Moving a Tree..

   #1  

Jesse11

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Anyone have an idea of about how big of a root ball I would need maintain to move a 15 to 20 ft pear tree? I plan to trim it back to about 10,or 12 ft before moving it but I know I need to keep as much of the original roots as possible.. the thing is its just me, and all by hand with no equipment to lift it.. The trunk is about 8 to 10 inches in diameter if that helps any..
 
   #2  

Mudfarmer

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Rule of thumb:the roots go out to the drip line (end of foliage). Start there and take a semi circle down under the tree. Cut off at least a third of the branches. Good luck, hope your back holds up.
Mf
 
   #3  

bcjmmac

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If you can, dig a trench 1/2 way around the tree in the spring (severing the roots) and leave the tree until the fall (keep the trench free of dirt so that the roots don't grow into it but instead grow inside the trench). In the fall, continue the trench & prune the limbs back (~25% of tree).
You can scoup the tree with a FEL; otherwise, it will be very hard to move the tree/loosen the bottom roots.
Put lots of bone meal & some compost in the new hole then water it a lot after moving to keep the tree from drying out/get the roots going.
 
  
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Jesse11

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Thank you for your speed replies,I have no experience about this,very helpful for me.:thumbsup:
 
   #5  

smstonypoint

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Anyone have an idea of about how big of a root ball I would need maintain to move a 15 to 20 ft pear tree? I plan to trim it back to about 10,or 12 ft before moving it but I know I need to keep as much of the original roots as possible.. the thing is its just me, and all by hand with no equipment to lift it.. The trunk is about 8 to 10 inches in diameter if that helps any..

Jesse,

I don't want to be a party-pooper, but I think you may be biting off more than you can chew if you can't access some equipment.

According to this site, http://www.utextension.utk.edu/mtnpi/handouts/Field Production/Rootball_Weights.pdf, the combined weight of a 8" diameter tree and its root ball would be 4.8 tons.

Steve
 
   #6  

om21braz

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Jesse,

I don't want to be a party-pooper, but I think you may be biting off more than you can chew if you can't access some equipment.

According to this site, http://www.utextension.utk.edu/mtnpi/handouts/Field Production/Rootball_Weights.pdf, the combined weight of a 8" diameter tree and its root ball would be 4.8 tons.

Steve
+1 I'm afraid you're going to need someone like the folks in the link below and/or similiar equipment on that size tree.

The World's Leader in Tree Transplant, Relocation and Lanscaping with Large Trees. Whether it is hundreds of trees or that one special tree, Environmental Design can move, relocate and transplant the World's largest trees.
 
   #7  

MarkV

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Good luck, trees that size don't survive transplanting well unless it is done with a large tree spade. If it is an important tree I would see if any nursery's in your area operate tree spades.

MarkV
 
   #8  

ncnurseryman

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I agree with the idea off a tree spade. I have used many ball and burlap trees and a deciduous tree is best dug when dormant and even then sometimes they can't handle the stress of being dug. One of the biggest reasons they die after replanting is not getting enough continous water for the next several months so they can get reestablished.
 
   #9  

Groo

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I've always heard 1' radius root ball for each 1" of trunk diameter.

If you've got a backhoe and you only plan on moving it a few feet, maybe you could just drag it in a trench and make it a DIY (or if its still about the size you can buy them in stores), otherwise, call in the pros.

I moved some juniper shrubs like that, and went about 50/50 for survival
 

jmurray01

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I did have a pedal John Deere once...
Rule of thumb:the roots go out to the drip line (end of foliage). Start there and take a semi circle down under the tree. Cut off at least a third of the branches. Good luck, hope your back holds up.
Mf
Me too. I moved a tree (apple tree) a couple of years ago and was in bed for days, then walking with a limp for weeks.

Make sure you know how to lift without putting a strain on your spine.
 
 
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