using your tractor to pull a tree over

oosik

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
15,939
Location
AMBER, WA
Tractor
2009 Kubota M6040
You will all notice - my comments are meant to offend no one. I don't care if you have a backhoe or not - I just would hope if you do - that you find a use for it.

My big pine stumps are gone in ten years. Its a race between them rotting and the coyotes digging in, around, under and thru them. I think the coyotes are looking for either chipmunks or pocket gophers. I use to have a family of badgers - long ago they were encouraged to relocate to other places. Just once too often an adult badger came at me in full attack mode..........
 

npalen

Elite Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2009
Messages
2,527
Location
Beloit, KS
Tractor
Kubota B9200 HSTD and Mahindra 3015
Ignoring friction in the sheaves, the tension should be about the same on all the lines.

That doesn't sound quite right. I would think the tension in the rope attached to the tractor to be very much less than the one tied to the tree.
 

oosik

Super Star Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
15,939
Location
AMBER, WA
Tractor
2009 Kubota M6040
All of this just brought back a thought. About thirty years ago - when both the nearest neighbor and I were a whole lot younger and had a couple wild oats left - he came over one afternoon and invited me to a "blow out". It was way out on some remote grazing land that he was converting to land suitable for wheat planting and harvesting.

There was a small draw with the normal LARGE cottonwoods down at the bottom - soaking up all the water they could. He had cut them all down and was now left with about 6 or 8 gigantic stumps. So we dug a hole completely under one stump - packed it with 70% ditching powder(dynamite) - lit the fuse and ran away really rapidly.

It blew that entire, undamaged stump about 200 yards straight up and it made an almighty "WHUMP" when it hit. We both decided that was enough excitement for quite a spell and he let the other simply rot out. A lot easier/safer to simply plow around the small area - than risk anybody getting hurt. We got to see the full size of that single stump - it was the size of a 100hp tractor.
 

radios1

Elite Member
Joined
May 3, 2018
Messages
2,813
Location
Long Island New York
Tractor
john deere la145
I have locust trees, and it can take over 100 years for locust stumps to rot.
I do use my backhoe to dig some out, because leaving all of them for 100 years, is not a good option for me.
I am already 77 years old.....just can't wait 100+ years.
you don't need to wait that long!. drill 4 1" holes in the top of each stump, fill them with pool shock(strong chlorine) cover them so rain don't disturb it, and about 2 weeks later, you can push them over and out with your foot!.. Chlorine kills and destroys DNA.. then the stump rots quick..
 

4570Man

Super Star Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2015
Messages
15,371
Location
Crossville, TN
Tractor
Kubota M59, Kubota L3800, Grasshopper 428D, Topkick dump truck, 3500 dump truck, 10 ton trailer, more lighter trailers.
That doesn't sound quite right. I would think the tension in the rope attached to the tractor to be very much less than the one tied to the tree.

The stress on the tow line should be the same assuming it’s one continuous setup. On the likely chance he’s using one set of pulleys to pull on another set pulleys the tension on the second rope is a lot higher. And the rope he uses to anchor the pulleys to the tree is under tremendous force. Like I said in my first post this isn’t something you go out in your backyard and decide to try one day. There’s a lot of money in rigging there. 20 minutes of digging with a pick axe and cutting roots with a sawzall would have made this a lot more practical.
 

Gary Fowler

Super Star Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
11,998
Location
Bismarck Arkansas
Tractor
2009 Kubota RTV 900, 2009 Kubota B26 TLB & 2010 model LS P7010
I have locust trees, and it can take over 100 years for locust stumps to rot.
I do use my backhoe to dig some out, because leaving all of them for 100 years, is not a good option for me.
I am already 77 years old.....just can't wait 100+ years.

Cedar and Cherry can take a long time also. Sometimes it just isn't practical to leave a stump to rot out especially if it is in your lawn. Nothing uglier than a rotting stump in front of your house unless it is a redneck washing machine, refrigerator or wrecked car setting in the yard.
 

GirlWhoWantsTractor

Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2015
Messages
948
Location
The Mountains of Virginia
Tractor
2018 Mahindra 26XL HST, Husqv GT48XLsi & YTH48LS
you don't need to wait that long!. drill 4 1" holes in the top of each stump, fill them with pool shock(strong chlorine) cover them so rain don't disturb it, and about 2 weeks later, you can push them over and out with your foot!.. Chlorine kills and destroys DNA.. then the stump rots quick..

Does that really work? I've got three cherry stumps in my yard I need to get rid of.
 

orezok

Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2004
Messages
2,293
Location
Mojave Desert, CA
Tractor
Kubota B7800
That doesn't sound quite right. I would think the tension in the rope attached to the tractor to be very much less than the one tied to the tree.

This a very complex system and it would be difficult to calculate. But say you have a multiple sheave pulley system. You input 100# of force on the first line. That same force is transmitted to the second line as it passes over the pulley. This happens at each change in direction. Then the magic happens. Say each sheave has 3 pulleys. Each pulley is exposed to 100# of force from each line. The sheave feels the 100# x 3 so the force is multiplied. That is how a multiple pulley system works.

Now I agree that if you put a line between the pulley and the object being lifted, that line and that line alone will feel the 300# force (same as the pulley)
 

k0ua

Epic Contributor
Joined
Jun 28, 2009
Messages
30,587
Location
Branson, Mo.
Tractor
Kioti DK35se Hydrostat
You will all notice - my comments are meant to offend no one. I don't care if you have a backhoe or not - I just would hope if you do - that you find a use for it.

My big pine stumps are gone in ten years. Its a race between them rotting and the coyotes digging in, around, under and thru them. I think the coyotes are looking for either chipmunks or pocket gophers. I use to have a family of badgers - long ago they were encouraged to relocate to other places. Just once too often an adult badger came at me in full attack mode..........

A nice osage orange will still be there when your children's children are long dead. Even my cedar stump, which was a an old looking stump when I moved here 17 years ago is still looking fine. No kicking it out or anything like that. Not everything rots quick. Sure some things do, but not everything.
 

Richard

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
4,396
Location
Knoxville, TN
Tractor
International 1066 Full sized JCB Loader/Backhoe and a John Deere 430 to mow with
I didn't watch the video (didn't want to use satellite metered download)

I can imagine what it was.

If you have to get the stump out.....I did it this way...dig on three sides....and push
 

Attachments

  • DSCN0191.jpg
    DSCN0191.jpg
    254.6 KB · Views: 67
  • DSCN0192.jpg
    DSCN0192.jpg
    303.8 KB · Views: 70
  • DSCN0199.jpg
    DSCN0199.jpg
    316.5 KB · Views: 73
  • DSCN0202.jpg
    DSCN0202.jpg
    262.9 KB · Views: 69
 
Top