Hay Making on a Different Scale

   / Hay Making on a Different Scale #1  

LHF2019

Gold Member
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Aug 25, 2021
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361
Location
NWPA
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IH1586, JD2350, JD2355, JD2950, JD4040, JD4430, TD95D
Seemed it was time to start a thread on what I do. We make small squares and round bales on approximately 250 acres. I will periodically update this thread. This past week I pulled off a couple firsts that I was not expecting. Making hay in November is not a first as we did it in 2021 and try to make it a regular event just because nobody does it and a lot of people say it can't be done. I find November hay to be some of the easiest and greenest hay to make but you have to be patient. This year's was no exception. It started with mowing and tedding in the snow on Wednesday. The goal was to get a couple freeze drying events to assist in the drying of the hay. We never really got those. Low temps were low 30's. The plan was Sunday to make a decision whether to attempt dry or make baleage. Friday at 830 in the morning tedding it for the 2nd time and the dust was coming off from it. 1030 I was raking and 1pm we started baling. If you had told me I was going to make dry hay in 2 days in November I would say your crazy but everything came together in an unusual way.

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   / Hay Making on a Different Scale #2  
Great pictures!!!

I didn't know that you can cut hay when there is frost on it. How do you dry it out before baling?

Here in East Texas, our hay loses it's protein when it gets cold out. If the hay isn't baled before that happens, it's labeled as late season, low quality cow hay, and sold for half the price of the good stuff. Of course, nothing really grows here once temps get below 80 degrees.
 
   / Hay Making on a Different Scale #3  
Lookin good! I have made good hay in November, too.
Others think your crazy until it’s done and you have hay and they dont.
 
   / Hay Making on a Different Scale
  • Thread Starter
#4  
Great pictures!!!

I didn't know that you can cut hay when there is frost on it. How do you dry it out before baling?

Here in East Texas, our hay loses it's protein when it gets cold out. If the hay isn't baled before that happens, it's labeled as late season, low quality cow hay, and sold for half the price of the good stuff. Of course, nothing really grows here once temps get below 80 degrees.
That was snow on it. What I was hoping for was freeze drying to assist in the drying process. What I got instead was low humidity and 10mph breeze for 2 nights allowing the hay to dry down in record time.
 
   / Hay Making on a Different Scale #5  
Around here we leave at least 6 inches of our alfalfa hay standing to go through the winter. Cutting it too short at the end of the season will hurt your stand for the next year.
 
   / Hay Making on a Different Scale
  • Thread Starter
#6  
Another 11 acres down. If we bale it dry today it will make a new record. Here is a picture of freeze drying. Had temperature into the 20’s yesterday and today.
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   / Hay Making on a Different Scale
  • Thread Starter
#7  
And this brings my season to an official close. 116 bales. 11/13 is now the latest I have baled dry. Had 2 days of freeze drying that I got to take advantage of. Probably the first time taking 4 cuttings dry

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   / Hay Making on a Different Scale #8  
Lets play a little “fall ball” !!
I like it.

You are tempting me to go cut some more….
 
   / Hay Making on a Different Scale
  • Thread Starter
#9  
My uncle said I should keep the discbine ready in case another opportunity opens. Lol
 
   / Hay Making on a Different Scale #10  
Sure is a nice looking field!!!!

What do you use the bales for?
 
 
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