Hydrostatic Transmissions.

   #1  

Anonymous Poster

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Hi, What makes hydrostatic Transmissions good or bad to have on a Tractor?


Thanks, John.
 
  
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#2  
OP
A

Anonymous Poster

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I have unbelieveable "control" of my tractor (BX2200) while cutting and doing other chores. The transmission seems to be very durable and have not seen many posts if any, reference any problems with the Hydrostatic. I don't think that you can go wrong going with a Hydrostatic and you will see that the extra money spent will be worth it.
 
   #3  

frank_f15

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Mar 30, 2001
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BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
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kubota b2400- R4 tires
i personally like the ability to control ground speed while leaving the rpm where i have it set. for doing loader work, and in close work hydro can not be beat. they are a bit more expensive to buy . have u tried out a hydro? also like the idea of changing from forward to reverse, no clutching and no shifting.
 
   #4  

hillslider

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Jun 5, 2003
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385
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MN
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Kubota L3130 JD X750 and X350
I am a proud owner of L3130HST. The hyd. transmission is great. My property is rather hilly and I can back up the steep hills and when I reach the top I can let off the pedal and the hydrostatic will hold itself on the hill until I depress it to go back down. There is no holding the brake and trying to get it into gear before you go rocketing down the hill. Also, for mowing it is the best trans to have. Very quick and easy to change directions. I really recomend the hydrostatic. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 
   #5  

SageBrush

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Jun 17, 2003
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Jacksonville, AL
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Kubota, JD and a Grillo
Slight loss of pto power and heat are the cons. The HST tractor is great with a loader. Even with a glide shift you still need to work the clutch when going slow or when your digging into a pile of dirt and a regular gear tractor is much slower in changing direction than the hydro or glide, sync etc..

Its my opinion that gear transmissions belong in the field more than hydros. When they start putting the HST types in big AG tractors then that might change. I love the HST's on the small tractors. For pulling plows all day and such, I choose GST or straight gears. A compact with a loader will probably be better with a HST. I pull a lot, so I went with a glide L4330 for my compact. I do have the HST type tranny's on my mowing only equipment and will never go back to the old stuff. No comparison in tight areas. Lifiting off the pedal is all it takes to stop and you don't have to down shift before a hill.

Most people feel more comfortable on a hydro and anyone can operate one without much pratice. Thats good if you want the average wife to run it. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif Which is a + sometimes.
 
   #6  

Alan L.

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Apr 6, 2000
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Grayson County, TX
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Kubota B2710
1. Infinite speed control just by pushing or letting off the pedal slightly.

2. Ability to change directions quickly, keeping your hands on the steering wheel and loader joystick.

3. Ability to move tractor from the ground while putting on attachments.

4. Safety - when you let off the pedal, the tractor stops.

5. Resale.
 
   #7  

sandyc

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Mar 26, 2003
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Steep Falls, Maine
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BX 2380
Totally agree with the all of the previous posts. Hst's are great for loader, snowblower and plowing! Wouldn't go back if you paid me!
 
   #8  

markie61

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Mar 31, 2001
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1,367
Location
Northern Virginia
Tractor
2019 Rural King RK55HC with Loader & Backhoe; 2001 New Holland TC40D with Loader
</font><font color="blue" class="small">( There is no holding the brake and trying to get it into gear before you go rocketing down the hill )</font>

Plus, keep in mind that tractors have brakes only on the rear wheels. With 4WD and HST, the engine will brake all wheels, which is important when (not "if") the rear wheels come up off the ground. One of my scarier incidents in the old 2WD Ford was sliding towards a ditch while trying to find reverse. I dropped the loader, but if the distance had been shorter.... /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
Mark
 
 
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