Framing questions about this picture

   #11  

CalG

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2011
Messages
3,691
Location
vermont
Tractor
Hurlimann 435, Fordson E27n, Bolens HT-23, Kubota B7200
I'm inexperienced but: Seems unusual having alot of jack and cripples. From what I think, I guess it's to transmit the load from the top plate to the foundation. From things I have read, extra king studs are more important than extra jacks.

I also don't understand the top plate being broken by the beams.

Maybe the contractor is just trying to use more lumber so he makes more money. Lol!

Makes one wonder what is outside? flying buttresses?
 
   #12  

Shutesbury

Silver Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2010
Messages
159
Location
Western Massachusetts
Tractor
Kubota BX-24 - other goodies listed in my profile.
Judging from the wind turbine in the background, I'd guess they get a bit there...
 
   #13  

chim

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2002
Messages
3,330
Location
Lancaster County, PA
Tractor
Kubota L4240, Ford 1210
Based on the beams the 兎xtra top plate isn稚 needed to provide an engineering advantage. It痴 most likely used to makeup a few inches over a standard stud length. Probably cheaper than cutting every stud..............................

I'm doing just that on a shed I'm working on. The overhead door guy asked for 16" clear above the door opening so I could have access at full door opening height.
 
   #14  

oosik

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
15,648
Location
AMBER, WA
Tractor
2009 Kubota M6040
A thought. At the last minuet the size of the glue-lam beams were changed - bigger. The walls were bilt to accommodate the original glue-lam height. Therefore the four layer header to get to the top of the glue-lam. Are we sure there isn't a steel strap over the top of each glue-lam - making the header one continuous beam.

On my Pan Abode cedar home the main beams WERE increased in size at the very last minuet( increased snow load). The manufacturer was unable to make last minuet changes in the construction plans. I had to notch the cedar double walls to allow the beams to fit & extend out beyond the outer wall. There was a page of added instructions noting this beam size change and the need to cut deeper & wider beam pockets. The type on this single page was 120 point and in red ink. Impossible to miss. Plus the Pan Abode rep in Spokane made a special tip out here to ensure I understood this change.
 
   #15  

repowell

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2011
Messages
1,606
Location
East Texas
Tractor
NH Workmaster 75, NH TC40DA
The beam height would account for the 4 top plates. The cripples on the windows may be to narrow the opening for the window size. If this is a church, judging from the beams, the stained glass windows are usually narrower than a standard window. Just a guess on my part.
 
   #16  

Tomtint

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
2,797
Location
Boston
Tractor
L3700SU
Quite possible the beam needs to be set at a certain height to clear things like kitchen cabinets. And building up the top plate allows for that. Here in the people's republic of Mass, every stud you pull out of a window opening, needs to be added to the side of the opening. May be the same thing there.
 
   #17  

civilian

Platinum Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
992
Location
Vanderbilt, MI
Tractor
Gravely Pro 16 walk behind, Kubota BX2230, Kubota B26TLB
Quite possible the beam needs to be set at a certain height to clear things like kitchen cabinets. And building up the top plate allows for that. Here in the people's republic of Mass, every stud you pull out of a window opening, needs to be added to the side of the opening. May be the same thing there.

On my garage with 10ft wide x 10ft high garage doors we were able to use precuts 2x6'x at 116 5/8" on top of 16" concrete walls. Header over doors were 12" glulam beams. On other garage with 16ft wide x 10ft high garage doors, the header is 18" glulam. Had to use 10ft studs and trim to full 10ft. Could have used the precuts with extra top plates instead of trimming every stud. Again on 16" concrete walls. OSB on exterior was 8ft plus a 2ft pieced above with a 2x6 laid flat against OSB seam for a nailer. In the picture the extra plates could be to line up the other double top plates not shown to accomodate a tall door or something. Without seeing other walls, we can only guess as to why this build has extra plates. Our prints on both garages had a bunch of jack studs under these headers. Something to do with uplift and shear wall. (don't understand that portion). The roof over the doors had a 8/12 pitch and then a 4/12 pitch at the eave with a 5ft overhang cantilevered over the wall with no extra posts underneath. Jon
 
   #18  

the old grind

Elite Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2012
Messages
4,546
Location
Mid-Michigan
Tractor
NH T-1520 HST, NH TC33DA HST, Case DX26 HST, .Terramite T5C, . NH L785
Not conventional 'stick built' construction at all. It just looks that way because the wall studs are logically spaced for sheeting and/or insulation.

Look at all the 'stacks' of 2x lumber and recognize "Post and Beam" construction. Lams make better/cheaper beams, and when exposed are easier to dress up. (ceiling, etc.)

The extra cripples, jacks, and top plates represent P&B layout and spacing per code where built. Same under each roof beam's base for same reason.

Havent Sunset Books and Reader's Digest had do-homie books with carpentry sections since the 70's or so?

College texts are easy to find at yard sales, often help describe/explain just this kind of thing to customers with all the illustrations.
 
   #19  

jpm

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2004
Messages
540
Location
Redbud.southern vt
Tractor
4110 mahindra
Maybe the extra plates are to help stop twist and roll of the beams plus transfer load ? If you look close the pocket its loose at the bottom but the plates are tight.
 
   #20  

ray66v

Super Member
Joined
Oct 22, 2006
Messages
5,211
Location
Ohio
Tractor
GC2310,
As stated, engineered for excessive load, and keeping the beams from moving. It's the only thing that makes sense.

Those beams are trying to push the top of the wall out. I don't see what is going to resist it from bending?

My basement has a 2x6 wall with a triple top plate running down the middle in lieu of a support beam.

The quad top plate, and cripple studs on an exterior wall are not helping any with energy insulation.
 
 
Top