What would you do about this issue?

   / What would you do about this issue? #1  

HawkinsHollow

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2019
Messages
1,224
Location
SE TN
Tractor
Branson 3015R
I have a clump of trees growing next to a retaining wall and it seems the roots have compromised the wall. It is not good! It is a pretty substantial compromise.

IMG_0075.jpg

I am a bit upset about this because I like the privacy this clump of trees provides from people coming down the street, but I understand something needs to be done. It seems this clump of trees is comprised of a Crepe Myrtle, a sizable hackberry and a Mulberry. If seems like the right thing to do for privacy sake is take out the Hackberry and Mullberry and leave the Crepe Myrtle. What would you do to solve this issue?
 
   / What would you do about this issue? #2  
I would leave it be. Yes the roots have compromised the retaining wall but at the same time they are holding back the soil. As long as the trees and roots stay alive it should be okay. Once those are gone the wall will have to be replaced to keep the dirt back.
 
   / What would you do about this issue? #3  
That is an ugly clump. I might just take the whole clump of stuff out, maybe the wall too, then landscape the area.
 
   / What would you do about this issue? #4  
Hackberry trees are notorious for splitting, and that one looks like it is growing at a lean. The larger it grows, the more money it will take to remove it. You don't need a 30' tall tree for privacy when something 8-10' would do.

Can't say much about the intregity of the retaining wall.
 
   / What would you do about this issue? #5  
Mulberry are just darn tough to kill. I have cut and painted brush killer on the stump, only to have the poison kill a nearby tree but not the mulberry. The roots really go deep too. Grrrr
 
   / What would you do about this issue? #7  
you could just surface fix the wall ... it will crack again but it will look good in the mean time. or you could dig the inside of the wall cut the roots in the way of the dig it wont be easy but totally doable and properly fix the wall the tree will survive by only cutting one or two roots ...
 
   / What would you do about this issue?
  • Thread Starter
#8  
I’d cut the entire mess down.
Yeah, it does look like a mess for sure. There are a couple small maples in there and a bit of privet. But a nicely established crepe myrtle is a shame to kill. It is a southern thing but it is a nice ornemental that you cannot kill that has beautiful flowers for a month in the summer. You can cut it to any height and it will just happily start anew from wherever you cut it. I think It would be a lot happier without the hackberry and mulberry(if I can kill it). Of the three I really thing the Crepe myrtle is the most valuable, definitely from a privacy standpoint. 2 less mature trees growing in that same place has to take a bit of stress off that wall. We will see! It is not super high on the priority list, I just noticed the wall a couple of weeks ago and wanted to see what yall though.
 
   / What would you do about this issue? #9  
Sorry to see that you're partial to 'Crap Murders'. One thing for sure, you can't kill them. If you cut one down, 10 more will pop up. OTOH, yes they do have pretty flowers once a year. I have a few around here as well but my attempts to control when and where they pop up has proven futile.
 
   / What would you do about this issue?
  • Thread Starter
#10  
Sorry to see that you're partial to 'Crap Murders'. One thing for sure, you can't kill them. If you cut one down, 10 more will pop up. OTOH, yes they do have pretty flowers once a year. I have a few around here as well but my attempts to control when and where they pop up has proven futile.
I am not really partial to them, I just think leaving the Crepe myrtle and eliminating the other 2 might be the best way forward. Especially considering I am most interested in keeping the privacy that clump provides. The Crepe Myrtle is the majority of that clump. And like you said, if you can't beat 'em join '!em
 
 
Top