Wooden Fence Posts

   / Wooden Fence Posts #41  

toolslinger

Silver Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2013
Messages
104
Location
NJ / PA
Tractor
2x Case 646, 2x 8N, MF202, JD300, Case 444, MF 135, JD 140
If you're going to buy an auger anyhow, I'd lean toward just using that. Where I'm at, it's rock. Try to drive a 1" solid steel pin in anywhere, and 1/4 of the time, it will simple stop dead on a rock. 1/2 the time it will kick to the side. That last 1/4 they will go in. So we haven't done too much fence over the years. I did set 50 or so 12' pipes for dear fence around a garden, and that took a PHD I built for a Case garden tractor based on a Little Beaver PHD to get them down and in concrete. We still get complements on that install from the neighbors, who all well know the ground/fence situation here...

That said, if your ground will take a post via pounding, then I'd be looking for that system on the used market. Sell it off when you're done. You can always do the repairs on your line by hand or auger as they come up, and then you don't have a piece you're not going to be using just hanging around deteriorating.
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #42  

Torvy

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2021
Messages
2,461
Location
North East Texas
Tractor
Looking to purchase a Compact Tractor in 30-50 HP range.
Our fencing plan calls for a mix of tposts, with a wood post every 4th one, or so, and in the corners with a brace configuration. We will go with the auger. One of us on the tractor and the other lining it up. I've pounded t posts manually for smaller projects and even at 6'1", it can be a reach...not to mention the wear on my old body. I would consider a pounder, but the auger is more of a multitasker. We can also use it for planting trees and such.
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #43  

Spike56

Silver Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
203
Location
Lexington, Texas
Tractor
JD 2355
You guys that use augers, do you concrete them in or tamp them?

my vote is to hire a local fencer to pound them in.
I am not a "fence master", but have built a number of stretches over the years. FOR MY SOIL, I learned the hard way that you must concrete in the posts. I do not concrete in any *single* line posts (use a 4" every 3-4 T-posts), but if I include a bracer (2x4" with cross brace) in the line, I use some concrete. Of course, for the Corners... all are in concrete. After all the work to mark, drill, clean out the holes, I add some rock/gravel to the bottom prior to concreting them in.
If / When I did not do this, over a couple years, even the corners would move/lean. The clay soil I have is terrible in spots and swells / dries out and would move an 8" corner post without any concrete - and a MUST is get below the freeze line or the freeze thaw will push the post out.
It is a pain to dig the holes out after using the auger, add gravel to the bottom (making sure its below frost line) and then concrete. BUT, what is *way* worse is having to re-do it !
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #44  

Torvy

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2021
Messages
2,461
Location
North East Texas
Tractor
Looking to purchase a Compact Tractor in 30-50 HP range.
I am not a "fence master", but have built a number of stretches over the years. FOR MY SOIL, I learned the hard way that you must concrete in the posts. I do not concrete in any *single* line posts (use a 4" every 3-4 T-posts), but if I include a bracer (2x4" with cross brace) in the line, I use some concrete. Of course, for the Corners... all are in concrete. After all the work to mark, drill, clean out the holes, I add some rock/gravel to the bottom prior to concreting them in.
If / When I did not do this, over a couple years, even the corners would move/lean. The clay soil I have is terrible in spots and swells / dries out and would move an 8" corner post without any concrete - and a MUST is get below the freeze line or the freeze thaw will push the post out.
It is a pain to dig the holes out after using the auger, add gravel to the bottom (making sure its below frost line) and then concrete. BUT, what is *way* worse is having to re-do it !
You shouldn't have to worry about the frost line in Texas unless you are putting in really short posts. The rule of thumb is 1/3 of the length of post is buried (2' on a 6' post). The deepest frost lines in Texas are up in the Panhandle and those are only about a foot. So, if you use the standard depth, even on a 6' post, you are going to be well below the frost line. Frost line in Central Texas is closer to 5".
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #45  

Sawyer Rob

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Dec 5, 2014
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7,917
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Upper Mid West
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several brands
edit. If you go for the auger, make sure you have (or install) a PTO clutch. If you hit a big rock the auger stops. It is time consuming (shipping time) and frustrating changing a broken PTO shaft.
Why ?, everyone I've seen/used has the drive line, sheer bolt protected, and I've yet to sheer even one bolt on the PHD I have now.

I did sheer a few on the cheapo PHD I use to have though, that thing was a POS!

SR
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #46  

Spike56

Silver Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2019
Messages
203
Location
Lexington, Texas
Tractor
JD 2355
You shouldn't have to worry about the frost line in Texas unless you are putting in really short posts. The rule of thumb is 1/3 of the length of post is buried (2' on a 6' post). The deepest frost lines in Texas are up in the Panhandle and those are only about a foot. So, if you use the standard depth, even on a 6' post, you are going to be well below the frost line. Frost line in Central Texas is closer to 5".
Well, you may be correct on the frost line requirements in Central Texas. But, using an 8' post, I have found that (with the clay) it better be in concrete and at least 3' in the ground. Perhaps not so much for a freeze, but the amount of tension on the posts. So, I stand corrected about the frost line, although if you do not use concrete and the ground shrinks around the post (which it does when dried out) it *seems* to be able to get water and freeze near the bottom of the post ?
There are fences all around where they did not bury the post deep enough or use concrete that are leaning or being pushed up out of the ground. So, maybe I am over doing it, but replacing a corner post on barbed wire fences is a real pain. Last fence I contracted with someone to do metal corners - the best, but I do not have a portable welder and all the tools (torch...) to do that out in the field.
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #47  

jigs_n_fixtures

Platinum Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2021
Messages
583
Location
Salmon, Idaho
Tractor
TYM T233
If you have decent a timber supply, you could do jack fence. Just sits on top of the ground. Very common heart, as the ground is mostly big rocks with smaller rockets and clay. Digging or driving is impossible, and Lodge Pole Pines are very common and available.

It is readily visible to the animals, and you can see the property line for decades, even if it falls down.

labor intensive, but low cost if you have the suitable trees and are doing it your self.

And if your paying to board the horses at $1100/month it might be worth hiring a pro and getting it done quickly. If it cost $12,000, pay off is only 11-months.
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #48  

Kschwennsen

Silver Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2014
Messages
119
Location
Mondovi, WI
Tractor
John Deere Z530M and 4105
Soft maybe the tractor will push them down or try something like this
I like that but I have a receiver tube on my mask. I think I would just mount one of those pounders (or capped tube) with a hinge to a shank and pin it into the receiver tube. Great idea though, I love it and will be doing it!!!
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #49  

grymmm1234

New member
Joined
Oct 11, 2018
Messages
1
Tractor
Kubota L35
New member, & First Post. I’ve searched the forums, but it seems like I’ll need some time looking around before I know where to look. I’m looking to put in a couple hundred wooden fence posts, and am not interested in pounding them in by hand (I know, I’m lazy) , and feel that an auger is probably more then I need. What about a bale spear or a hollow piece of well casing pipe fastened to the FEL , would the down pressure of the loader (maybe some ballast weight in the bucket) be enough to push the spike or casing into the ground so I could then push a sharpened wooden post in?

Thanks in advance, and don’t worry about hurting my feelings…. I’m a total newbie to farming

I live in southwest Oklahoma. It is very dry here, really almost in a continual state of drought. Therefore, the ground is extremely hard. By fence posts, I am assuming you mean t posts. When I had a couple hundred of those to put in I used a pressure washer and drove the nozzle down into the ground and then put the t post in right after and kicked some dirt over it. I had a 35 horsepower Kubota with a bucket, and all it did was lift the tractor up off the ground when I tried to use the bucket to drive the t posts in the ground. When I used the pressure washer, The t post went in with just one or two whacks of a t post setter. Had to run a bunch of hose to make that happen, but it was well worth it. Best of luck.
 
   / Wooden Fence Posts #50  

Clyde51

New member
Joined
Aug 10, 2019
Messages
6
Tractor
John Deere 1050, Kioti RX 6010
I just paid a installer $5 a post to drive in posts. At that price it would cost $1,000 for 200 post. It was a lot more enjoyable to sit back, drink a beer, and watch someone else do the work. Of course then I had to stretch the no climb wire and add a top rail. Makes for a nice horse fence.
 
 
 
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