Plowing County Road??

   / Plowing County Road?? #71  
My suggestion is to get a copy of your county budget, find what they pay for plowing, and then show up at the highway department meeting, and county commissioner meeting with those figures and tell them they can either pay you for the plowing, or you will deduct that amount from your county taxes. If they refuse either, get a good lawyer, take them to court, and roast them. Oh, and roast them in your local, state, and national news media too. Name NAMES.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #72  
My county road used to be on a school bus route, which meant that our road was plowed quite often. Since the kids that used to ride the bus not longer do so, our road is no longer plowed, like at all. We have had two separate snow events this winter. Each dumped about 6 inches of snow. For some, that's not a ton, for us, that's worthy of sending the grader down the road, which has yet to happen.

My county road is gravel, well, somewhat. Its mostly dirt with some old gravel they put down at least 10 years ago. Its about 3 miles long, with windy twists and turns and steep climbs. Everyone on my road has my phone number and call me when they inevitably end up in the ditch. Even when the road is plowed, they end up in the ditch. I am happy to pull them out using my tractor.

Here I am a few years ago pulling a truck out
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Since we are no longer getting plowed out, at least in a timely fashion, I am considering running my tractor with my inverted snow blower down the road and back. What are your thoughts on this?

The county has been receptive of us doing our own road "maintenance" during the summer with washboard smoothing. We just cant use a steel blade for fear of sparking a fire, but they recommended dragging tires and chain link fence down the road. But snow removal might be pushing it?

I donno, just a thought. We are expecting another storm soon, that is forecast to dump about 9 inches in a few days.
They used to not plow our road much so get with the others on the road to take turns when needed that the road needs to be plowed because you need propane and the gas trucks won’t go down your road until it’s plowed and you’re dangerously low to running out.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #73  
Yes. It was all on my dime. People offered to pay me something, but I of course refused. "Just help the next guy." was all I responded with. I didn't do it for the money.

3 of the 4 people I pulled out of the ditch were neighbors, and they called me. The other guy, in a Jeep SUV I watched go into the ditch up ahead of me.
My neighbors and friends know I'll work for a batch of homemade chocolate chip cookies... Whether it's plowing them or clearing trees for a barn they want to put up. If someone insists on paying, and just won't give up, I'll suggest they donate either firewood or cash to our local "WoodBank" firewood donation program, or show up for our next volunteer get together to help process logs into firewood.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #74  
Man, I think some of you guys should lighten up. In rural area like ours, there are miles and miles of roads. and not many people. The county has limited equipment and very limited funds and are forced to prioritize road plowing. I find that the people who demand that the county to be out their to plow there road first when the first snowflake falls are usually the one who ***** most vehemently about having to pay taxes.
Others who demand cash payment from their neighbors every time they do a neighborly service are not people who I would want as my neighbor. I have often cleared several my neighbors drives for free. And I often get surprises such as a gift box full of beef or an expensive set of thermal cups, as a token of their gratitude. To me me that is much more rewarding form of compensation.
You've never met my criminal neighbors then. Yes, they have stole from me, they pollute in many ways, they make life here miserable and less than safe, the LAST thing I will do is do ANYTHING for them. If could afford to move, I would, but who's to say the next neighborhood would be any better.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #75  
A friend of ours recently bought a fix-er-upper house in blue collar part of Florida, to escape winter. His new neighbor was very happy to see the house get some love, and now takes care of their yard over the summers when the house is empty and watches it otherwise. This neighbor tells of the no good riff-raff that had lived there: basically, if he had ever seen one of them one his property, he would have shot them and pulled the body into his house. In telling them this, he brandished his chrome .44, to good effect, I am told. Some states have liberal gun laws, and I suppose that's not all bad.

On the other hand, it's just more pleasant to have neighbors who help one another, and all this talk about legal this and legal that is sad. If local government can't maintain a road, for whatever reason, then those who have to rely on it should have the right to maintain it, without ramifications, assuming they don't do something destructive. I am old enough to remember when common decency, and common sense, prevailed.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #76  
Yes. It was all on my dime. People offered to pay me something, but I of course refused. "Just help the next guy." was all I responded with. I didn't do it for the money.

3 of the 4 people I pulled out of the ditch were neighbors, and they called me. The other guy, in a Jeep SUV I watched go into the ditch up ahead of me.
Mmm similar storm story, grand daughter was descending a little hill headed home, Another rig got on her side and well this was the result.
Had to dig out the fifth wheel and drive the same road to retrieve the Jeep which was sketchy , but all ended well.
Old Grand 316 k mile Cherokee was fine after getting it up on the lift and checking everything cleaning snow out and rebalancing the tires. She did bump her head when the door hit her trying to get out. Just Glad she was OK.
Drive Careful out there folks and that was Really nice of you Avenger
I am sure the neighbors appreciated it.
 

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   / Plowing County Road?? #77  
I've ran a township grader for 35 years. I've got myself tangled up in this mess a couple times. I plow several rural driveways for people that don't have the resources to do so and their drives drift bad. Over the years I've had 3 complain about how I was doing it. I never opened their drives again. All other times I get cards in the mail, sometimes cash, even have people come outside when I'm there and give me a thermos of hot coffee or hot chocolate. I'm usually in their driveways in the wee hours of the morning. Might just be a blink, blink, blink of the porch lite. But I appreciate all of it.
That wouldn't fly around here. Back in the late 50's, early 60's, my cousin drove a snowplow for the township. One stormy Christmas he got permission to take his dinner break here, so he could enjoy Christmas dinner with the rest of his family. He was allowed to back the plow into our driveway so it was off the road, but he had to leave the blade up while he was here, even when it was parked. There wasn't to be even the slightest appearance that taxpayer resources were being used on a private driveway.
If anything, the powers that be are worse about that sort of thing now.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #78  
I live in a snowy part of the North East. Three comments:

1. Washington seems to do a lot less plowing than other areas of country, at least looking at the posts. In my area, the town crews get most areas done within a day unless storm is massive, but I think our taxes are higher too.

2. A story about getting plowing done. I lived at the end of a dead end street for several years. There was a large turning circle in front of my drive. The town plows would usually leave me with a 6 foot high wall of frozen packed snow at the end of my drive. I did not have any machinery to clear and was shoveling by hand. A problem I needed to solve right away.
I bought two quarts of Haig & Haig. Visited the town highway superintendent. Gave him one bottle and asked him to give the other to the driver who plowed snow in front of my drive because he never got any snow in the end, no matter how bad the storm was. I could not understand how he did it but he did. Made sure he knew my address.
I lived there three more years. The drive was always perfect with big walls of snow on either side. Much more effective than arguing about troubles in plowing.

3. Now I live more in the country and have plow equipment. I will do a neighbor's drive as a favor if they ask. I will never plow the public street because of the liability I would assume. If there is an accident, the town's attorney, the attorneys for the drivers and the town insurance companies, and any private parties' attorneys look for anyone involved and name them in the lawsuit. They are simply looking for every deep pocket they can find to throw in the mix. If you own a house, they would love to try to take it. I have been sued twice for things not my fault in events not under my control where I had only been present, not doing anything wrong. Good lawyering, not the truth, won the day, and I had to pay. Luckily only a few thousand. But it was a lesson. The court judgments did not find the truth in my case. This happens fairly often. The only thing that is complete protection is not taking the risk. Legal defense is very expensive and may not succeed. A defense attorney gets paid by the hour and has to sit through the whole trial, even if most of it has little to do with you. Don't think that you can tell the court you were experienced at the job and knew what you were doing. A good attorney can turn that completely around and a judge does not have time to be an expert in road maintenance.
I would not recommend plowing public roads unless you have a commercial liability policy for you and your machine.
 
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   / Plowing County Road?? #79  
That wouldn't fly around here. Back in the late 50's, early 60's, my cousin drove a snowplow for the township. One stormy Christmas he got permission to take his dinner break here, so he could enjoy Christmas dinner with the rest of his family. He was allowed to back the plow into our driveway so it was off the road, but he had to leave the blade up while he was here, even when it was parked. There wasn't to be even the slightest appearance that taxpayer resources were being used on a private driveway.
If anything, the powers that be are worse about that sort of thing now.

Grew up on the left side at the end of a dead end road in the 60’s and 70’s. Town plow would back up a few times to clear the whole dead end. Alot of the snow would get pushed into the end of the neighbor’s driveway on the right side. Then the plow would back into our driveway to turn around, so their tire tracks would help “clear” our driveway, plus we had no berm at the end if the driveway. Neighbors were never happy…..

This was in Fayetteville.
 
   / Plowing County Road?? #80  
maybe a plow on your tractor?...blowers are great for deeper snow...but they are slow...
 

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