Chain / binders question

   / Chain / binders question #1  

Tomtint

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
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Location
Boston
Tractor
L3700SU
Question is this. I tow a Cat 246 with tracks on a regular basis during snow season. The machine weighs aprox 9000 pounds with out the trailer. I have 2 chains with hooks for the rear and usually one chain with a binder across and through the front. I know the DOT wants one on each corner, but can someone explain to me why attaching equal length chains at the rear, pulling forward to get them tight then wrenching down the front of the machine is not as good as binders in the back ? It always seems that binders do not stay as tight as latching and using the machine to tighten a length of chain.
 
   / Chain / binders question #2  
Because if something happens to that one front chain, your SOL. Get some ratchet binders and if tightened correctly should never loosen on a piece of equipment.
 
   / Chain / binders question #3  
...can someone explain to me why attaching equal length chains at the rear, pulling forward to get them tight then wrenching down the front of the machine is not as good as binders in the back

My understanding is that they want to see a way to tighten the chain at each corner if it becomes loose in transit. The equipment, in many cases, may not be able to move itself to tighten the chain. They are just applying the rule to all cases, regardless of equipment condition.

Bruce
 
   / Chain / binders question
  • Thread Starter
#4  
Because if something happens to that one front chain, your SOL. Get some ratchet binders and if tightened correctly should never loosen on a piece of equipment.

Understood. So what would the problem be with 2 chains in the rear, using the Skid itself to tension them, And then 2 chains with binders in the front ?
 
   / Chain / binders question #5  
Understood. So what would the problem be with 2 chains in the rear, using the Skid itself to tension them, And then 2 chains with binders in the front ?

I don't think you could ever get the tension on them that a chain binder could. The idea is really about reducing the movement/ shock loading on the chains. Also, depending on the angle of the chains, your capacity changes greatly as does the effectiveness.
 
   / Chain / binders question #6  
Now you know better than to apply common sense to anything govt. regulated!:laughing:
 
   / Chain / binders question #7  
Understood. So what would the problem be with 2 chains in the rear, using the Skid itself to tension them, And then 2 chains with binders in the front ?
As I understand it, that is ok as long as the driver has the key to the machine and is capable of driving it in case the chains need to be re-tightened in-transit.
Edit: from the FMCSA site:
http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/regulations/title49/section/393.112 said:
§ 393.112: Must a tiedown be adjustable?
Each tiedown, or its associated connectors, or its attachment mechanisms must be designed, constructed, and maintained so the driver of an in-transit commercial motor vehicle can tighten them. However, this requirement does not apply to the use of steel strapping.

Aaron Z
 
   / Chain / binders question
  • Thread Starter
#8  
I don't think you could ever get the tension on them that a chain binder could. The idea is really about reducing the movement/ shock loading on the chains. Also, depending on the angle of the chains, your capacity changes greatly as does the effectiveness.


I have to disagree with that, I know for certain I can get the chains tighter by pulling them with the skid, and the chain angle would be the same with or without a binder,
 
   / Chain / binders question #9  
I don't think the law states that you have to have binders on all corners but I do think for a machine on tracks you are required to have four tie downs. As long as they are tight I don't think they care how you tightened them but I would have four Seperate chains.

On my tracked skid steer I use the factory anchor points on the back for a short chain and ratchet binder on each side. For the front I use a ratchet binder on each side with no chain. I hook the binder directly to the skid steer frame. I secure the machine with four ratchet binders and about 6' total of chain.
 
   / Chain / binders question #10  
I have to disagree with that, I know for certain I can get the chains tighter by pulling them with the skid, and the chain angle would be the same with or without a binder,

Then your better than I because I don't believe that you can tighten a chain better with the MachiNE than with a binder. If we really want to split hairs we can look at tractive effort or drawbar pull and the coefficient of friction on an icy deck vs the mechanical advantage of a ratchet binder applying tension.
 
 
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