Battery based electric vehicles of today and tomorrow.

Jstpssng

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With the federal and provincial rebates, mine went from 56K to 43K.
That’s still too much, unless I can make money with it. I don’t have the time, interest or energy to get into landscaping though.
 

3930dave

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This technology is news to me.
Good to see hydro getting some love....

Something else I need to read more on..... they may be using a variable-vane approach, to reduce or eliminate the need for major water diversions @ high flow conditions.....

Gravity+Water.....I like Simple, being a simple guy..... traditional turbines need service eventually; will be interesting to see how the new designs compare, service-wise.

Rgds, D.
 
  
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Gale Hawkins

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But why? I respect your fervor on the subject, yet the percieved benefit isn’t there yet. The environmental argument would be a lot more realistic if the push was to use electric public transportation rather than personal use. As is it’s more of a financial rather than ecological transfer.
An industry already struggling does not need to lose that kind of revenue. The former big three are about 10 years away from being profitable selling EVs. Affordable 500 mi range batteries are about 10 years away as well. The people with disposable income as has been the case for the last 5 or 10 years will have to carry the EV makers for another 10 years. A person retiring with a million dollars in cash equivalents can swing high-end EVS but not the paycheck to paycheck American.
 

Jstpssng

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An industry already struggling does not need to lose that kind of revenue. The former big three are about 10 years away from being profitable selling EVs. Affordable 500 mi range batteries are about 10 years away as well. The people with disposable income as has been the case for the last 5 or 10 years will have to carry the EV makers for another 10 years. A person retiring with a million dollars in cash equivalents can swing high-end EVS but not the paycheck to paycheck American.
Yet you don't address the point of my post. If this really was about the environment, there would be much more push to get people on board with public transportation. That's why I believe that EVs are merely a transfer of wealth from one group of people to another.
 
  
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Gale Hawkins

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Yet you don't address the point of my post. If this really was about the environment, there would be much more push to get people on board with public transportation. That's why I believe that EVs are merely a transfer of wealth from one group of people to another.
You might be very well correct. How do you see it is transferring a wealth because no one is spending money that they don't want to at this point in time there is no force to move to ev's it's just something that will happen over time but it may be a long time.
 

lman

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You might be very well correct. How do you see it is transferring a wealth because no one is spending money that they don't want to at this point in time there is no force to move to ev's it's just something that will happen over time but it may be a long time.
Current policies of non energy independence drive the cost of fuel up as an incentive to move to EV's.
When fuel goes up in price, more money is being transferred. Large amounts of fuel are required in agriculture and manufacturing. When fuel prices rise, the cost of just about everything else rises also.
 

SylvainG

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That’s still too much, unless I can make money with it. I don’t have the time, interest or energy to get into landscaping though.
How about, I usually do 400 KM per week and that costs me $55 of gas per week, or $2,860 per year. I also do about 3.5 oil change per year (20,000 KM / 6,000 KM per oil change) at $65 per oil change, it's $230. With regenerative braking, you hardly use the brakes so they'll probably last as long as the car. I would change the brakes every 4 years and at a cost of $400 (I think) so that's another $100 per year saved. That's about $3,200 of cost. In electricity, for that KM per year, it will cost me around $250 so a net saving of $2,950 per year, or about $245 per month. So my monthly payment is actually similar to a compact ICE car with standard options.

There are online calculator that can help you determine how much you're going to save/spend going electric.
 
  
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Gale Hawkins

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Next panic photo will show these car owners lining up at EV stores so can save time/money by filling up while dreaming.
 

Fuddy1952

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I believe everyone is missing my point which is my prediction:
As more people switch to electric the present power grid MUST be upgraded. It has to be whether home or station charging.
This upgrading will have TWO impacts...one on the environment, one on everyone's wallet. The first will be deforestation, installing many more power lines, larger and more sub stations, etc. Who pays for this? We ALL do, so instead of the 10.6 cents/kWh I'm paying now it has to increase. If our average electric bill is $90/month it will double within a few years.
Now people will chime in with "I'm already paying $200/month!" which isn't the point since that will go to $400.
EV proponents have this idea that the manufacturing process (vehicles, batteries, power lines, transformers, solar panels, wind generators, even hydro-electric and nuclear plant facilities) cause zero pollution, zero environmental impact.
Explain where I'm wrong.
Thanks.
 
 
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