A kid gets terminated at work...

2LaneCruzer

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You'll work the hours to put food on your table and support your family.

Right now I'm teleworking and have a 4 day work week so I'm not complaining. I also know what everyone else is making. And yes, some people are making more money than they are worth but not my problem.
An old coal miner once told me that he quit because the mine was too dangerous...but "when the kids start gnawing the paint of the table legs, you know it's time to go back to work". In his case, he decided to go to work in a different mine, although it was in a different state. He said the day after he went back to work, the old mine blew up and killed a lot of miners. In those days, the widow got $100.
 

JethroB

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My first experience with pay & supervising was late in high school. My dad had a couple of acres of field tomatoes he was done with as it had about played out. So I hired a couple of 15 year olds agreeing on $2/hour to pick while I sat in the shade grading and packing. At noon one had picked maybe 10 30# boxes and the other only 5 boxes. Hmmm, not good for my then underage beer fund. So after lunch I added an additional $1/box to the pay. So in the afternoon the first fellow picked 20 boxes and the second only 5 once again. I still see and tease them both about it 40+ years later.
 
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BackRoad

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Mr. MossRoad nailed it.

It matters not what anyone else is being paid.

It's a simple formula which they don't teach in school...

It only matters that YOU provide more value to the business than what you are being paid.

It creates a good reputation and you'll always have an income or a job offer, whether working for yourself or someone else.

Step 2 is to constantly improve your skills and freely take on additional responsibility simply for the benefit of the experience.

The result is proven capability to provide increasing value over time, which expands opportunities and justifies increased income.

Now, how you save and invest that income is a whole different discussion!
 

ultrarunner

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My brother still says the best job he ever had was summer life guard for the park district… they had a lot of leeway for teens and it was understood have a great summer and make sure no one is injured… credited with saving a couple of people… heart attack, bee sting shock and one near drowning along with the cuts and bruises… he did that high school and college…

As a kid working for a car dealership was great since I am into cars… as soon as I got my license I could take any of the used cars home overnight and sold about 20 that first year… not bad for a gopher…

Weekend manager for auto parts not bad either for a teen.

Working in a Union Tool and Machine shop learned a lot but would never call it fun… always production schedules and deadlines… I was 21 so not a kid even though everyone called me the kid…

Each job provided very different work settings and very different opportunities.
 
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MossRoad

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At my current job, the hourly starting wage was posted in the job description. So was the incentive to complete training classes in a set time period to gain a posted increase in pay. After the 1st year, all raises are confidential, but based on some weird formula that, for example, if there are 5 of you in a group, your supervisor has to rank you 1-5. 1 gets the largest raise while 5 gets the least amount, and the amounts are in percentages. So the 5 guys get together and start yapping about what percentage increase they each got. It doesn't take long for all of them to know who got what percentage to figure out who got ranked higher. Then it starts causing issues with "I do more work than that guy."

When you have a person that's been there 30 years and they get a 1% increase in pay, and you have a person that's been there 2 years, and they get a 1.2% increase in pay, chances are pretty good that the 30 year guy still got a much larger $/hour increase than the 2 year guy, yet, for some reason, the 30 year guy complains that the 2 year guy got a higher percentage, when, in fact, the 30 year guy got more money.

I am not used to anyone thinking they know what I'm getting paid and when they come up to me and tell me they know what I'm getting paid and its X (and they're wrong), I just tell them that's between the company and me and none of their business.

At my last job, everyone that was hourly got paid the same after 2 years if you were doing the same job description. Didn't matter if you were there 2 years or 20. You were doing the same job, so you got paid the same.

Salaried positions were different, and those were confidential. I never minded not knowing what my salaried coworkers were making. It wasn't my business.
 

MoKelly

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As a kid, best job I had was working as an administrative aid in a hospital blood bank. Paperwork galore and 5 steps to ensure the correct blood goes to the correct patient.

Physically delivering the blood units to the OR and checking numbers.

Billing.

Pretty busy most of the time.

MoKelly
 

MossRoad

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My brother still says the best job he ever had was summer life guard for the park district… they had a lot of leeway for teens and it was understood have a great summer and make sure no one is injured… credited with saving a couple of people… heart attack, bee sting shock and one near drowning along with the cuts and bruises… he did that high school and college…

As a kid working for a car dealership was great since I am into cars… as soon as I got my license I could take any of the used cars home overnight and sold about 20 that first year… not bad for a gopher…

Weekend manager for auto parts not bad either for a teen.

Working in a Union Tool and Machine shop learned a lot but would never call it fun… always production schedules and deadlines… I was 21 so not a kid even though everyone called me the kid…

Each job provided very different work settings and very different opportunities.
I'll agree with your brother. I was a lifeguard for the city starting at age 15. Three month contract for $829.00 🤣 It went up every year. I stayed with it through high school and early college. Then I transferred to the newly opened east race man-made whitewater course for the same city and stayed with that into my first 2 years of marriage. That paid double minimum wage hourly. Great jobs! Lots of fun and sun, but lots of training and practice. You really had to concentrate when on duty and man, when there was an incident, your adrenaline went BOOM! It was also a team effort, so you had to count on your coworkers, and likewise, your coworkers had to feel safe relying on you. Especially in the whitewater. Someone could die quickly. It made for lasting bonds that endure 40+ years later.(y)
 

ultrarunner

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My government employed friends get really annoyed to see their name and pay published in the newspaper… it’s been a few years so maybe it has changed but online public safety pay info is readily available.

Same when they publish name and address for every concealed carry permit holder except politicians, public safety and court personnel..
 

MoKelly

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My government employed friends get really annoyed to see their name and pay published in the newspaper… it’s been a few years so maybe it has changed but online public safety pay info is readily available.

Same when they publish name and address for every concealed carry permit holder except politicians, public safety and court personnel..

I guess it’s a good news/bad news scenario when all your compensation data must be published every year in the Proxy Statement.

MoKelly
 

ultrarunner

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Cat D3, Deere 110 TLB, Kubota BX23 and L3800 and RTV900 with restored 1948 Deere M, 1949 Farmall Cub, 1953 Ford Jubliee and 1957 Ford 740 Row Crop, Craftsman Mower, Deere 350C Dozer 50 assorted vehicles from 1905 to 2006
Is can lead to interesting discussions when a friend retires at 52 with 180k city pension and lifetime medical and goes to work for another agency starting at 139k base…
 
 
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