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  1. #1
    Silver Member Zephrant's Avatar
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    Jan 2009
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    202
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Tractor
    JD 2210

    Default Blading a road and making divots

    My road needs a ditch on the up-hill side, to prevent run-off from washing over the road. I'd also like to smooth out some bumps and depressions.

    The tools I have at hand are a JD2210, and a 6' blade. So I went out yesterday to see what kind of damage I could do. I don't yet have a box blade.

    When I'm driving along the front wheels will drop in to a depression, and the blade will lift, leaving a mound. Then the back wheels drop in and the blade scoops out a divot. By the time I'm done, I've taken one hole and turned it in to two, plus added a mound! What can I do to reduce that effect?
    JD 2210, 210 loader, RB2072 blade, Cosmo 500 Spreader
    Pirate Ship Treehouse project

  2. #2
    Super Member 3RRL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    6,825
    Location
    Foothills of the Giant Sequoia's, California
    Tractor
    55HP 4WD KAMA 554 and 4 x 4 Jinma 284

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    You could try flipping the blade around 180 degrees and push backwards like a bull dozer.
    Be very careful with that because you could pretzel your drag links (like I did) if they are not very beefy. You should only push loose dirt if that is the case.

    Driving forward over bumps and humps your tires follow those bumps like you found out. Pushing dirt in reverse like that will do this. First find a high spot you want to cut down to fill a low spot. Push dirt off the top of the high spot. Pretty soon, your tires are now on level flat ground since they are now riding on the flat surface you just created. Your blade will then remain steady and not dip up and down so much. Once you have the area pretty much leveled out, you can drag the blade forward again without having to drive over those humps and bumps.

    Like I said, be careful pushing in reverse.
    If the high spots are hard, try to loosen them up first, or take a very small cut at a time. You don't want to bend your drag links! I welded a "T" reinforcement on the bottom of my drag links to make them very strong. That was after I bent them.
    Rob-
    Rob-
    ...The Older I get...the Better I Used to be...
    Member of the Month

  3. #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    It takes several passes to get it right. as you blade the road the holes will fill and your humps will diminish. On the last pass, back blading works well. Even with a road grader you will have small divots if the front tire drops in a hole. as the holes fill things will level out. have patience.

  4. #4
    Silver Member Zephrant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    202
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Tractor
    JD 2210

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    Thanks for the tips- I tried pushing the dirt with the blade flipped when I was down at the switch-back, and it did seam to go smoother, but the blade seamed to lift easer and floated a lot. I doubt my links are very tough though, it is a pretty small tractor. I tied in to some big roots, and even some rocks that yanked me to a dead stop, even when I was going very slow. But if I stayed out of the ditch with it, I'd probably be OK.

    I went back out today to have some more fun in the mud. Yesterday I was trying to use the blade to carve out the ditch as I drove down the road. That mostly just put mud on my gravel for me, and left a pretty rough ditch as the blade bounced over rocks.

    Results from yesterday:


    So I decided that I'd scrape out the ditch a bite at a time by backing up and dropping the blade, then use the loader to scoop up the dirt and cart it away. That made a nice rounded ditch but took a lot of forwards/backwards. Also quite the pain to pickup the mud/dirt and throw it over the edge of the road.



    Then I made some passes with the blade, but ended up cutting though the gravel to the dirt underneath in a few places- hope that doesn't make mud puddles before the road restrictions come off and I can get some gravel up here...
    JD 2210, 210 loader, RB2072 blade, Cosmo 500 Spreader
    Pirate Ship Treehouse project

  5. #5
    Elite Member dex3361's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    3,571
    Location
    N. of Charleston WV
    Tractor
    Kubota L4400-1 HST,FEL, 3x3 remotes, TNT. BX1500 54 mmm

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    I have run into the same thing in the past and I got around it by replacing the top link with a chain. Then when you drop the blade let a little slack in the chain while you pull the gravel and if the front of the tractor dropss down the chain will allow the blade to float instead of making divots in the road. It worked for me until I got the recent tractor with Top and Tilt and the valve for the top link cylinder has a float position.
    Randall



    1Timothy Chapter 2:
    3 For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;
    4 Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
    5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.
    From: The HOLY BIBLE

  6. #6
    Gold Member dangerdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    354

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    Quote Originally Posted by Zephrant View Post
    My road needs a ditch on the up-hill side, to prevent run-off from washing over the road. I'd also like to smooth out some bumps and depressions.

    The tools I have at hand are a JD2210, and a 6' blade. So I went out yesterday to see what kind of damage I could do. I don't yet have a box blade.

    When I'm driving along the front wheels will drop in to a depression, and the blade will lift, leaving a mound. Then the back wheels drop in and the blade scoops out a divot. By the time I'm done, I've taken one hole and turned it in to two, plus added a mound! What can I do to reduce that effect?
    What has worked for me is to make several passes with the cutting directed forward and the blade set at a 30 degree angle. This will allows you to cut in and get your drainage right. Then turn your blade with the cutting edge directed backwards and set the blade to a zero degree angle. This will spread out your loose gravel and fill in the dips. Once you have the drainage right and the the dips are mostly gone, blade about once a month with the cutting edge pointed rearward, this will remove the remaining dips as the the rock and fines get compacted. After every thing is set, blade a couple of times a year with the blade pointed backwards to bring the rock back to the top.

  7. #7
    Elite Member zzvyb6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,145
    Location
    michigan
    Tractor
    jd 1070

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    The key ingredients to smoothing a road are getting material loose, blade width, blade angle, blade float, and patience.

    You need to get loose material to work with. A rototiller works REALLY well for this. Do the best you can with your blade to rake a lot of gravel to the center of the road first. Use a chain for a top link, concrete blocks or iron weights to make it dig, a lot of angle (45 degrees) and set the lower links all the way down to make the blade scalp the road. If you are handy, make some blade "feet" out of wood to then set the blade slightly off the roadway. (The way skid shoes hold a snow plow blade off the road). Then comb the sides of the road to make it have a crown and finally set the blade angle to zero to top off the center portion. Its not a single step deal, but lots of incremental passes to get it right. Then pack it down with a lawn roller or drive on it slowly to compress the stone down.
    There is no "I" in team, but there is a "Me" if you want to jumble it up a bit...

  8. #8
    Platinum Member spruce Deere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    708
    Location
    Northmost Idaho
    Tractor
    John Deere 790 w/ 300 loader

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    O.k Gonzaga, Use your loader bucket to clean and form the ditch. A blade will work but a bucket you have down presure and can carry dirt and junk off and away from the road. The main thing is there a colvert or somewhere for the water to not run back over the road downhill from this spot. To smooth a road up with holes and divits I Blade driveways same as a county grader does county roads. A couple passes down both sides angling the spoils to the center of the road. Then I straddle the pile of loosened gravel in the middle of the road and spread the gravel evenly. The first few times, pulling the blade pointed forward to cut down the pile evenly. Last few trips turn the blade 180 deg. and pull the blade pointed backwards, this avoids making divits and acts in more of a smoothing action, insted of the blade cutting in the fresh, loose gravel. I dont use skid shoes on my blade for this. Only time I really use'em is plowing snow. Theres my two cents....
    790 JD W/ 300 loader
    Lots of implements for loader and 3pt
    Can't do it burn'n diesel, is not worth do'n

  9. #9
    Elite Member teg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    4,691
    Location
    Raleigh, NC Hillsville, VA
    Tractor
    L2800 - HST

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    "...What can I do to reduce that effect?..."

    What works for me... Go slow, and make many tiny adjustments up and down as you go. Easier to do it slowly a couple of times to get it near level. What I see is that your road looks pretty flat (which should be easy to get to a final grade). I'm sure that's not the "trouble" spot.

    If there are spots that dip more (needs to be cut out a lot), work just one hill at a time. Angled the blade to cut the hill forward to scape off the top, you'll created a pile of dirt that you can smooth out in front and/or push a little dirt back over the hill to smooth out the front side. Lots of forward and backing up... HST helps a great deal with this. I may make 3 or four adjustments in a 3-4 foot run... yes, again, very slowly. Your blade is pretty sharp or is it worn out and doesn't slice very well???

    As for the ditch, angled and use the point to scrape it out. Wish I had a photo of my friends' Tuffline blade which you can offset out to the side and angle it like a son of a gun... you drive down the flat road and the blade cuts a nice ditch.


    This is one of two roads I made through the woods... To be honest, it doesn't show what you are asking...
    http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/p...-building.html

    After reading what I wrote, I don't see why you could not drive the whole road and cut the tops down it one direction, then turn around and work it in the other direction, making adjustments at each hill.

  10. #10
    Gold Member dangerdoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    354

    Default Re: Blading a road and making divots

    Quote Originally Posted by zzvyb6 View Post
    The key ingredients to smoothing a road are getting material loose, blade width, blade angle, blade float, and patience.

    You need to get loose material to work with. A rototiller works REALLY well for this. Do the best you can with your blade to rake a lot of gravel to the center of the road first. Use a chain for a top link, concrete blocks or iron weights to make it dig, a lot of angle (45 degrees) and set the lower links all the way down to make the blade scalp the road. If you are handy, make some blade "feet" out of wood to then set the blade slightly off the roadway. (The way skid shoes hold a snow plow blade off the road). Then comb the sides of the road to make it have a crown and finally set the blade angle to zero to top off the center portion. Its not a single step deal, but lots of incremental passes to get it right. Then pack it down with a lawn roller or drive on it slowly to compress the stone down.
    A tractor with down pressure on the 3 pt makes a huge difference. I couldn't understand why my new kubota couldn't cut like my old Farmall for the longest time.

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