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  1. #1
    toy
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    Default Ondura roofing

    Has anyone on the forum used or know of anyone that has used ondura roofing? What is your opinion of it, and experiences with it? If you have had a problem with it could you elaborate on what the problem was? If it has been a good choice would you tell about that also?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    A good friend of mine built a garage around 1994 with Ondura roofing and is actually replacing it this weekend. The Ondura is crumbling around the screws/nails used to secure it to the building.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    Wow BuckeyeFarmer1994, I have looked at that stuff came real close to buying it and thought the same thing that you mentioned might happen.

  4. #4
    Veteran Member Kernopelli's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    I have not used it personally but considered it strongly for roof replacements on some commercial property. This was 10-12 yrs or so ago so the product may be totally different now but at the time my personal concerns were about its ability to withstand impacts (limbs, heavy hail, edges breaking etc) but was eventually talked out of it by some local contractors I know...if I remember correctly, they had seen problems with areas where it had been cut or screwed.

    On Edit. I began to feel somewhat conflicted because I had commented on something that you asked for personal experiences with and I offered why I chose not to use it. I began Googling "Ondura reviews" and there are a lot of forums online that offer opinions from actual users. After reading more than a few forums, there are customers saying it's great. However like most things in life, if a product moves a person to offer an opinion it is usually because of a problem, not because they were pleased. Of those offering opinions it looks like the majority of those users biggest problem is w/ peeling paint in the 5-10yr period after install. Deterioration around nail holes, stacks/vents and other cuts (what I was told by my friends) seems to be the next biggest issue. Almost everyone with a problem expressed great dissatisfaction with Ondura warranty when they made claims. It appears from those willing to express their experiences of addressing the "lifetime warranty" is that Ondura fights tooth and nail in actually making good on repair or replacement. The best solution that I read was that Ondura offered a customer a 25% discount on their Ondura brand paint w/ no labor reimbursement to repair a peeling problem for the customer. It was unclear if anyone else I read about actually ever received any support from Ondura with their claim, just continual repeating that they are difficult to deal with.
    That all said, you really need to read the forums for yourself, if you havent already.
    Last edited by Kernopelli; 11-13-2009 at 06:10 PM.
    Darryl

  5. #5
    toy
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    Thanks for all the replies, I have wondered how well it has held up for people since it has been around for a while. It would seem to me that if you walked on it that it would give under your weight and would cause a problem with the nails that fasten it down, although I don't know what kind of nails that hold it down. I was thinking that if there was some kind of backing that would match the contours of it that that would help solve that problem. I have seen it in the stores and seems like a lot of their display set ups have cracked edges but I was giving it the benefit of doubt there since it probably had been probably hit with the fork lift as they moved other material around. I was looking for a cheap replacement for a tin roof on a building that is about 4 years old. The tin was a big disappointment for a roof, my Dad always warned me to never use tin on a roof too bad I had to learn the hard way. Giving fairness to tin though the tin that was used on the building was probably the cheapest that you could get. Once again thanks to all that responded, maybe someone might have some kind of idea. If it wasn't that it could be seen from the road I would just sheet it and put roll roofing on it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    Quote Originally Posted by toy View Post
    Thanks for all the replies, I have wondered how well it has held up for people since it has been around for a while. It would seem to me that if you walked on it that it would give under your weight and would cause a problem with the nails that fasten it down, although I don't know what kind of nails that hold it down. I was thinking that if there was some kind of backing that would match the contours of it that that would help solve that problem. I have seen it in the stores and seems like a lot of their display set ups have cracked edges but I was giving it the benefit of doubt there since it probably had been probably hit with the fork lift as they moved other material around. I was looking for a cheap replacement for a tin roof on a building that is about 4 years old. The tin was a big disappointment for a roof, my Dad always warned me to never use tin on a roof too bad I had to learn the hard way. Giving fairness to tin though the tin that was used on the building was probably the cheapest that you could get. Once again thanks to all that responded, maybe someone might have some kind of idea. If it wasn't that it could be seen from the road I would just sheet it and put roll roofing on it.
    We installed Ondura roofing on a township building back in '84. I think they called it Onduline or some such name back then. Thankfully we only contracted the labor. We tried to talk the township into steel roofing but they wouldn't listen.
    The Ondura roofing is easy to work with. It holds up to walking on it if its not too hot outside, otherwise it collapses under your weight. I'm talking about when its new. I have no idea how it holds up when its aged. The township did replace the roof after 10-12 years. I'm not sure what failed on the Ondura roof, but I'm not surprised it failed.
    Stay away from roll roofing. You'll just end up with another set of problems. Go with a good quality steel roof, or sheet it and install rubber if it doesn't have much pitch, or architectural shingles if you have a 4/12 or more pitch.
    Taking the cheap way out is rarely the most economical in the long run. Quality materials and quality workmanship will be the cheapest option in the long run.
    Pops

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    I put Ondura on a run-in shed I built about 10 years ago. It's about due for replacement. The color was peeling after 5 years. I wouldn't buy it again. I can get good steel ridge panels for about the same price and if I nail it right to the purlins I don't think there is a better or less expensive roof.

    2006 Kama 554, 92 Belarus 250AS, Bombardier Outlander Max 400.

  8. #8
    Platinum Member JohninCT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    We used the Ondura roofing on our barn going on 5 years ago. So far it has been good for our use. We really like the skylite panels which let lots of natural light into the barn during the day. It was fast and easy to put on. One thing I didn't really like about it was that it uses nails to hold it on. I would have prefered screws with washers. If the nail didn't go straight in it created an elongated hole that needed to be sealed up. One thing that I thought was good about it is that the nails go through the peaks of the corrugations, so water runs down and away from the fasteners. On corrugated systems where the fasteners are in the valleys the water is always running over them making the fastener seals very critical. Like others have said, I wouldn't walk on it. Also, I wouldn't want to have a branch come down on it cause it could poke through. For something like a barn or a shed, I might use it again. I probably wouldn't use it on anything more important.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ondura roofing-sany0413.jpg  
    "I don't do landscaping... I do battle with vegetation"

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    Quote Originally Posted by toy View Post
    Has anyone on the forum used or know of anyone that has used ondura roofing? What is your opinion of it, and experiences with it? If you have had a problem with it could you elaborate on what the problem was? If it has been a good choice would you tell about that also?
    I put Ondura on our home about 18 years ago myself. I have a T style roof which makes for 2 valleys. Valleys have been a real problem, leak caused damage, had to replace some roof sheating. Replaced ridge cap, the sun just ate it. The house faces South, the South side Ondura has harden and become brittle in addition to deterating. The Ondura instructions indicate that it should be painted and I belive that would prolong the roofing, I am just a little late getting that done. There doesn't seem to be a good method to keep rain water from getting under the Ondura in a Valley and while Water Dam does stop any leaks, water that pools always seems to find a place to get through. Water Dam closes up around the nails, however, sooner or later the water will find a weak nail hole and in comes water.

    Metal roof will require painting at some point but will not be brittle or curled up requiring replacement like Ondura. I will not use Ondura again and will probably have this roof replaced with metal before much longer. I would suggest not using Ondura even though I think I have lasted long enough to be able to say that I have gotten my money's worth out of it compared to asphalt shingles, but then that was not the intent from the beginning.

    My parents home is over 125 years old with a metal latch type roof. It's been painted over the years, I would be afraid to guess the thickness of the paint but the roof still does it's job. It was painted by hand for years, then later with people that came around the country wanting to paint barns, houses, etc. They used very long extensions on paint sprayers while standing on the ground. Job would be done in short order and good for several more years.

    Since landfills don't want roofing, I don't intend to fight it any longer, I will use metal.

  10. #10
    toy
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    Default Re: Ondura roofing

    Quote Originally Posted by BrokenAxle46 View Post
    I put Ondura on our home about 18 years ago myself. I have a T style roof which makes for 2 valleys. Valleys have been a real problem, leak caused damage, had to replace some roof sheating. Replaced ridge cap, the sun just ate it. The house faces South, the South side Ondura has harden and become brittle in addition to deterating. The Ondura instructions indicate that it should be painted and I belive that would prolong the roofing, I am just a little late getting that done. There doesn't seem to be a good method to keep rain water from getting under the Ondura in a Valley and while Water Dam does stop any leaks, water that pools always seems to find a place to get through. Water Dam closes up around the nails, however, sooner or later the water will find a weak nail hole and in comes water.

    Metal roof will require painting at some point but will not be brittle or curled up requiring replacement like Ondura. I will not use Ondura again and will probably have this roof replaced with metal before much longer. I would suggest not using Ondura even though I think I have lasted long enough to be able to say that I have gotten my money's worth out of it compared to asphalt shingles, but then that was not the intent from the beginning.

    My parents home is over 125 years old with a metal latch type roof. It's been painted over the years, I would be afraid to guess the thickness of the paint but the roof still does it's job. It was painted by hand for years, then later with people that came around the country wanting to paint barns, houses, etc. They used very long extensions on paint sprayers while standing on the ground. Job would be done in short order and good for several more years.

    Since landfills don't want roofing, I don't intend to fight it any longer, I will use metal.
    I reworked the building that I was having trouble with and it seems to have solved the problem with condensation. I took off the old tin, put osb board on it and then felt and then put new tin on top of that with the ridges of the tin running up and down instead of length wise the building. With the tin turned this way it sheds water faster, I also added extra insulation which seems to help a lot. Before when I would go out there and would shut the door it was like being in a rain storm.

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