How close have you come

fruitcakesa

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Mar 10, 2015
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793
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CavendishVT
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M6040
My worst case of chainsaw stupidity happened when I was cutting out the log wall on my home to install a set of french doors.
It was a warm spring day, so no helmet, chaps or gloves were in use.
I was standing near the top of an old wooden step ladder that was poorly set on rough ground.
Of course, in the middle of a cut, the ladder decided to topple over.
For some idiotic reason I did not drop the saw as I fell and in the tumble, the still rotating chain hit the top my left hand between the thumb and first finger. Blood was everywhere and my wife came running at my call for help.
Miraculously, the chain only cut "non-essential" flesh and no bone, tendon or ligament was touched.
I have had to endure my wife's I told you so's since but also have been a scrupulous user of total safety gear when I cut.
 

Jstpssng

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Back when I was young and dumb I cut a pair of chaps almost in half while doing powerline R/W maintenance. The saw went through them like butter but I felt them pulling so picked the saw up just as it went through my jeans and put a 1 inch slice in my kneecap. I made 3 more cuts before it registered what I'd done; I shut the saw off, walked up to the foreman with the chaps in one hand and my saw in the other and he simply said "I'll see you back at the motel."

I agree with others, watching a video isn't enough; it's best to get some hands on training.

PS: There are days when you simply shouldn't be running a saw; the scenario I mentioned above was one of those. It was a Monday AM and I had worked late at my weekend job; I was so tired on my 200 mile commute that I was falling asleep on my motorcycle, eventually pulling over and taking a nap stretched out on an asphalt parking lot.
 
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coobie

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S.Michigan
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Kubota RTV 1100c, JD 740,Kioti DK 40 with KL401 loader .
Back when I was young and dumb I cut a pair of chaps almost in half while doing powerline R/W maintenance. The saw went through them like butter but I felt them pulling so picked the saw up just as it went through my jeans and put a 1 inch slice in my kneecap. I made 3 more cuts before it registered what I'd done; I shut the saw off, walked up to the foreman with the chaps in one hand and my saw in the other and he simply said "I'll see you back at the motel."

I agree with others, watching a video isn't enough; it's best to get some hands on training.

PS: There are days when you simply shouldn't be running a saw; the scenario I mentioned above was one of those. It was a Monday AM and I had worked late at my weekend job; I was so tired on my 200 mile commute that I was falling asleep on my motorcycle, eventually pulling over and taking a nap stretched out on an asphalt parking lot.
Good story,thanks.
 

John_Mc

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Aug 11, 2001
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3,063
Location
Monkton, Vermont
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NH TC33D Modified with belly pan, limb risers & FOPS for work in the woods
The first thing is to get yourself some proper personal protective equipment: some chainsaw chaps or protective pants, a helmet, hearing and eye protection. There are lots of folks who seem to think they are just too tough to need this stuff or that their superior coordination.skills/intelligence will keep them out of trouble. However, a chainsaw doesn't care how tough you think you are (or even how tough you actually are), and no one plans to have an accident. The ER rooms are full of people who thought they'd be OK, for whatever reason.

As others have noted, the place to start is with some organized, well thought out hand-on training. YouTube is a poor substitute. Finding a friend or neighbor who seems to know their stuff is only slightly better: it's hard to say whether they really have any knowledge to impart. Also, even if someone knows how to safely operate a saw, that alone is no guarantee they have any skill at teaching others.

The best chainsaw safety and productivity training I've seen in my area is through the Game Of Logging (GOL). At least the guys teaching it in my area are top-notch teachers and well organized. I've heard the same about those in neighboring states. However, all of the training organizations seem to be concentrated in the Northeast.

Tim Ard of Forest Applications Training teaches a very similar program. I have no personal experience with him, nor have I met someone who has been through his training, but what I hear through the grapevine is good. He travels around a number of states, but seems to have some concentration in the Southeastern US.

Neither GOL or Forest Applications are cheap, but they are cheaper than a trip to the ER, and better than ending up with scars that scare the heck out of your kids.
 

wheelbuilder

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Oct 30, 2018
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535
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Upstate, NY
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1988 Bolens/Iseki 1502, also Sears GT5000
At the very least you should read thru the US Forest Service's chainsaw operator's course student's book. It's free from them. If you can actually take the class, all the better.
 

fruitcakesa

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
793
Location
CavendishVT
Tractor
M6040
The first thing is to get yourself some proper personal protective equipment: some chainsaw chaps or protective pants, a helmet, hearing and eye protection. There are lots of folks who seem to think they are just too tough to need this stuff or that their superior coordination.skills/intelligence will keep them out of trouble. However, a chainsaw doesn't care how tough you think you are (or even how tough you actually are), and no one plans to have an accident. The ER rooms are full of people who thought they'd be OK, for whatever reason.

As others have noted, the place to start is with some organized, well thought out hand-on training. YouTube is a poor substitute. Finding a friend or neighbor who seems to know their stuff is only slightly better: it's hard to say whether they really have any knowledge to impart. Also, even if someone knows how to safely operate a saw, that alone is no guarantee they have any skill at teaching others.

The best chainsaw safety and productivity training I've seen in my area is through the Game Of Logging (GOL). At least the guys teaching it in my area are top-notch teachers and well organized. I've heard the same about those in neighboring states. However, all of the training organizations seem to be concentrated in the Northeast.

Tim Ard of Forest Applications Training teaches a very similar program. I have no personal experience with him, nor have I met someone who has been through his training, but what I hear through the grapevine is good. He travels around a number of states, but seems to have some concentration in the Southeastern US.

Neither GOL or Forest Applications are cheap, but they are cheaper than a trip to the ER, and better than ending up with scars that scare the heck out of your kids.

I took a local GOL course years ago, a gift from my wife, and have blessed her for it as my safety and falling skills prior to taking it were "self taught".
I no longer approach a leaning tree with trepidation since I can control it safely. Along with all the other basic safety items such as chain brake on whenever you move more than a few steps.
 

John_Mc

Elite Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2001
Messages
3,063
Location
Monkton, Vermont
Tractor
NH TC33D Modified with belly pan, limb risers & FOPS for work in the woods
I said my piece above about getting some formal training above.

If you still want to find some good videos, check out this series by Husqvarna. It's very similar to what is taught in the Level 1 Game of Logging class. It's no substitute for attending the live class, but it is a good set of videos.
Husqvarna Chainsaw Usage and Safety Training
 

jd2130

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Apr 27, 2019
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Ontario
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John Deere 2130, kioti ck25, Craftsman YT3000
Husqvarna has a few good instructional videos. If you search for "Husqvarna instructional chainsaw video" you'll find some good ones.
 

deserteagle71

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Dec 30, 2017
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896
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northern Nevada
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John Deere 2020 diesel, Kubota M7060HDC12
Been using a chainsaw since about 1957 and my only heat is my wood stove. Never had a close call - never had any damage to body or clothes!
 
 
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