4540 Temp Gauge ?

   #1  

123maxbars

Silver Member
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
137
Tractor
Kubota B3200
I am getting ready to pull the trigger on a new 4540. I have read in the past few years that the Temp Gauge had a lot of issues and failed on lots of tractors (this model) around 2016 and 2015. Does anyone know if Mahindra got this issue fixed? I plan on having the dealer check mine in the shop if I buy one. Also I saw where some people had problems with fuel lines leaking just under 100 hours, Any help would be appreciated. I really like this tractor and the features and hope to close on the deal next week.
 
   #2  

swampy6

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2017
Messages
260
Location
Foothills of The Adirondacks, New York State
Tractor
Mahindra 4540 4WD
We have a 4540 that we bought new in 2016, it wasn't that the temp gauge was bad, they had to put in a inline restrictor coming out of the radiator which brought the temp up.

Before the inline restrictor it was like the temp gauge was broke but it just wasn't getting warm enough for a reading. We haven't had a problem with ours since we bought it, we have just over 630 hours on it.

We use ours for plowing in the winter and moving around some wood or brush, we don't have any chains but the back tires are loaded.

We've never had any fuel line leaks on ours, we finally had a new garage built this summer so I check for any leaks everyday and we've had nothing except after we got it back from its 500 hour checkup ( we had all fluids and the filters changed) after getting it back there were no leaks but one morning I saw a small spot on the cement, I found the plug that had loosened up but after getting on it with a crescent wrench everything is fine.

We did get the backhoe with it (4550B I think) we have lots of sand so when we dig out stumps it goes pretty good if you start out wide and then work your way in. We also bought a plow with a third funtion valve kit so we don't have to get off the tractor to angle the blade. We also have a set of pallet forks from Mahindra that get used a lot.




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   #3  

Jabonee

Platinum Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2015
Messages
908
Location
Pennsylvania
Tractor
Mahindra
I am getting ready to pull the trigger on a new 4540. I have read in the past few years that the Temp Gauge had a lot of issues and failed on lots of tractors (this model) around 2016 and 2015. Does anyone know if Mahindra got this issue fixed? I plan on having the dealer check mine in the shop if I buy one. Also I saw where some people had problems with fuel lines leaking just under 100 hours, Any help would be appreciated. I really like this tractor and the features and hope to close on the deal next week.
Look close at the fuel lines and make sure that they are not braided. The braided covered lines were the ones having issues. Should not be a problem if you are getting a new unit. :thumbsup:
 
   #4  

rockarosa

Bronze Member
Joined
May 2, 2014
Messages
85
Location
Warren Ridge, Ohio
Tractor
Mahindra 4550
I have a 4550 with 120 hours on it. So far no problems. The temp doesn't move unless I'm running the brush hog. Dealer tells me not to worry about it. When I brush hog it comes up into the green. Tractor so far has been a beast.
 
   #5  

swampy6

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2017
Messages
260
Location
Foothills of The Adirondacks, New York State
Tractor
Mahindra 4540 4WD
I was told that a diesel engine running cold will do damage, that is why we had them put in the inline restrictor in.

This is our first ever tractor and our dealer said the same about our 4540 but when I ask the question to the mechanic, he said yes you should have a reading on the temp gauge. We use our tractor for plowing in the winter, digging stumps out in the summer & fall and moving some logs around.

Don't take my word on it but I would ask some guys on here their opinion, this is an article I just brought up from a search.

5. You’re not Letting Your Engine Warm Up
Don’t be that guy who starts his cold engine and immediately revs it up. The only thing you’re showing off is that you don’t know your turbo and engine bearings won’t get lubricated properly with cold, thick oil. Let your engine warm up like you warm up in the morning. Let the glow plugs and intake heater do their job. Fire the engine and give it some time for the combustion heat to warm the engine evenly.
This practice is very important on extremely cold mornings. Hot and cold engine parts expand at different rates, so gaps can form, which could cause leaks or gasket failures. Wait until your engine oil and coolant temperature gauges show you are in the right operating range. You do have these readings…don’t you? Also, if it’s really cold, don’t turn the steering wheel too much right away or you could risk blowing a hydraulic hose. The other thing that’ll keep your engine running longer is preheated coolant. The more cold-starts your diesel is subjected to, the shorter its lifespan will be. Inconsistent metal expansion and poor-flowing (thick) lubricants don’t provide protection from moving parts.
Another thing to worry about is fuel washing the cylinder walls before compression ignition can occur. Here is a message we got from a reader from the North Pole: “I have both batteries heated, the block heated, and two heating pads on the oil pan. The transmission is not heated, because it’s a stick. The intercooler is totally blocked as well. I might just put a pad on the transfer case and front differential, but it warms after about a mile of driving in four-wheel drive.” Diesel-fueled auxiliary heaters are also an option. It’s also just as important to let your diesel cool off before you shut it down. A turbo timer will do this automatically for you, because if it gets shut off too soon, oil will overheat, break down, and destroy turbo bearings.

1 Ways You’re Killing Your Diesel - Diesel Power Magazine
 
 
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