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rambler

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Jul 6, 2003
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1,992
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MN
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Ford 960, 7700, TW20, 1720; IHC H, 300; Ollie S77
I can't stand the cold. Absolutely hate winter time and any temps below 60F. The heat on the other hand I handle just fine. There's always a shade tree or cold drink to provide immediate relief if you overheat.

Oh my! 50-70 is the perfect temps, I'd rather be 55 outside than 75.

'Here' when it is 95 degrees out, the humidity is the same. It's aweful. Sufficating.

Cold is ok down to about zero, if there is no wind.

The minus 30 for lows, minus 17 for a high we had the other week was kinda much, but - at minus 9 with no wind, I worked up a bit of a sweat just doing normal chores, was only in my shirt & pants, cap, a hooded sweat shert, and a thin coveralls.

It's all what you are used to, but 60 is about perfect temp for working outdoors, don't really want it much warmer! :)

Neighbor of mine came from Arizona, the 115 degree heat. We were chatting one hot summer, it was about 90. I said so which is worse, the dry heat of 115 down there or our humid heat up here? No contest at all, she said the humid heat up here is aweful compared to 115 down there.

--->Paul
 

mojoinco

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Joined
Mar 18, 2008
Messages
585
Location
Colorado
Tractor
TN55
2 weeks ago it was minus temps and some wind chill. A pair of insulated coveralls (with hood), a good hat, with gloves, and some polar fleece. Oh, and a balaclava to breath through. Wind is almost everything (well, below 10f it is tough on the throat). Today, it was almost 60f. No coveralls or anything else. Next week?

We have been using the big squares for the last year or two. Much easier to put away. Maybe 10 minutes versus an hour for small bales. If I had cattle I might consider the round bales. But with only a couple of horses, these work fine. Though cattle hay would likely be different. The only down side is that for horse hay you have to be more critical of the appearance of the bales as one bad small bale is nothing compared to 800 or 1100 pound bales with bad hay in them.
 
  
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D7E

D7E

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May 10, 2006
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manitoba
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Versatile 895 Versatile 876 Ford TW20 Ford TW5 MF 3505 FWA MF 390 FWA Ford 7600 Fiat 766 FWA JD 2030 MF 165 MF 35 Fordson major x 3 CAT 416 b Backhoe Case 580 b backhoe MF
Going to WI too?

Finally got a bit of info out of one of the drivers,Not sure if it's all gone to the same place but apparently turtle lake for the last load .
 
  
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D7E

D7E

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May 10, 2006
Messages
2,261
Location
manitoba
Tractor
Versatile 895 Versatile 876 Ford TW20 Ford TW5 MF 3505 FWA MF 390 FWA Ford 7600 Fiat 766 FWA JD 2030 MF 165 MF 35 Fordson major x 3 CAT 416 b Backhoe Case 580 b backhoe MF
If you look real close at the pics you can see the tops of the alfalfa sticking up thru the snow.

Money in the bank... rolling out of those fields! ;)

I used to sit in haystacks hunting coyotes at those temps. Now, if it was +90F at that time; you'd have to call 911 for me... wouldna made it off the stack!

Heated truck - heated tractor. The only time it's nippy is when you strap the bales down. I'd do it for $175-$225/ton.

Thanks for sharin' - D7E.

AKfish

I wish......Heater is not working in the loader tractor and the rear window is broken,$175 a ton would be nice too..!
500 squares have gone and i think about 100 second cut nice stuff left now and then start thinking about advertising 450 rounds.Almost 400 round went straight off the field to local farmers this summer,could've done with more of that..!
 
 
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