Wire size for a pump?

zing

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The 6/3 direct bury is scrap that.i had on my shelf. I have no idea where it came from, it's just there. If it.was longer, I was going.to use it because it's already paid for. Now I will buy 50 feet of 6/3 and run it.over my rafters and through the top plates of my wall, and then into a junction box that will remain sealed up until I decide what I will do regarding the pump.

To get from my panel to the outside of the wall means making two very quick 90s that make conduit impossible to pull wire through. I wouldn't try it with 12/2!!

If I decide to put a pump next to my house, I can use the 6/3 direct bury wire to go from the junction box to the pump.

My debate on pump location is between running wire 1000 feet down to my pond or not.

I am sure there are people on this site that can give better advice than me because I am definitely not a plumber, but what you are thinking about a pump next to the house because of the price of the wire doesn't add up to me. Texas freezes in the winter sometimes doesn't it? If so you are either going to have to build an insulated box and keep it warm all winter, or pull the footvalve out of the pond and let the line drain every fall because you won't want the water to freeze in a pump or a tank. Then every spring you are priming 1000 feet of pipe, or maybe 2000 feet if you need a two pipe deep well design. With the pump in the pond pushing the water you need only one pipe and you don't need to prime it.
 

fried1765

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Conduit really isn't an option based on what I have to work with. I think that I will buy 50 feet of 6/3 and run it from my breaker box to a junction box on the outside of my house. If I decide to put a pump next to my house, I'm good. If I decide to run wire all the way down to the pond, I'm good. If I decide to set a meter by the pond, I've wasted some money, but not a lot.

Based on a topo map, I'm probably 30 feet higher at the house then the full water height of the pond. To be on the safe side, figure 50 feet of lift, and a thousand feet of run.

My original plan was to drill a well next to the house, but that doesn't have a lot of appeal to me. I might rethink that idea before committing to anything.

Thanks!!!

How deep to water, if you were to drill a new well at the house?
 
  
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#23  
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EddieWalker

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30 to 40 feet will probably hit water. Hundred feet would have unlimited supply.
 

Stimw

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30 to 40 feet will probably hit water. Hundred feet would have unlimited supply.

Look into washing down a well.
I have washed down about a dozen shallow wells down to 42' using 2" PVC then dropping 1 1/4" PVC in with well point. Then remove 2".
I used a garden hose for wash water. You cut teeth in the 2".
 
   #25  

plastikosmd

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My artesian is 670 ft deep, 150’ from house.
5 hp single phase pump on 40 amp breaker, 8/3 wire
 
   #26  

the old grind

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Eddie, I'd drill or have drilled a shallow well <100', put in a 1/2 hp jet pump, and use a caged poly tote to store near the barn or garden. Put the pump on a timer so as not to overdraw on a long cycle, and wire a float switch between pressure switch and electric line.

Another small pump can redistribute from storage. (solar?) We catch roof runoff in these, and gravity flow is indeed slow on totes installed several feet above the garden. That we have more rain up here shouldn't mean you can't combine concepts suggested by the group.

The TDH capacity required to pump 1000' horizontally and 30' feet up must need >1hp to get more than a trickle, and a hefty supply line to handle starting surge. (big resistive loss at big distance) I suspect your electric bill might go up noticeably like your water bill has when watering heavily. A lot of energy needed to overcome line friction, and a big investment to write off if performance disappoints.

Consider the TDH of the pump you'd use, check ampacity/gauge of the wire needed for that length of run, and ask around what is the best diameter pipe to run the 1000'. Too small could be a prob, too large could just cost too much. The 'pump at the pond' plan may give way to a simpler setup with le$$ commitment going in. Sure glad you have time before planting, and I hope what you go with works out ... the first time. t o g
 
   #27  

3Ts

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To get from my panel to the outside of the wall means making two very quick 90s that make conduit impossible to pull wire through. I wouldn't try it with 12/2!!

For quick bends, use one of these. They come in several different configurations and are available at HD & Lowes: conduit-fittings-90 deg.jpg
 
  
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#29  
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EddieWalker

EddieWalker

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The wire is run and terminated in an exterior metal junction box. I will paint it to match the siding and forget about it until I decide what I want to do. It might very well remain like this forever. But at least I have an option with it in place.

Thank you for all the help and suggestions.
 
   #30  

Old Guy in Tenn

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A pump cannot 'suck' water more than 33' above the water surface even if everything is perfect. A pump can be made to push water as high as you need it. When a pump pulls water/air from the suction line, air pressure pushes more water in to replace it. Air pressure at sea level is about 14.7 PSI so, if the pump pulls a perfect vacuum, the air pressure can push the water (.44 lbs per inch of lift) up about 33 feet. The pump will not pull a perfect vacuum, and there is friction and other restriction in the lines, so actual results will be less.

So, your pump will need to be closer to the pond so that it can push the water to you. It cannot pull the water to the house.
 
 
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