Formal Training?

   #1  

jigs_n_fixtures

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I took a year of “Farm Implements and Equipment” in Junior High. I was living in semi rural Oregon, and the state had a ”Farm Implements” license you could get at 14, if you had formal training in how to operate equipments and implements safely. You could work the family farm without it. But, to go run equipment for anyone else you had to have the license. Thus the Junior and Senior High schools had classes. And, the teacher signed off on your training. I took it so I could start driving tractors and counting flats, on the berry farms, instead of picking fruit.

Out of curiosity how many folks have had any kind of formal training on their equipment and attachments?
 
   #2  

Avenger

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We never had anything like that. Though I think it should be mandatory, especially in city schools where people dont know where their food comes from. Rant aside, I did get my "farmers permit" when I was young, but it wasnt for farming or run equipment for someone else, it was for driving on county roads underage without a drivers license. I was able to drive our farm trucks tractors, etc, before I was 16, on the roads.

I dont think anyone would have stopped me, or cared enough to even ask, if I had formal training and thus a permit to bale the neighbors hay. But times are changing.
 
   #3  

Rdrcr

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Aside from a little instruction from my neighbor (professional operator for 30 years) and hours of seat time, that’s all the training this city boy received.
I’ve done a couple stupid things on my tractors but, I’m getting better with every hour and the neighbor is happy with my work, skill and safety.

Had the opportunity existed in my area, I wouldn’t have turned down tractor operated training and would have been happy to pay for the service.

Mike
 
   #4  

CausticUrbanCoast

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I took a year of “Farm Implements and Equipment” in Junior High. I was living in semi rural Oregon, and the state had a ”Farm Implements” license you could get at 14, if you had formal training in how to operate equipments and implements safely. You could work the family farm without it. But, to go run equipment for anyone else you had to have the license. Thus the Junior and Senior High schools had classes. And, the teacher signed off on your training. I took it so I could start driving tractors and counting flats, on the berry farms, instead of picking fruit.

Out of curiosity how many folks have had any kind of formal training on their equipment and attachments?
You are probably referring to the National FFA program: Future Farmers of America FFA.org | National FFA Organization

They had/have school programes where you do projects and get experience.
 
   #5  

Richard

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Nothing for me, what I know is self taught or watching others. Pretty cool that you could do that!
 
   #6  

grsthegreat

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Nothing in high school besides basic shop classes.But took college level classes at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Ran dozers, backhoes, farm and row crop tractors, learned basic maintenance, engine work, etc. Also took upper level classes which included tearing into motors, lathes and mills, stuff like that. Sure better than accounting 101.
 
   #7  

dodge man

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You mean to actually teach kids a useful life skill? Not likely anymore.

I had some useful classes in high school but nothing like you describe. I’m self taught with a few mistakes in the process.
 
   #9  

rScotty

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Sure, we had all those "real world" classes. FFA, shop, driving, home economics, sewing, and typing. Some of the shop classes - like the wood lathe - were scary - and probably impossible by today's standards.
And of course everyone who didn't have to go work played some sort of sport after school.
It was a nice time, but very busy.

The school my young friends talk about is much different now. They seem more socially skilled. My old generation suffered socially and still is.
But today's kids have to learn how to do a lot of things on their own. Some do, but end up with large knowledge gaps that they aren't even aware of in things like materials, basic leverage, plumbing, electricity - all stuff that school could have taught them as it did for us.
 

/pine

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Our secondary schools had access to an "ag farm" where most all aspects of farming were taught...

Question for the OP...who signed off on the teacher's training ??
 
 
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