck I don't know if I ever had any in anything - well come to find out, the place we get our fuel ( off road dyed diesel ) had been getting bio diesel they said from a different company - neighbor was having the same issues with his 886 and 1066 and slime/sludge creamy stuff - so is that just a common thing for bio diesel ? is it not supposed to be used for off road/dye? we quit getting it from that station and are now going over to another store with a off road/dyed pump and are not experiencing the sludge/creamy slime - the folks at the old station said they quit buying the bio diesel but gosh after all that fiasco we are a little gun shy - any thoughts?
 
  
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klancf51

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so I have a question, my buddy has been having issues with his tractor ( 560 farmall diesel ) getting sludged up with fuel. I noticed when I was pouring the same fuel - from 5 gallon plastic jugs - putting into the old galvanized funnel we all used to use and twist in the spout and just dumped our 5 gallon metal cans into and let them sit this creamy yellow slim/sludge was plogging up that little screen in the bottom of the filter also and I would have to scrape it out when putting it in his White 2-105 - so fast forward a couple months, the neighbor says he have you guys had any troubles with bio diesel - I said heck I don't know if I ever had any in anything - well come to find out, the place we get our fuel ( off road dyed diesel ) had been getting bio diesel they said from a different company - neighbor was having the same issues with his 886 and 1066 and slime/sludge creamy stuff - so is that just a common thing for bio diesel ? is it not supposed to be used for off road/dye? we quit getting it from that station and are now going over to another store with a off road/dyed pump and are not experiencing the sludge/creamy slime - the folks at the old station said they quit buying the bio diesel but gosh after all that fiasco we are a little gun shy - any thoughts?

My first thought is that the fuel has a microbial infestation (the common term is "algae", but "microbe" is more accurate). Yes, removing the sulfur from diesel fuel has coincidentally reduced its resistance to microbial growth. The root cause is water in fuel somewhere in the supply chain and the microbes had an opportunity to multiply. It is good practice to abandon a supplier of contaminated fuel. Check out 8 Signs of Diesel Fuel Contamination by Microbes Fungus and Bacteria for tips on identification and remediation. Good luck.
 

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"creamy yellow slim/sludge"

Good grief....buy your fuel elsewhere. I run all my fuel through a paint filter that in placed in a funnel and if I saw that, I would get my money back and dump the fuel.
 

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Bobcat manual:

1, Fuel must not contain more than 5% biodiesel (B5)
2, Biodiesel (BD) may cause plugged fuel system in cold temps
3, BD is an excellent medium for microbial growth
4, BD may result in premature failure of fuel system components
5, With BD, you may have to replace the filters more often

After many more........"Note: Biodiesel blend fuel does not have long term stability and should not be stored for more than 3 months."
 
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You could also put in a quart of ATF about every 20 gallons.

Ralph

No. No, no no...

Do not do this. This is advice from the 70's and 80's when fuel and diesels were much, much different.
 

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<snip>

However, if I had to choose an additive without the benefit of a Distillate Fuel Laboratory Report or HFRR test, I would select Opti-Lube XPD. Based on my research, it's clearly the best ULSD additive for my European diesel engine.

What research? Do you have and can you provide links to independent studies? I had been looking into it since before I bought my soon to be turned in 2009 VW TDI. It seemed that all reports led back to one small study. Now I'm about to buy a Ford Transit Connect diesel and will still need additives.
 

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As far as additives from the limited information available the Opti-Lube seems to be one of the better,
also the 2-5% bio-blends seem good,
then there is always 2-stroke oil
 

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oh my gosh................I had no idea that BD was so volatile and concerning with fuel systems - I have no idea the concentration amounts of what they purchased either - I am sure the station was getting a price break on it and charging the upper price of regular #2 D. good lord I wish we had known it was so unstable and didn't store for long periods not to mention that the station didn't bother to tell anyone until we started having problems and started asking questions.

And yes from my own non scientific research - school of hard knocks, I can attest the it will clog up a screen in a galvanized funnel, it will clog up filters on a tractor, it will jack up your fuel system to the extent that the screen in your sediment bowl will get the white/creamy slimy stuff on it and fuel will not pass - and your tractor will die over and over and you have to keep cleaning it out - we finally drained the tanks on the 560 and the white and put in fuel from another station - I don't know if it was some sort of slimy mold or what but it was bad - guess what I so now before I fill up my diesel cans!!! due to my scientific research I go into the station ask them what kind of fuel they are selling and then still fill with caution. sheesh.......
 

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Are the people that use Bio-D the ones really going through a bunch of fuel and they get it cheap?
 

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I've run some B20 in my pickup and I have had the B5 in my tractor tanks.
I had no problem with either fuel, the B5 was a 250 gallon lot into my summer fuel tank, it lasted the better part of two years.
The B20 was in a 2015 RAM Eco-diesel and it was only two tanks full as I got it traveling, the truck ran fine with it.
Bio fuel should be meeting ASTM standards if you were getting paraffin or glycerin the fuel wasn't of the proper quality.
 

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Can you buy B50 or B100 or would you get that from a supplier?
 
  
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klancf51

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What research? Do you have and can you provide links to independent studies? I had been looking into it since before I bought my soon to be turned in 2009 VW TDI. It seemed that all reports led back to one small study. Now I'm about to buy a Ford Transit Connect diesel and will still need additives.

You didn't read the article on LinkedIn did you? Some references are there. Opti-Lube commissioned and published the 2014 Intertek HFRR test per ASTM D6079. The science appears to support Opti-Lube's nitrogen addition approach and the results of the 2014 Intertek HFRR test. I believe that's how they are able to achieve it - it's remarkable, in my opinion.
 
  
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With regard to biodiesel fuel for my tractor, Case IH specifies biodiesel blends meeting ASTM 6751 or EN14214 up to B5 (5% blend ratio). I will quote from the Operators Manual:
"Biodiesel Fuel must be purchased from a trusted supplier that understands the product and maintains good fuel quality."
Also:
"Engine performance is affected by the use of Biodiesel Fuel. There may be up to 12 percent reduction in power or torque depending on the blend used.

NOTICE: DO NOT modify the engine and/or injection pump settings to recover reduced performance.
The reduced power must be accepted if using any Biodiesel Fuel.

Some modifications may be required to allow your engine to run Biodiesel Fuel. Consult your dealer for complete information on these modifications.

NOTICE: The use of high Biodiesel Fuel blends are not recommended in cold weather conditions."


I do not use Biodiesel Fuel or plan to use it.
 

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Best keep a careful eye on the fuel pumps. Might be surprised on the number of ones that sell bio diesel. Personally I am just hoping there labeled correctly and not leaving off the stickers at times.
 

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I think I am going to puke...........this mess about all the fuel makes me sick to think what might be going into my tractors/vehicles - after going through what we just went through I hope the new place we are getting it is honest and posting labels correctly and not getting fuel that someone is slipping under their noses -
 
  
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klancf51

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I think I am going to puke...........this mess about all the fuel makes me sick to think what might be going into my tractors/vehicles - after going through what we just went through I hope the new place we are getting it is honest and posting labels correctly and not getting fuel that someone is slipping under their noses -

I feel for you. If you're in Missouri, try contacting the Missouri Department of Agriculture Fuel Quality Program. They may be able to direct you to a supplier that has access to distillate fuel laboratory tests results done at the fuel terminals. There are good suppliers out there who care about fuel quality more than we. Our supplier is Luther P. Miller Inc.: they provide us with the fuel test reports so that we know what we are buying and whether additives are required for the fuel to meet DIN EN590. Until we found them all we could do was guess and worry if were guessing rightly. I hope you get it resolved.

By the way, that Missouri Fuel Quality Program looks pretty good - take advantage. Best luck.
 

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I've looked into this a lot. The fuel producers (e.g. Gulf Oil) test their products at their terminals. My best advice is try to find a ULSD retailer who can obtain the terminal Distillate Fuel Laboratory Report and the HFRR test result. From this you can determine precisely which additive best and most economically addresses your needs for lubricity, cetane, emulsification/emulsification, pour point, etc. You may find you don't really need an additive.

However, if I had to choose an additive without the benefit of a Distillate Fuel Laboratory Report or HFRR test, I would select Opti-Lube XPD. Based on my research, it's clearly the best ULSD additive for my European diesel engine.

However, one of the biggest reasons I use the additive besides lubricity is that I live in New Hampshire and I don't want my fuel gellin' in the winter so I just add it to every can of fuel after I buy it and I never have to worry about it.
 

TractorNH

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You didn't read the article on LinkedIn did you? Some references are there. Opti-Lube commissioned and published the 2014 Intertek HFRR test per ASTM D6079. The science appears to support Opti-Lube's nitrogen addition approach and the results of the 2014 Intertek HFRR test. I believe that's how they are able to achieve it - it's remarkable, in my opinion.

If Opti-Lube commissioned and published the "study" then of course it is going to point to a conclusion that their product is better. Reality is that any of the others are at the very least good enough...Power Service, Howes, etc.
 

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If Opti-Lube commissioned and published the "study" then of course it is going to point to a conclusion that their product is better. Reality is that any of the others are at the very least good enough...Power Service, Howes, etc.

They each conduct what's called "independent studies".
 
  
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If Opti-Lube commissioned and published the "study" then of course it is going to point to a conclusion that their product is better. Reality is that any of the others are at the very least good enough...Power Service, Howes, etc.

Intertek is an independent testing service that performs fuel lubricity testing per ASTM D6079. The 2014 Intertek HFRR test does not claim Opti-Lube products are "better"; the report of analysis is simply presented. The results happen to be impressive. So what exactly are you claiming? That Opti-Lube and Intertek conspired to run an ASTM standardized test in a way that provided a result better than the actual result? Do you have any proof of that? I'd love to see it!

I accept the 2014 Intertek HFRR test result. I also accept the ASTM D6079 test results run by the terminal that provides fuel to my supplier. I am relying on their representations of their products. What else do I have to go on? Do I just listen to people who say "Throw some Diesel Kleen in there! It's as good as anything."?

As for the others being "at the very least good enough", what is "good enough"? Depending on the lubricity of the base fuel, perhaps they aren't "good enough" to improve lubricity to meet DIN EN 590. When I see ASTM D6079 data from Power Service or Howse, I may conclude that they are "good enough" for my unit. I haven't seen it.
 
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Now I'm wondering: if you left 2 ounces of 100% pure ULSD in a quart bottle for 2 months in a pickup truck, would you really be surprised to find a microbe bloom in the bottom? Would you think the 100% ULSD originally had algae in it?

Maybe there's an explanation. ULSD is hydroscopic. Hydroscopic products require care in storage and handling to prevent excessive water absorption. Microbes occur everywhere and it doesn't take much water in ULSD to give them the opportunity to establish. This is well-known. It's very likely that some of the compounds in Opti-Lube products are also hydroscopic. If so, then it wouldn't be surprising to find microbe growth in water surrounding Opti-Lube. The microbe growth doesn't make Opti-Lube "mostly biodiesel", not does it mean it has "algae in it". It means it was contaminated by water.

Btw, the Opti-Lube XPD SDS lists the product content.
 
  
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Now I'm wondering: if you left 2 ounces of 100% pure ULSD in a quart bottle for 2 months in a pickup truck, would you really be surprised to find a microbe bloom in the bottom? Would you think the 100% ULSD originally had algae in it?

Maybe there's an explanation. ULSD is hygroscopic. Hygroscopic products require care in storage and handling to prevent excessive water absorption. Microbes occur everywhere and it doesn't take much water in ULSD to give them the opportunity to establish. This is well-known. It's very likely that some of the compounds in Opti-Lube products are also hydroscopic. If so, then it wouldn't be surprising to find microbe growth in water surrounding Opti-Lube. The microbe growth doesn't make Opti-Lube "mostly biodiesel", not does it mean it has "algae in it". It means it was contaminated by water.

Btw, the Opti-Lube XPD SDS lists the product content.

Meant to write "hygroscopic", not "hydroscopic". Sorry for not correcting the post.
 

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so how is it possible that about 8 yrs ago my aunt says hey your uncle has a fuel barrel with diesel fuel in it, do you all need it for burn piles. i said he died about 10 yrs ago and she said yes .........he was sick the last 2 yrs and confined indoors so the fuel was AT LEAST 12 yrs old minimum - I said well we could use that old fuel for brush fires etc and get rid of it for you.

Well, the 300 gallon stand barrel was 3/4 full, we got at least 200 gallons out of it. we got the fuel out and looked at it and it was that old oily diesel I grew up on - it wasn't soured or nasty and we put some in a glass miracle whip jar and it looked good, we used every bit of it in my buddies tractor and never had an issue with it, how come this new stuff is so sensitive to things or were we just lucky that stuff had been in that barrel for 12 to 15 yrs and it was still good?
 

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give me more sulfur, heck I went to Yellowstone and they let all that smelly sulfur stink up the park why cant we have more in our diesel lol
 

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At one time they thought sulfur was a cure all.......they thought that about lead and asbestos too.
 

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that's why we have chelation therapy it works for more than was ever originally thought
 

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I bought gasoline at the local Wally's. My Stihl dealer tested the gravity and it was just over 30% ethanol. He even correctly guessed where I bought it.

I think my single sourced supply is good. But, if I can't count on good labeling, how do I know I have enough lubricity? If adding some snake oil supplies the compound that is missing from my diesel that kills the shelf life, how do I guess correctly? Coin toss or children's rhyme?

I guess I should just rig up a 10 mic and 2 mic spin on and routinely polish my fuel? Maybe I add a centrifuge and a UV sterilizer? I am not sure if I am kidding or not. It is possible to add a sump, tilt my tank, and add an interval timer to a 120v or 12v gear pump.

I have never considered so much trouble but the new engines seem to be pickier. Or, fuel crappier. Or, both.
 

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I bought gasoline at the local Wally's. My Stihl dealer tested the gravity and it was just over 30% ethanol. He even correctly guessed where I bought it.

I think my single sourced supply is good. But, if I can't count on good labeling, how do I know I have enough lubricity? If adding some snake oil supplies the compound that is missing from my diesel that kills the shelf life, how do I guess correctly? Coin toss or children's rhyme?
I would contact the TX Department of Ag and report them: Regulatory and Pesticide Feedback Form They cannot legally sell fuel with more than 10% ethanol.

Aaron Z
 

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Good question. The answer is: adding ATF to ULSD could actually damage modern diesel emissions components. The post recommending ATF as a ULSD additive should be deleted.

There are some people who think ATF is some sort of cure all miracle elixir and they want to add it to everything except breakfast .
 
  
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klancf51

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so how is it possible that about 8 yrs ago my aunt says hey your uncle has a fuel barrel with diesel fuel in it, do you all need it for burn piles. i said he died about 10 yrs ago and she said yes .........he was sick the last 2 yrs and confined indoors so the fuel was AT LEAST 12 yrs old minimum - I said well we could use that old fuel for brush fires etc and get rid of it for you.

Well, the 300 gallon stand barrel was 3/4 full, we got at least 200 gallons out of it. we got the fuel out and looked at it and it was that old oily diesel I grew up on - it wasn't soured or nasty and we put some in a glass miracle whip jar and it looked good, we used every bit of it in my buddies tractor and never had an issue with it, how come this new stuff is so sensitive to things or were we just lucky that stuff had been in that barrel for 12 to 15 yrs and it was still good?

"how come this new stuff is so sensitive to things...?"
One of the reasons I started this thread in this Owning/Operating forum was to share my article and raise the level of awareness of the importance of ULSD fuel quality in modern HPCR direct injection diesel engines. These new diesel engines utilize technology far, far advanced from that used even 10 years ago. When you notice a leak, you check it with safety glasses, gloves and a 2-3 foot strip of cardboard because the pump pressure is so high (20,000 - 30,000 psi) that an invisible leak can inject a load of diesel fuel deep into your skin before you even realize it. The pump pistons & fuel injector nozzles are high-precision parts; the pump pistons are so precise that they can't be held by hand for measuring because the heat from a human hand will significantly affect the measurement! In terms of the fuel and emissions systems, these HPRC engines share little in common with older diesels and that includes the fuel: ULSD.
 

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"how come this new stuff is so sensitive to things...?"
One of the reasons I started this thread in this Owning/Operating forum was to share my article and raise the level of awareness of the importance of ULSD fuel quality in modern HPCR direct injection diesel engines. These new diesel engines utilize technology far, far advanced from that used even 10 years ago. When you notice a leak, you check it with safety glasses, gloves and a 2-3 foot strip of cardboard because the pump pressure is so high (20,000 - 30,000 psi) that an invisible leak can inject a load of diesel fuel deep into your skin before you even realize it. The pump pistons & fuel injector nozzles are high-precision parts; the pump pistons are so precise that they can't be held by hand for measuring because the heat from a human hand will significantly affect the measurement! In terms of the fuel and emissions systems, these HPRC engines share little in common with older diesels and that includes the fuel: ULSD.

Ouch! 5000 psi from a paint sprayer will cut you.

I read your article and the Chevron piece. I read some other stuff. It wasn't exactly good news. The model of newest machine I work with was discontinued in 2002. I had no clue stuff was so fiddly now.

If I upgrade to a spin on two filter 10 mic and 2 micron rig, would that be enough? I could regularly pump diesel into the other fitting on the tank even when I don't need to fill anything. It would be like polishing the diesel, right?
 
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Ouch! 5000 psi from a paint sprayer will cut you.

I read your article and the Chevron piece. I read some other stuff. It wasn't exactly good news. The model of newest machine I work with was discontinued in 2002. I had no clue stuff was so fiddly now.

If I upgrade to a spin on two filter 10 mic and 2 micron rig, would that be enough? I could regularly pump diesel into the other fitting on the tank even when I don't need to fill anything. It would be like polishing the diesel, right?

Yes, it will be better then most fuel you can purchase at a truck stop.
While the new common rail systems are a bit fussier about fuel quality then the older mechanical injection systems they are not rocket science.
This new ULSD is going into the same pumping systems, tanks and dispensing equipment as was used 10 years ago.
The final filters at your service station if you are lucky are 10-25 micron and not changed that often.
Look at the water dirt and grit that gets introduced to all the new diesel pickups when being refilled, that's why we have filters prior to our injection pumps.
Yes, the new fuels does not have the sulfur for a high pressure lubricant.
Very few people that I know of have that much info from there fuel suppliers,
I have never seen cloud point info at any pump were I have filled my pickup up at.
 
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Jul 9, 2018
Messages
163
Location
Central Texas
Tractor
Bobcat 873 skid steer
Yes, it will be better then most fuel you can purchase at a truck stop.
While the new common rail systems are a bit fussier about fuel quality then the older mechanical injection systems they are not rocket science.
This new ULSD is going into the same pumping systems, tanks and dispensing equipment as was used 10 years ago.
The final filters at your service station if you are lucky are 10-25 micron and not changed that often.
Look at the water dirt and grit that gets introduced to all the new diesel pickups when being refilled, that's why we have filters prior to our injection pumps.
Yes, the new fuels does not have the sulfur for a high pressure lubricant.
Very few people that I know of have that much info from there fuel suppliers,
I have never seen cloud point info at any pump were I have filled my pickup up at.

My understanding is each source of crude yields a slightly different batch of products. Stuff gets mixed in common tanks, pipelines, tanks, transports, tanks again, transports again, my tank, and my equipment. No way anyone is testing often enough close enough to the "last tank" or "last transport" to do me much good.

What I need is some foolproof way to guarantee cleanliness and lubricity. Filters (esp. Spin on) are cheap. Small tanks for more frequent rotation is cheap. Inconvenient but cheap. Replacing the old injector parts was expensive. I shudder to think about the picky new equipment.

Would 2% biodiesel and frequent 10 mic/2 mic filtering reasonably prevent problems and allow for different batches and blends? Cold temps are not really a problem here. Humidity? Yes. Dirt and heat and age I have some control over.
 
   #46  

Snobdds

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2016
Messages
2,150
Location
Wyoming
Tractor
MF gc1710, Cat 305C
My understanding is each source of crude yields a slightly different batch of products. Stuff gets mixed in common tanks, pipelines, tanks, transports, tanks again, transports again, my tank, and my equipment. No way anyone is testing often enough close enough to the "last tank" or "last transport" to do me much good.

What I need is some foolproof way to guarantee cleanliness and lubricity. Filters (esp. Spin on) are cheap. Small tanks for more frequent rotation is cheap. Inconvenient but cheap. Replacing the old injector parts was expensive. I shudder to think about the picky new equipment.

Would 2% biodiesel and frequent 10 mic/2 mic filtering reasonably prevent problems and allow for different batches and blends? Cold temps are not really a problem here. Humidity? Yes. Dirt and heat and age I have some control over.

Are you even having problems or are you just preemptively worrying?

I have not had a single fuel problem in any of my modern diesel motors that are common rail.

Dirt is the least of my worries...it's water that will kill a high pressure common rail faster than anything. That is easily solved with buying from a high volume seller and using treatments to emulsify the water...

These High Pressure fuel systems are really not that fragile...
 
   #47  

Lelandwelds

Silver Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2018
Messages
163
Location
Central Texas
Tractor
Bobcat 873 skid steer
I think what I really want is a perfect for all blends and situations snake oil. Lubricity is my main concern. Fungicide is a distant second. I think 10mic/2 mic filtering will fix all the other problems.
 
   #48  

Snobdds

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2016
Messages
2,150
Location
Wyoming
Tractor
MF gc1710, Cat 305C
I think what I really want is a perfect for all blends and situations snake oil. Lubricity is my main concern. Fungicide is a distant second. I think 10mic/2 mic filtering will fix all the other problems.

Why is Lubricity your main concern? Common rail use Piezo injectors, which have no internal piston that needs lubricating. The high pressure oil injection systems, found on CAT and Navistar engines needed the lubricating properties, and even those are not having issues with the low sulfur diesel.

I think you should do what you can to mitigate the water issue if you're buying from low volume sellers, otherwise there is no need to worry.
 
   #49  

Lelandwelds

Silver Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2018
Messages
163
Location
Central Texas
Tractor
Bobcat 873 skid steer
Are you even having problems or are you just preemptively worrying?

I have not had a single fuel problem in any of my modern diesel motors that are common rail.

Dirt is the least of my worries...it's water that will kill a high pressure common rail faster than anything. That is easily solved with buying from a high volume seller and using treatments to emulsify the water...

These High Pressure fuel systems are really not that fragile...

Preemptive worrying is a chronic hobby of mine. I can buy nice toys but unexpected major repairs take years to really recover. The current toy is about a 1998 (?) Bobcat. It has had increasing common and expensive repairs but nailing down the exact cause is difficult. My reading about other owners problems and concerns is alarming and hopelessly complicated my search. But, depending on buying order, the tractor purchase is two to seven years out. I have time to not rush into something.

I want to move away from the Bobcat except for high power tasks. Repairing turf and swinging my rear-end into stuff will not be missed.
 
   #50  

DieselBound

Elite Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2016
Messages
3,275
Location
Arlington, WA
Tractor
Kubota B7800; Kioti NX5510HC
Yes, water is the biggest concern. I buy my bulk diesel (off-road) from a local Chevron distributor. My tank has a regular debris filter (which also has token water separating abilities) and a water filter. All my equipment has additional filtration abilities for water: interestingly, and I had a bit of a go-round with the dealer, my Kioti is the ONLY piece of equipment that I've found water in its fuel (trapped in the fuel filter); thousands of gallons of on-road in my diesel cars and I've never found a trace of water in their filters.

CR also uses high pressure pumps to charge the fuel rails. Such pumps, owing to their high pressure, require very tight tolerances. After lots of reading on CR failures on first generation CR VWs I am convinced that what was killing them was water: pressures would flash water and cause hot spots that would expand metals, thus causing pump failures. I'm sure that debris doesn't do them any good either, but, and this is my take, this is more likely to cause degradation of performance than a more instantaneous (shrapnel-producing) failure.

It was my understanding that most manufacturers didn't make recommendations for fuel additives. One can use this either FOR or AGAINST adding additives (for whatever reason).
 
 
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