Wooden bridge for 2000# tractor to cross creek

   #1  

kevininor

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Hello all! I have a property divided in half by a creek. There is currently a 20' bridge in-place with concrete footings at each end with two 6x12 timbers for the span. The timbers are 64 inches apart and the current deck is made from 2x6s. I need to replace the 2x6s as they've had a good life and flex under the weight my my little JD X330. I'm wondering if replacement 2x6 boards will work or if I'll need to upgrade to 4x6s to support the live weight of a compact tractor.

Thanks for any and all input.
 
   #2  

Menagerie-Manor

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Where are you in the world, anywhere near sawmills in lumber country. With the lumber prices being what they are for something like that I would probably source full dimension 2" thick or more Spruce planks.
 
   #4  

RalphVa

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I researched the building of a new bridge across a little 6-8 ft stream a couple years ago when we were having troubles in the wet 2018 keeping the underflow pipes clear under our present tractor crossing. Other tractor guys in our congregation said they've built bridges using 3 or 4 railroad ties. I figured on getting a boom and quick release thingies to pick them up and to put them across the stream. Weather dried up, and our present underflow crossing is working fine the last 2 years like it did for a number of years before that. Gave up on the idea of relocation.
 
   #5  

LouNY

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Many of the smaller wood decked bridges around here used 2x6's on edge for the deck.
These were then oiled and or tar and stoned over the tops.
Another option that I have seen used for bridging are large truck boxes, either dumps for narrower bridges or a pair of flat beds side by side for wider ones.
 
   #6  

deezler

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Here's my corona lockdown project from last year. Holding up perfectly so far.

 
  
  • Thread Starter
#7  
OP
K

kevininor

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Thanks for the replies. I'm in Eugene, Oregon so definitely in sawmill territory. The 2x6s look very weathered and, in general, the property hasn't been maintained for about 10 years. The current 2x6s are untreated, but flex so I don't think they're completely shot. I get zero movement for the 6x12 timbers so I'm inclined to think they're okay.
 
   #8  

dieselscout80

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You could add say 8" to 10" window/door flashing tape that covered the 6" face of the 6"x12" to prevent water from getting in them before replacing the 2"x6".
 
   #9  

bcp

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The problem for building a bridge for a 2000 pound tractor is that someday someone will drive an 8000 pound tractor or truck across it.

Maybe get something like this.


Bruce
 

Menagerie-Manor

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Brookings Oregon
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Thanks for the replies. I'm in Eugene, Oregon so definitely in sawmill territory. The 2x6s look very weathered and, in general, the property hasn't been maintained for about 10 years. The current 2x6s are untreated, but flex so I don't think they're completely shot. I get zero movement for the 6x12 timbers so I'm inclined to think they're okay.
If you can try and find a sawmill that can cut up some spruce for you, there is a mill in Drain just off the 5 you could try. Spruce is tough stuff and is traditionally used for scaffold planking and really takes a beating.
 
 
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