Post Driver Advice needed for my RK-55

   / Post Driver Advice needed for my RK-55 #1  

jayincmh

Bronze Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
82
Location
Heath, OH
Tractor
RK-55
Anyone here using a post driver with their tractor? I recently acquired a horse farm and would like to install more pasture. Made the decision to purchase a post driver for my tractor, (2019 RK-55), and am looking for advice on selecting the right driver.

Currently focused on the Shaver HD-10 post driver, 3-pt hitch attached. Would need the category one conversion, but that's not a big deal. My concern is the hydraulics. The GPM on the RK55 hydraulic system is slightly lower than the requirements for the Shaver HD-10. Pressure is fine. I'm thinking this would simply mean a slower cycle time to raise the hammer. Can anyone confirm this? Would you recommend a different post driver that you're using, hopefully on your RK-55? I believe the Shaver HD-8 just isn't enough of a driver for my needs.

Feedback appreciated from anyone who is currently using or has used a post driver with their tractor. Especially an RK-55.

Thanks in advance.
 
   / Post Driver Advice needed for my RK-55 #2  

Torvy

Elite Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2021
Messages
2,920
Location
North East Texas
Tractor
Early stages of purchasing a T494H
What type of posts? I don't have an RK55, but am purchasing a T494, which is effectively the same tractor without Turbo. I have to fence about 15 acres (a mix of T-posts and 4" round wood posts. I have been advised by others to simply use the FEL and bucket to push the posts into the ground. I am probably going with a post hole digger as I will also need to plant trees off and on for years. Very interested in hearing what advice comes forth.
 
   / Post Driver Advice needed for my RK-55 #3  

Gator6x4

Elite Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2003
Messages
2,553
Location
NC
Tractor
Kubota Grand L3830
Found this one. Three versions. It might work for you.

 
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   / Post Driver Advice needed for my RK-55 #4  

zzvyb6

Elite Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2006
Messages
4,553
Location
michigan
Tractor
jd 1070
Keep in mind that the hydraulics doesn't pound the post. The hydraulics raises the hammer while preloading the mechanical springs that actually discharge the pounding force. So, the pressure could be a problem to raise the hammer to it's farthest height, but flow rate is just the cycle time between strokes. My soil has a lot of rock content, not big ones, just football sized and this caused some problems for the kind of posts I chose (landscape timbers). It helps to sharpen the ends as a way to break thru hard soil. But I broke a lot of posts in the process.
Lately, I drive steel posts alongside broken off wood ones using my loader forks. Then lash them with aluminum wire tightened using a battery powered drill. For new posts, I use an auger attached to an ordinary hydraulic motor hinged of the bucket or fork frame. I get downforce and reverse as necessary. I can line up the next hole a soon as the first one is done. Tossing poles in the holes and back-filling is the only other task and with an auger close to the post size, I can adjust the angles and depth very well. Once the pounder gets going, the angle it started out with is not correctable. Loading the driver onto the tractor was also a problem for me. Awkward height. Mine was 3pt. I'd want a loader mounted something to see what I was lining up and not needing an owl neck or dismounting the tractor to operate it. If I chain my times together, I can drill a hole in a minute (in and out), then use my golf cart to carry posts, with an attached wagon load of road gravel to backfil and tamp. The wire I use for horse fencing is easy to roll along the ground. Anchor 1 end with a fence stretcher on the other end and I'm pretty much done other than stapling.
 
 
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