Beautiful Barns

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Restored Horse Barn

Barns have a long and storied history, and have long been more than just a place to store equipment and goods, or house animals. It is a building to be decorated and modified to fit the individual lifestyle of the owner, and can often function as a meeting house, wedding reception hall, or a place for an enjoyable barn party. Barns fall into many different categories, and can be built from almost any material, from metal to wood, stone, and more. So what are some of the beautiful and impressive barns our users have built, own, or have found in their travels?

HorseshoeBarn

Member jmessing spotted this restored horse barn in Vermont. What a beauty!

Prev1 of 21

Restored Horse Barn

26 Comments

  • I was wondering if I could add a barn picture.I just recently completed my barn an I would like to submit a picture. Thanks

  • William, we’d love for you to share pictures of your barn and any stories you have about the building process on a thread on our message board. This would give all of our members the opportunity to ask questions and discuss it. Thanks!

  • Now this is a barn. The earth ramp is both functional and economical.

  • Would love to see some specific construction/material information on how one might duplicate some of the beauties shown here.

  • Please send me your email address so I may send you a photo of our barn.

  • As a lad I worked with my Grandfather who was a renowned North West Wisconsin barn builder. I would never trade those years for anything. I got the nickname Davey Lloyd Wright after the famed architect of the fifties era when I got to experience the technology of Cantilever construction used in many of the hillside barns we built. Round top roofs, Manson Ohio Barns and large milking parlors bring back the memories. That is now a sixty year memory but each and every year I go North and refresh it with a tour of the barns I was a part of building. My Grandfather used to say, Barns reveal the personality of the farmer. His house, well, perhaps his spouse !

  • galaxie428, your barn is beautiful and my favorite. I liked them all compared to my 10×12 and 10×10 but they work for this town boy.

  • This barn owned by galaxie428, “We particularly love the earthen ramp with stone walls”.
    I always liked the old style barns, w/ the rough cut oak
    wood usually from the trees on the same property the barn was built. I’am fortunate enough to have such a
    barn, and after all these years I’m still amazed by the workmanship, and the very large hayloft.

  • Great shots of the barns. Who says you can’t be stylish as a farmer?

    I’d like to send a pic of my barn that I rebuilt as well. Stores my Kioti 30HST with backhoe and bucket and has a work shop and two parts/storage rooms. I also have a tiller, bush hog, box scraper, forks and blade for my tractor but it all won’t fit in the barn… so it goes in my matching 3 bay carriage shed.

  • all very nice barns, like the wood/stone construction better, but all do the job of ‘cover’.. thanks for the photos..

  • would like to send you photo of our old barn, need an email address to do so.

  • Hi Drew,

    Great barn photos. We would love to post pictures of our new renovated barn if possible. Let me know if you are taking more submissions.
    Thanks!

    Brian

  • I love Barns!
    I turned a small dairy barn in Lake Geneva , WI into a house

  • They had to outlaw the round barns in Pennsylvania. . . They stored round hay bales in them, and soon found the cows were starving because they couldn’t get a square meal!

  • Loved seeing the barns. I hope you can share more in the future!

  • The title was “21 BEAUTIFUL Barns”…true,beauty is in the eye of the beholder….BUT—-these metal boxes might be VERY efficient and less costly to build but for my money they are any and everything but “beautiful”…..

  • The “lead” photo in this gallery, of the restored horse barn really got my attention, as it is in Vermont, and I am well acquainted with it. My daughter chose to be married right there, between the two ramps. It is the Horseshoe Barn at the Shelburne Museum….https://shelburnemuseum.org/collection/horseshoe-barn/

  • This is unlikely a “English barn”. Barns of that genera ALWAYS had the barn doors on the eaves side of the barn. The barn was generally divided into three bays, with a cow tie up bay on the warmest face of the barn, a central threshing floor, and a hay mow bay on the side opposite the cow tie up. The entire frame was designed with that in mind. Any barns with gable entry doors were either more modern or reconfigured older barns. The shed additions on either side of this barn may have forced a new entry.

  • Gotta love the turkey decorations above the end doors!

  • I doubt this is a Horse Barn for several reasons. The main one is the Emu or Ostrich above the big doors. Also 2 floors and not enough windows.
    Very nicely constructed.

  • As I pointed out, back in 2019, this barn is located at the Shelburne Museum, in Shelburne, VT.

    “The ‘lead’ photo in this gallery, of the restored horse barn really got my attention, as it is in Vermont, and I am well acquainted with it. My daughter chose to be married right there, between the two ramps. It is the Horseshoe Barn at the Shelburne Museum…( https://shelburnemuseum.org/collection/horseshoe-barn/ )”
    Also, as someone also pointed out, those are ‘turkeys’ above the doors. (Not Emu or Ostrich).
    The museum is truly a unique attraction and, if you visit their website, you can get a feel for the many buildings and exhibits which are available for viewing.

  • I probably should have ‘corrected’ the original photo submitter in my first comment, and pointed out that it is only called the “Horseshoe Barn”. It was not ever nor intended to be a horse barn.

    I also should have corrected my own comment when I quoted it. I had only thought that members would follow the link provided, where they could read about the barn:

    “The two-story Horseshoe Barn, built on the [Shelburne] Museum grounds in 1949, was modeled after a unique horseshoe-shaped dairy barn in Georgia, Vermont. Its hand-hewn beams are from twelve different Vermont barns, and the stone is from two gristmills. The outside length is 238 ½ feet, with a thirty-two-foot-wide interior space.”

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