Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim?

   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #1  

SmallChange

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667
Tractor
New Holland WM25 with 200LC front end loader, filled R4 tires 43X16.00-20 and 25X8.50-14 (had a Kubota B6200D with dozer and R1 tires)
Seems like it'd be easier to put chains on tires if they were separate segments, and each one anchored to points on the rim. You'd only have to adjust one at a time, not try to shift everything around on the tire with part of it pinned down.

Are there any like this?
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #4  
Seems like it'd be easier to put chains on tires if they were separate segments, and each one anchored to points on the rim. You'd only have to adjust one at a time, not try to shift everything around on the tire with part of it pinned down.

Are there any like this?

I jack the wheel clear of the ground and then I can rotate the wheel/tire chain easily and not worry about it being pinned down. I mount a pair of chains on a set of 14.9-28s every winter.
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #5  
I'm with others about multiple segments of chain. Just means more ways for it to go wrong.

there is a topic about mounting chains, and since read it is the only way I mount chains.


I used to jack up the tractor, what a PITA that was manhandling the chains over the wheels.

Seriously, with the above method the chains are tight when they are ready to be fastened together.
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #6  
I've always laid them out in front of the tire, drive forward, hook them as tight as I can, go forward a couple of tire rotations and tighten again. I've logged many hundred hours without problems and many hundred pickup miles installing them the same way. I tried the method Hube2 mentions above but for my chains it's more hassle. For heavier chains though it seems like the cat's meow.
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #7  
I lay the chains out on an 18" wide by 8 foot long strip of plywood. I then lift the front tires off the ground with the FEL and slide the plywood underneath. For the rear, I use the BH stabilizers to raise the tires off the ground and repeat.

The plywood makes it easy to lay the chains out straight and orient them properly. This is especially helpful with cleated chains. I usually leave the tires off the ground while installing so they can be rotated by hand.
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #8  
Seems like it'd be easier to put chains on tires if they were separate segments, and each one anchored to points on the rim. You'd only have to adjust one at a time, not try to shift everything around on the tire with part of it pinned down.

Are there any like this?

Don't know...I haven't seen any that hook up that way. Some rims have holes in them. Maybe the holes could be used in some fashion, although they might need a hard rubber insert in the hole to prevent metal-on-metal wear.

I do know that in our old front wheel drive family car - a Saab - we didn't use chains because it was a highway car. But I did keep a couple of pieces of rope in the trunk and used them to get through deep snow by winding rope around as much of the tire as I could reach and through the holes in the wheel.

Maybe you have something & maybe not. Why don't you make up some - use them for a season - and report back?

Everyone who uses chains seems to have a favorite method.
rScotty
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim? #9  
Strap on chains such as these have been around for many years:


They might work on small front tractor tires with slotted rims but I doubt they would last very long.
 
   / Why don't they sell chains that attach in segments to holes in the rim?
  • Thread Starter
#10  
Maybe you have something & maybe not. Why don't you make up some - use them for a season - and report back?

Everyone who uses chains seems to have a favorite method.

Sadly, there aren't any holes through my rims, and no attachment points other than the lug bolts themselves, which I'm apprehensive about trying to exploit. I'd have to start drilling. Which I could, I suppose, but I'm not quite at that point just yet.

If I happened to have holes already, I would give this a shot, easy.
 
 
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