2021 Chevy Silverado 2500HD gas vs. diesel?

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nikerret

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Still applies as soon as torque converter is locked and applies in larger manual transmission trucks.
Frankly, there’s so much torque management in the stock setup it really doesn’t matter. Unless you get in the computer and open the tap, you’re getting a fraction of what should be available.
 

Hay Dude

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Frankly, there’s so much torque management in the stock setup it really doesn’t matter. Unless you get in the computer and open the tap, you’re getting a fraction of what should be available.
I bet if you rode with me and saw the difference, your eyes would be opened.
Look, I get it, you want to justify the intelligence of your purchase. Its human nature to do that. Just don’t start throwing rocks at the alternatives for that sole reason.
There’s other very smart reasons to roll differently than you do. I would buy a gas truck for primarily unloaded and a occasional towing, too. Bet you didn’t see that coming, did ya?
Just bought a Jeep Rubicon with gas engine. Love it!
 

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We are agreeing on a few things. My F-350 gas gets around 5-6 MPG fully loaded, in hills and with wind (where I live there are always hills and wind). Unloaded, my heavy truck gets between 10-15, generally.

We aren’t comparing heavier loads. The OP asked about towing 10-15k, not getting the most truck so he can max it out. As I said, if you’re towing more than 20k, you should consider a diesel. I wouldn’t recommend anyone buy a gas pickup to pull 30k.

I don’t understand your trips example. The trips I have to take is more determined by the item and available trailer than what truck you use. If you’re getting paid by the ton, you should buy the heaviest duty diesel you can find. Again, not what the OP was asking about.

If his traiier and load will never be more than 15k, it doesn’t matter if he can tow 22k.

When I was truck shopping, I accounted for everything I could find. Actually, few little of it came from spec sheets. I’ve been fortunate to be able to get behind the wheel of a wide variety of vehicles and have spent a lot of time in the County Maintenance shop, seeing what holds up and what hasn’t.

OP is towing 10-15k, but how far and how often? If I’m buying a 2500 and I’m towing 10-15k often, then I’d still go diesel. Add to that, towing that weight a long distance, Id want diesel even MORE. Again, gas towing 15k often will live at the gas pump.....Probably 6MPG.....(you admitted it), whereas diesel will probably double that. Also it’s a calmer, more controlled tow and the diesel will live longer. Diesel is a more professional towing drivetrain.
Ask professional haulers and truckers what works better, diesel or gas? Whether or not the OP is or isn’t a professional trucker doesn’t change the fact that a Diesel engine pulls more, lasts longer, makes more torque, and when towing gets double fuel mileage.
Now if it’s 10k and seldom towing, even a little 15k towing thrown in, then probably gas.
 
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nikerret

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Look, I get it, you want to justify the intelligence of your purchase. Its human nature to do that.

My purchase was right, for what I need a truck for, right now. No need to justify it to strangers.

There’s other very smart reasons to roll differently than you do. I would buy a gas truck for primarily unloaded and a occasional towing, too. Bet you didn’t see that coming, did ya?
So, you now 180* on what would be best for the OP? After all, he is daily driving it and only occasionally towing.

That’s mind boggling.
 

Hay Dude

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Frankly, there’s so much torque management in the stock setup it really doesn’t matter. Unless you get in the computer and open the tap, you’re getting a fraction of what should be available.
But the diesel engine makes more torque, period. And it makes it at lower RPM, period.
I asked you before and I will ask you again, would you rather have less torque and less torque down low?
would that make towing better?
 

Hay Dude

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My purchase was right, for what I need a truck for, right now. No need to justify it to strangers.


So, you now 180* on what would be best for the OP? After all, he is daily driving it and only occasionally towing.

That’s mind boggling.
No, it’s not. The Jeep won’t tow anything. My choice is gas. And they offer a 3L diesel.
 

nikerret

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But the diesel engine makes more torque, period. And it makes it at lower RPM, period.
I asked you before and I will ask you again, would you rather have less torque and less torque down low?
would that make towing better?
Yes, pound for pound the diesel makes more torque And at a lower RPM-never said it didn’t.

If the ONLY metric was torque, of course I want more. However, there are a litany of other factors that must be considered. As long as the amount of torque meets the need of my application, that box is checked. My truck is a tool. I don’t want fancy or a bunch of extras. I want it to do the job at the lowest overall cost possible.

Im not going to quote your other post, but the distance if his “daily drive” and specifics of what he’s towing how far, and how often, all play a big part in what would fill his needs the best. Which, if you go back to my first post, in this thread, is what I addressed.

Right now, the OP getting along with a GM 6.0L gas engine truck. The new 6.6L gas would be a huge step up, from his current rig. If a diesel 6.6L would be better, for him, with the information given, is unlikely, in my opinion.

I have never plowed with a truck (I have a tiny tractor that does that job), but from what I’ve read, the diesel isn’t the way to go, in plowing applications. I believe that is mostly due to the weight, on the front end and the fact the diesel is quite a bit heavier than the gas engine.

There’s a giant difference between the morning commute being 2 miles and 30 miles. Same with towing 15k once a year versus daily.
 
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nikerret

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I asked you before and I will ask you again, would you rather have less torque and less torque down low?
would that make towing better?

It’s no different than looking at tractors. Of course, I wish my tractor could lift 5 tons to 20 feet high, but it’s more important that it fits in my garage, fits on my trailer, fits through customers’ gates, doesn’t tear up their lawn, etc.
 

Hay Dude

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Yes, pound for pound the diesel makes more torque And at a lower RPM-never said it didn’t.

If the ONLY metric was torque, of course I want more. However, there are a litany of other factors that must be considered. As long as the amount of torque meets the need of my application, that box is checked. My truck is a tool. I don’t want fancy or a bunch of extras. I want it to do the job at the lowest overall cost possible.

Im not going to quote your other post, but the distance if his “daily drive” and specifics of what he’s towing how far, and how often, all play a big part in what would fill his needs the best. Which, if you go back to my first post, in this thread, is what I addressed.

Right now, the OP getting along with a GM 6.0L gas engine truck. The new 6.6L gas would be a huge step up, from his current rig. If a diesel 6.6L would be better, for him, with the information given, is unlikely, in my opinion.

I have never plowed with a truck (I have a tiny tractor that dies that job), but from what I’ve read, the diesel isn’t the way to go, in plowing applications. I believe that is mostly due to the weight, on the front end and the fact the diesel is quite a bit heavier than the gas engine.

There’s a giant difference between the morning commute being 2 miles and 30 miles. Same with towing 15k once a year versus daily.

Snowplowing? Plowed with a diesel since 1992. There’s not that much difference in weight, maybe a few hundred pounds. If you put weight in the bed to balance it, as I’m sure you know, weight = traction. I have no doubt that while backing up a hilly driveway the Diesel engines weight on the front axle helps with traction. I use my snowplowing truck to tow as well, so I go diesel there, too.

Torque isn’t my only metric, either. I also use other metrics, like longevity, fuel economy loaded, and resale value. By the time I am done with a diesel truck, I have done much better than gas. I have paid back my extra purchase price and had a more professional driving experience when towing.
 
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