Is the interest rate worth the credit history?

   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history? #11  
In my opinion buying a new Mercedes for a first car is unwise no matter what your work or FICA score is. Living rich will keep him poor. The money he lost on this car could have been a downpayment on a home. A home is the best investment most people make.
I'm old and at the financial point where I could buy a new Mercedes cash but that would be a foolish waste of money I won't do. I rather see him reevaluate his priorities.
Re-read the original post. The kid was 16ish when he bought a 12ish year old Mercedes. He wants to buy a newER USED car that's more dependable.

No new cars involved.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history? #12  
It is clear in the world we live in having this kind of thing on your "record" is a good thing if the payments are made. Like it or not it is the world we live in.

What I would do is make sure there is no fee for paying it off early. Get the loan, let him make one month of payments, then on month two pay the thing off. He finishes making payments to you at zero interest, he gets the loan on his "books" and all is good. Make sure you get the title re done with no lean on it.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
  • Thread Starter
#13  
This is just my opinion with no hateful intentions.
Agreed.

Let me give you a little story...

Last weekend he came home and he only has to drive 3.5 hours. Didn't ask me for any money. I however still gave him $40 for gas for the travel to go back. I told him my father always did the same for me even though I didn't ask for it, and I feel like I'd be letting my dad down not doing the same in return.

Likewise, when I lived 6 hours from my parents in my 20's, I told them I was going to go looking for a new (used "high dollar" car/truck). My mom told me they would give me a interest free loan so I don't have to pay interest. Always thought my parents were broke LMAO. I took them up on the offer so I didn't have to pay interest.

This is exactly why I'd do the same for our son.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
  • Thread Starter
#14  
My credit score is currently 820
The last time I checked, mine was 845. Wife's was slightly lower.

Honestly, no clue why it goes up or down on my end as I'm not a banker. I actually kind of gave up on it.

I do know from a business standpoint, credit is actually good as long as you can pay your bills. I see it no different from a personal standpoint.

Take out a 4 year car loan, pay it of (or even quicker) because you can afford the car payments, looks good and yes you did pay some interest, but that is the cost of doing business and not taking money out of your account personally.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
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#15  
When I got out of boot camp and went to my A school, I was shocked to see the main road leading to the Base's gates was ridden with predator car lots waiting to take advantage of all the 18 year old kids with a fat bank account and a steady paycheck.
ANY business off a military base is predatory IMO.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
  • Thread Starter
#16  
In my opinion buying a new Mercedes for a first car is unwise no matter what your work or FICA score is. Living rich will keep him poor. The money he lost on this car could have been a downpayment on a home. A home is the best investment most people make.
The kid was 17, saved up 12K after 2 years of working, and wanted to spend 7.5K on a Mercedes, this after passing up a BMW, Saab and Audi because he followed "my rules".

We both told him we wouldn't do it, but he earned the right in our opinion to make that decision on his own hoping he learns from a potential mistake.

The Mercedes was literally from a German widow off of Fort Bragg whose daughter was selling it for her. Honestly, from what I saw 3 years ago after driving and meeting the mom, it wasn't a bad private sale IMO other than the one rule which was broken and he knew it, that being able to take the used car to your mechanic to check out.

Thing is no matter how good the car seems, it's a Mercedes and sooner or later it's going to cost you money. He didn't see that but I'll let it slide because I did see it coming.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
  • Thread Starter
#17  
It is clear in the world we live in having this kind of thing on your "record" is a good thing if the payments are made. Like it or not it is the world we live in.

What I would do is make sure there is no fee for paying it off early. Get the loan, let him make one month of payments, then on month two pay the thing off. He finishes making payments to you at zero interest, he gets the loan on his "books" and all is good. Make sure you get the title re done with no lean on it.
Little confused by your post.

He could pay us as we'd just pay for it with cash, no interest charged on his end.

I agree with your comment about having a "record" of payments which is why I started with g thread.

Paying off a loan early with no fee is a no brainer IMO. My line of thinking is take out a 5 year loan, and pay it off early, have that payment history for credit on his that looks good, and he may be better off going that route.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
  • Thread Starter
#18  
How much money is he going to pay in interest on the loan over its life?
Just going off of 18K financed at 5%, for 5 years that would put him at $2,300 in interest over those 5 years at a monthly payment around $340 a month.

Thing is, I'd have no qualms having him pay us $500 a month for 3 years. At that same percentage rate for 3 years, he'd be paying around $1,900 in interest.
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history?
  • Thread Starter
#19  
No new cars involved.
I'm pushing 60. NEVER bought a new car in my life, always used. Wife the same way, one reason why we think a lot alike even though we met in our mid 30's.

My father didn't buy his first new car ever until age 73 :ROFLMAO:

I don't want to dwell on the past for my son, but he realized in the grand scheme of things he most likely made a mistake buying a used Mercedes. That hopefully is a good thing;)
 
   / Is the interest rate worth the credit history? #20  
Agreed.

Let me give you a little story...

Last weekend he came home and he only has to drive 3.5 hours. Didn't ask me for any money. I however still gave him $40 for gas for the travel to go back. I told him my father always did the same for me even though I didn't ask for it, and I feel like I'd be letting my dad down not doing the same in return.

Likewise, when I lived 6 hours from my parents in my 20's, I told them I was going to go looking for a new (used "high dollar" car/truck). My mom told me they would give me a interest free loan so I don't have to pay interest. Always thought my parents were broke LMAO. I took them up on the offer so I didn't have to pay interest.

This is exactly why I'd do the same for our son.
We've done the same one time for both of our kids. They had the money. We just didn't want to see them spend down their grub stake in case they ran into an emergency, and we didn't want them to have to pay interest. This allows them to have a safety net. IF they run into problems, we'd buy the car from them, sell it, and distribute any amounts accordingly based on loan balance.

Of course, mom and dad, you are eating the interest that you'd be earning in a CD. It's not so much the amount of the loan, as you'll get that back. But you won't get any interest. That part is the gift.

Let's say you loan the kid $20K for 5 years. And let's say you'd make about $8K in interest over 5 years.

The gift is $8K over 5 years, or about $1600 per year, not a $20K lump.

My father loaned one of my sisters money to buy a business. They signed a promissory note and he charged her the same interest as he'd make on a CD. But she had no timeline to pay it back. It worked out well and she made payments whenever possible. When he passed away, we split the estate 5 ways (5 of us kids), then she payed each one of us 1/5 of the balance.
 
 
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