How long before Compact Diesels are obsolete?

Phil Timmons

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Mar 18, 2008
Messages
95
Electric vehicle success is going to depend largely on solar affordability. I think it has been coming down but haven't done any research to support that notion. I have seen a large solar field just east of me. The panels are on automated pivots that follow the sun. I'm talking several hundred acres as far as the eye can see.

Most of us have some solar panels in use. I have been pleased with my limited use of panels to keep batteries charged.

The problem with solar on equipment that operates during the day is the need for a separate battery bank. The solar panels will need to charge an idle battery bank during the day to then transfer that charge to the batteries that are parked at night
We avoid that with "Grid Tie" where available. The Solar PV is tied the Grid, and the Battery Charger is also tied to the grid. The grid gets the valuable Day Time Peak Use supply from the Solar PV, and then we charge the batteries when it is handy for us. Win-Win for most local grids.
 

coobie

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Rural Michigan? Grew up there. A smaller or reducing local economy make for difficult budgets. No one wants to invest in a risky or potential shrinking market. In much of the US we use a "Service Life" model. Most components have a 25 to 50 year Service Life. So that means we will replace up to 4% per year (for 25 year life equipment) or down to 2% (for 50 year life equipment) any given year. Add on some growth (again, for growing local economies) of 1 to 2% per year -- and we are replacing or expanding around 5% every year.

So for now, in Texas -- folks just ask about chargers, and we are happy to put in new transformers, lines, etc., as needed. Happy to sell the extra electricity to a new customer. Locally that means the grid is continually renewing all around US. But again, that is an expanding market and economy.

Sort of ironic on the reducing or shrinking Michigan model -- if Michigan had embraced EVs, upfront, the whole region would be leading US. Instead they half-assed the Volt, and then the dealers backstabbed the whole thing.
I see Texas did well this past winter with their electric grid :ROFLMAO: Search Eddie walker post(rural living) on how long his neutral primary line has been laying on the ground UNFIXED..Little food for thought if you think the NEW GREEN deal is the answer you my friend are WRONG..Been in this business for well over 40 years..
 
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Phil Timmons

Bronze Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
95
I see Texas did well this past winter with their electric grid :ROFLMAO: Search Eddie walker post(rural living) on how long his neutral primary line has been laying on the ground UNFIXED..Little food for thought if you think the NEW GREEN deal is the answer you my friend are WRONG..Been in this business for well over 40 years..
Here is what we (should) have learnted regarding the Texas Snowpocalypse:

1. Good Regulation = Good Results.
2. Bad Regulation = Bad Results.
3. No Regulation (Texas) = Stupid. ;)

but as far as 40 years, you may want to consider that trying to drive forward while looking in the rear-view mirror does not always work the best.

You may (or may not) like some of this. Maybe try the first 10 minutes or so.

Good stuff for opening minds that can still be opened >>>

 

Phil Timmons

Bronze Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
95
I see a lot of the discussion on here about batteries, batteries, batteries.

That may not be the full path ahead.

Anyone look this over? Any thoughts?

 

coobie

Super Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
5,662
Location
S.Michigan
Tractor
Kubota RTV 1100c, JD 740,Kioti DK 40 with KL401 loader .
Here is what we (should) have learnted regarding the Texas Snowpocalypse:

1. Good Regulation = Good Results.
2. Bad Regulation = Bad Results.
3. No Regulation (Texas) = Stupid. ;)

but as far as 40 years, you may want to consider that trying to drive forward while looking in the rear-view mirror does not always work the best.

You may (or may not) like some of this. Maybe try the first 10 minutes or so.

Good stuff for opening minds that can still be opened >>>

What is your back ground in the electric gird? Just curious
 

Phil Timmons

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Mar 18, 2008
Messages
95
What is your back ground in the electric gird? Just curious
Worked all three sides on Engineering side -- EPC Contractor, Engineer of Record, and Owner's Rep. -- Technical side -- Texas Master and J-Man.
Did some time as a Site Engineer for the Big Generator -- TXU, and later as a Staff Engineer for them for compliance, and then a bunch of Substation Design and Build since. My preference would some HVDC, but we do not have a lot of that going on.


You were correct -- the Eddie Walker story is out there. I had gotten notices that Oncor (that is our Poles and Wires for the Public Utilities area -- non-Co-op areas) was looking to drag a bunch of Engineers back in for local assignments. My guess is Eddie's area may be "missing" an Engineer?
 

coobie

Super Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2004
Messages
5,662
Location
S.Michigan
Tractor
Kubota RTV 1100c, JD 740,Kioti DK 40 with KL401 loader .
Worked all three sides on Engineering side -- EPC Contractor, Engineer of Record, and Owner's Rep. -- Technical side -- Texas Master and J-Man.
Did some time as a Site Engineer for the Big Generator -- TXU, and later as a Staff Engineer for them for compliance, and then a bunch of Substation Design and Build since. My preference would some HVDC, but we do not have a lot of that going on.


You were correct -- the Eddie Walker story is out there. I had gotten notices that Oncor (that is our Poles and Wires for the Public Utilities area -- non-Co-op areas) was looking to drag a bunch of Engineers back in for local assignments. My guess is Eddie's area may be "missing" an Engineer?
Why do you need a engineer for a downed power line ?? You need a electric lineman to fix it..
 

Phil Timmons

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Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
95
Why do you need a engineer for a downed power line ?? You need a electric lineman to fix it..
In a sane world, yes.

But in this case -- to get the work assigned and make sure it happens.
 

grsthegreat

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north idaho
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Why do you need a engineer for a downed power line ?? You need a electric lineman to fix it..
the reason nothing gets done out in the field is due to the engineers. i was just at a job for a friend of mine getting power to his new house. line crew was there along with the engineer. the engineer is running off of these tangents telling us how we cant run power the way were planning, telling us how to do it the proper way. after 30 minutes of back and forth he leaves. the foreman comes over to us and tells us hell put it in the way we wanted to. there was no problem with that method.
 

Phil Timmons

Bronze Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
95
the reason nothing gets done out in the field is due to the engineers. i was just at a job for a friend of mine getting power to his new house. line crew was there along with the engineer. the engineer is running off of these tangents telling us how we cant run power the way were planning, telling us how to do it the proper way. after 30 minutes of back and forth he leaves. the foreman comes over to us and tells us hell put it in the way we wanted to. there was no problem with that method.
hahaha ahhhh. I feel your pain.

Some days, I help cause it.

Anymore, I try to do like the Penguins in the kid's movie Madagascar.

"Smile and Wave, just Smile and Wave."
 
 
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