Seeding Question(s)

   #1  

Greyfields

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Mar 24, 2007
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Today I seeded my first field with my seed drill (Great Plains 3-pt mounted 3P600). I'm seeding a field with a mix of oats and field peas. I planted the oats first, then ran over it all again to plant the peas.

My first question is regarding what to do next. Everything I've read says to roll a field when planting grains; but a lot of those imply the seed was broadcast spread rather than drilled. The diagram on my seed drill manual states the press wheel compacts and fills the furrow. So is rolling redundant to having a drill?

My second question is regarding ghetto-rolling. I have a nice blanket harrow. One side rips then if I invert it, the other side smooths very nicely (think of those chain link fences people used to drive around baseball fields to smooth). If I do need to follow up the drilling, running one of those with the smooth side down should work just fine, right? I've ran over a field after discing and the blanket harrow filled all the furrows nicely.
 
   #2  

MarkV

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It has always been my impression that there is no reason to roll when using a drill. Rolling when you broadcast seed is to get good ground to seed contact. Your drill is already doing that for you.

How about some info on the drill you bought.

MarkV
 
   #3  

Ford850

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The rolling is typically done when broadcast seeding. Your drill took care of that with the press wheels as you described. The harrows are used prior to seeding, to level and prepare the field for your drill. Again, sometimes when broadcast seeding a harrow is lightly dragged to bed the seed, but it doesn't sound like you should need it. Your drill should have set the seed at a consistent depth and packed it in, all in one step. I'd love to have one of those drills!
 
  
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#4  
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Greyfields

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There are ridges left between where the furrows were planted. I was afraid if I harrowed it, it would smooth it and bury the seed too deeply. So, I think I'll just let it ride as planted for now. The field does look cool. Like a giant cheese grater had gone over it.

This is the drill here:

http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/attachments/projects/80678d1183771915-real-farming-cut-drill.jpg

This is the marketing on the drill:

http://www.greatplainsmfg.com/products/compact/3p500-3p600.pdf

It's a minimum till drill. It's very heavy and cut through some of the scattered dead sod without problems. These 6' models are marketed for vineyard use, but since I only have a CUT the size was perfect. All I can say is that it's an amazing drill (even though it's my first one). The model I got was a year old model year, so it was somewhat discounted. I like the fact it's 3-pt, too, which means you can just lift at the end of a row to turn around rather than having to disengage the wheel.

In addition to the oats and field peas, I'm planting winter rye, perennial rye, winter wheat and winter barley. If I can just find a very old combine over the winter, my pigs will be eating at a much reduced cost next year. :)
 
   #5  

TNhobbyfarmer

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That is one nice looking piece of equipment. I am sooooo envious. How much did it cost. I'm sure I'll just have to daydream about getting one when I hear the cost. The CFO probably won't approve such an expenditure.
 
   #6  

Egon

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In days long gone by seed drills usually had discs to create a furrow for the seed. Many followed with a what we called a seed press and then diamond harrows. :D

This method worked well for many a bushel of grain or grass. :D
 
  
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#7  
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Greyfields

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Mar 24, 2007
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Is your CFO your wife, too? :p

The Great Plains seed drills are quite precious. You also very rarely see them for sale, which tells me people are holding onto them dearly.

I planned on getting a TYE drill, which would have cost just under $2,000. But I missed the production year and would have had to wait until next Winter to get one. So I got a deal on the GP drill because it was one model year behind and went with it. You can certainly get drills used for less money than I spent on the new one; but I was buying the baler, disc mower and rake at the same time and got a good deal in my estimation.
 
 
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