What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf?

   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #31  

RalphVa

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I took the R14s because of current supply situation. Have had R4s since 2013 with absolutely NO problems. Only 2 hours so far on the R14s.

Had turfs on the 1st tractor for 9 years. No problems with rears but lots with the fronts. Just not strong enough for FEL work. They have a better side grip than R4s. Mess up grass on turns worse.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #32  

GeneV

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Lake County, IL
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Bradley 48" stander MF GC1710
I'll go on record saying my R4's suck in snow. No lateral traction in snow/ice
Our parking area is on a slope, get a layer of packed down snow/ice and the tractor just slides sideways down the hill.
Can barely back up without sideways sliding down the hill, let alone trying to push a 9' snowplow
Well I can't speak about driving lateral on a steep snowed slope, other than to say that I don't think turfs would do much better there.

But I will say one other thing about people who complain about R4's in snow...they likely have their tires inflated to max pressure rating. Tires inflated to max, and don't know how to use 4wd and locking differential, that's usually the types who bitch about R4's in snow.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #33  

GeneV

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I’m ok with the R4’s they sure are tough and easy on the lawn. Ride pretty rough when roading especially when it’s cold outside. I’d consider R14’s I think there’s some YT videos on the comparison.
Lowering the pressure helps there too.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #34  

LouNY

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Heck my rear R1's are at about 13 PSI.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #35  

John_Mc

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Never seen a new tractor with those, can you get [R14 tires] from the factory with a new tractor, or have to order after..

The local Kubota/NEw Holland dealer has R14 tires on some of their Kubota compact tractors. Apparently, Kubota had some sort of exclusive OEM deal with Titan/Goodyear when they first came out. You could buy them aftermarket as well, but Kubota had a lock on the OEM production at least initially. R14s have been out for a while now, so maybe that has changed.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #36  

John_Mc

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I use R4 tires on my tractor because they are tougher construction than the R1 tires I've been able to find in my size. R4 tires especially tend to have tougher sidewall rubber. The main use for my tractor is working in the woods in rocky, hilly terrain. Logging in those conditions can be hard on tires. The rocks and sapling stumps are more likely to punch a hole in the the sidewall of an R1 tire than an R4 (the ply ratings mostly refer to the tread of the tire, not the sidewall).

My other uses are for grading our 1/4 mile driveway (where the R4 tires have plenty of traction) and snow removal on our 1/4 mile hilly driveway. I used bare R4 tires (filled, no chains) to clear our driveway when I lived in the flatlands of NW Ohio. They worked out OK there. When it comes to using them in the foothills of the Green Mountains here in Vermont, I'd have to say I agree with those who say they suck in snow - especially when you have enough hours on them to have rounded off the edges on the lugs. On icy hills, don't even bother trying. (And, contrary to what some may suggest, I'm well acquainted with the proper use of 4WD and locking differentials. I'd just love to stand by and watch while you attempt to use your superior skills to get up my driveway. I'll try not to laugh too hard.) When the wrong conditions have set in, you can't get up the main hill in my driveway with the bare R4 tires even when you are not pushing snow. I dealt with those traction issues by running Euro-style studded chains on my rear tires and steering with the brakes when necessary. I like the chains enough that I use them in the woods for more than just winter use.

Since my R4 tires are nearing the end of their life, I've started exploring R14. They may have the traction to avoid the need for chains in some conditions, particularly in the woods (Though I'm betting I'll still need them on ice.)

I did exchange a few emails with an R&D guy at Titan about the R14 tires. I asked about whether my chains for my R4 15 x 19.5 tires were likely to also fit the R14 tires in that size. I also asked about the relative toughness of the tires, particularly in the sidewalls. His responses:
I will say I believe your chains will fit the R14T. When I looked at the chain information on the OFA website they only show chain sizes based on tire size. I have no way of knowing absolutely they will fit, but again I believe they will.
As to the toughness of the tire I would say they are identical also and in that respect will perform the same. You will need to decide whether the differences in the tread patterns will help you especially when logging your acreage.

The sidewall rubber and sidewall thickness are similar on both tires and I would expect the same performance.

I'm still hoping to talk to a user in my area who uses his tractor similarly to how I do before I get to the point where I have to actually place the order. However, that's an encouraging initial look.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #37  

airbiscuit

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I'll go on record saying my R4's suck in snow. No lateral traction in snow/ice
Our parking area is on a slope, get a layer of packed down snow/ice and the tractor just slides sideways down the hill.
Can barely back up without sideways sliding down the hill, let alone trying to push a 9' snowplow

Had a few in the past with R4's and found they were terrible on packed snow or ice.
They slide sideways because the bars are too straight across the tire. Simple physics. They are like hard rubber "skates" sideways on ice.
Found I could plow better with a pickup than tractor with R-4's if there was any ice or packed slippery snow.
R-1s are not perfect, but much better than R-4s.
With R-1's you wont need chains and the 45 degree bars help against sliding sideways. The deeper/angled paddles pull so much better through snow.
When I had a tractor with R4s, they turned into racing slicks in greasy snow. My R1s are much better. I've seen a lot of new Kiotis with R14s.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #38  

GeneV

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Lake County, IL
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I use R4 tires on my tractor because they are tougher construction than the R1 tires I've been able to find in my size. R4 tires especially tend to have tougher sidewall rubber. The main use for my tractor is working in the woods in rocky, hilly terrain. Logging in those conditions can be hard on tires. The rocks and sapling stumps are more likely to punch a hole in the the sidewall of an R1 tire than an R4 (the ply ratings mostly refer to the tread of the tire, not the sidewall).

My other uses are for grading our 1/4 mile driveway (where the R4 tires have plenty of traction) and snow removal on our 1/4 mile hilly driveway. I used bare R4 tires (filled, no chains) to clear our driveway when I lived in the flatlands of NW Ohio. They worked out OK there. When it comes to using them in the foothills of the Green Mountains here in Vermont, I'd have to say I agree with those who say they suck in snow - especially when you have enough hours on them to have rounded off the edges on the lugs. On icy hills, don't even bother trying. (And, contrary to what some may suggest, I'm well acquainted with the proper use of 4WD and locking differentials. I'd just love to stand by and watch while you attempt to use your superior skills to get up my driveway. I'll try not to laugh too hard.) When the wrong conditions have set in, you can't get up the main hill in my driveway with the bare R4 tires even when you are not pushing snow. I dealt with those traction issues by running Euro-style studded chains on my rear tires and steering with the brakes when necessary. I like the chains enough that I use them in the woods for more than just winter use.

Since my R4 tires are nearing the end of their life, I've started exploring R14. They may have the traction to avoid the need for chains in some conditions, particularly in the woods (Though I'm betting I'll still need them on ice.)

I did exchange a few emails with an R&D guy at Titan about the R14 tires. I asked about whether my chains for my R4 15 x 19.5 tires were likely to also fit the R14 tires in that size. I also asked about the relative toughness of the tires, particularly in the sidewalls. His responses:



I'm still hoping to talk to a user in my area who uses his tractor similarly to how I do before I get to the point where I have to actually place the order. However, that's an encouraging initial look.
Lower your tire pressure.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #39  

John_Mc

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Lower your tire pressure.
My rears are at 20 PSI now (filled). I've tried as low as 15, but it made no difference. I've also run the chalk test, and am satisfied with the contact patch I'm getting. The wear pattern on the tires (which now have 1500+ hours on them) also indicates a history of good inflation pressures.

The bare tires work great on dry ground or even somewhat soft/wet (I don't go out in my woods when it's really sloppy out). In snow, going forward on level ground or straight up a slight incline, they are just "OK". Hardpacked snow or ice, or snow on top of those conditions is another matter entirely. I can get around if the slope is not too great, but there is not a chance of pushing snow off the hills in our driveway. In bad conditions, even the slight crown in the driveway is enough to start the tractor slipping sideways. It was slightly better when the tires were new, and still had some edges on the lugs, but not much. As it is now, our cars get up and down the hills better than a tractor with R4 tires: AWD minivan w/snow tires, AWD Subaru with studded snows, 2WD Chevy Bolt with studded snows). The Tacoma with "All Season" tires has to be in 4WD to make it up if there is much of anything on the driveway.

If your bare R4 tires are working well for you in the winter, that's great. They just aren't cutting the mustard here. Perhaps our definition of "sucks in snow" differs. I doubt I'd be happy with bare R1, R3, or R4 in the wintertime, though I have seem where Turf is a bit better on bare ice, and Ag tires can sometime power through deeper snow than my bare R4 tires.

I still like the R4 tires for the type of work I do, but for ice and snow, I'll keep my chains, thanks. It beats being stuck out in the woods a mile from home on a cold winter day, or just spinning my wheels when clearing the driveway, or only doing snow removal in a downhill direction and hoping that I keep it on the road, because if I slide off, there is little chance I'm going to be able to back out uphill with bare R4 tires.
 
   / What tires should you get on a new Tractor, R1, R4, or Turf? #40  

Hay Dude

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I use R4 tires on my tractor because they are tougher construction than the R1 tires I've been able to find in my size. R4 tires especially tend to have tougher sidewall rubber. The main use for my tractor is working in the woods in rocky, hilly terrain. Logging in those conditions can be hard on tires. The rocks and sapling stumps are more likely to punch a hole in the the sidewall of an R1 tire than an R4 (the ply ratings mostly refer to the tread of the tire, not the sidewall).

My other uses are for grading our 1/4 mile driveway (where the R4 tires have plenty of traction) and snow removal on our 1/4 mile hilly driveway. I used bare R4 tires (filled, no chains) to clear our driveway when I lived in the flatlands of NW Ohio. They worked out OK there. When it comes to using them in the foothills of the Green Mountains here in Vermont, I'd have to say I agree with those who say they suck in snow - especially when you have enough hours on them to have rounded off the edges on the lugs. On icy hills, don't even bother trying. (And, contrary to what some may suggest, I'm well acquainted with the proper use of 4WD and locking differentials. I'd just love to stand by and watch while you attempt to use your superior skills to get up my driveway. I'll try not to laugh too hard.) When the wrong conditions have set in, you can't get up the main hill in my driveway with the bare R4 tires even when you are not pushing snow. I dealt with those traction issues by running Euro-style studded chains on my rear tires and steering with the brakes when necessary. I like the chains enough that I use them in the woods for more than just winter use.

Since my R4 tires are nearing the end of their life, I've started exploring R14. They may have the traction to avoid the need for chains in some conditions, particularly in the woods (Though I'm betting I'll still need them on ice.)

I did exchange a few emails with an R&D guy at Titan about the R14 tires. I asked about whether my chains for my R4 15 x 19.5 tires were likely to also fit the R14 tires in that size. I also asked about the relative toughness of the tires, particularly in the sidewalls. His responses:



I'm still hoping to talk to a user in my area who uses his tractor similarly to how I do before I get to the point where I have to actually place the order. However, that's an encouraging initial look.
I just got done 4 days straight of driving over logs and stumps with R1’s carry logs and brush in my grapple.
No sidewall damage, no flats.
They make heavier R1’s for that type of work you know?

1644238488015.png


Heres actual log skidder tractor photos
These look a heck of a lot more like R-1s than R-4s

1644239500274.jpeg


1644238755745.jpeg


R-4s are great for use on pavement and compacted soils. R-1 s will do anything R-4s will except last as long on hard surfaces.
Conversely, R-4s will not do nearly as many tasks as well as R-1s.

For the average small tractor and hobbyist not going into deep mud or deep snow, R-4s are fine.
However, I can’t understand why anyone would want a tractor, being used for it’s true intent, which is traction, not having R-1’s. They enhance the tractors traction and utilize more of its pulling power. They sort of give you more drawbar HP which is what you want for pulling or pushing things
 
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