Does anyone remember? I do. Share your memories..

Ken

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When I was a kid growing up, I loved Winter, but maybe for reasons different from others. In the Winter, I didn't have to work with that garden hoe in the garden, or keep harvesting stuff all the time, no mowing to do (with a manual reel type mower), no weeds to chop down (with a yo-you; now known as a weed knife, I think), and we got to eat supper earlier. You see my Dad said you could work outside until it got dark, so supper was never until after dark, and dark came earlier in the Winter.

Of course, the really cold weather wasn't so enjoyable when I had to go milk that cow and feed the hogs.:laughing:

Bird Remember the WW11 Ration stamp book where everyone received a book for purchase of anything.
Need gas took a gas stamp food took a stamp for coffee, meat, items of clothing stamp for pair of shoes.
My parents in fall of the year butchered hogs and calves and canned the meat in wide mouth jars and tallow poured to seal the jar.
The hams and ribs were salted down with Morton salt wraped in cloth and hung in smoke house to cure with a small hickory chip fire to smoke the meat.
When we took the single shot .22 to hunt rabbits only one shot allowed .so be sure what you were aiming at.
Also all the metal, card board. clothing donated for the War effort.
And hay was put up in stacks and all the kids were used to pack the hay by walking across the stack until packed.
corn was put in shocks and used as needed.
molasses made by growing sorgram and at the proper time going to field and topping the heads and cutting the leaves off. Then taking a knife and cutting the stalks to haul to the press and squezing the juice out. powered by a mule walking in a circle to run the press. then poured into a large copper pan heated by burning rich pine and oak fire wood. to boil off the water. until the syrup was the correct thickness.
Of course walking or riding a bike with out fenders to school and it was uphill both directions.
always muddy with a cold wind blowing.
Tell g-kids of this and they just look at you cannot conceive such a life.
No after school programs. to cause mother to drive them to and wait until it is over .
No cell and usually no phone in house. didn't need to call every one that you are on the way to wal mart. for a pizza for evening meal.
just a few memories.
ken
 

sam5570

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south west virginia
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While clearing fallen branches yesterday morning from the trees bordering the creek, during one of my breaks, my mind started reflecting on some memories from my earlier days. With the advent of cooler temperatures, I started thinking about hog killing that was done in late Fall and the early Winter months, when I was growing up. This practice was a Community effort. The place where this was done varied throughout the years. Firewood was gathered, and the scalding tubs were set up. Hoists, tubs, tables and all other necessary equipment were all mainly brought on-site. After killing and gutting the hogs, they were placed in the tubs for scalding. They were then hoisted and the hair was scraped off the skin. The carcass was then cut up into different sections. The hams and shoulders were salted down and wrapped for storage. Sometimes the loins were cut up and sometimes they were left whole. Ribs were cut and the slabs used for bacon were normally left whole. Trimmings for sausage were gathered and the sausage was also ground on-site. BTW, you were required to bring your own seasoning. The fat was placed in lard cans and was later rendered for lard by the individual owner. The events were always carried out in an organized and friendly atmosphere, and all that participated, went Home with the cuts that were derived from their hog or hogs. Men, Women, and Children all participated. The Wives and Women would serve the BEST coffee that you ever tasted, and the food that they prepared and served, would make a King sick from envy. Even though you were tired, after all was said and done, you went Home with a sense of accomplishment. Especially, knowing that you had meat to help sustain your Family during the upcoming Winter months. Please share an early memory that you remember. I am positive that your fellow members, here on TBN, would enjoy reading about a past memory from earlier days. By doing this, you will have a chance to reflect upon the memory. Thanks for listening.
we did it exactly the way you described only we went to the cannery and caned our sasauge and lard and yeah the vannila on the snow was a treat for us man i know you miss them days so do i things were so simple compared to today
 

milkman

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I sure remember the hog killing, and back then, the first six of us kids was born at home, only the last three were born in the hospital. The Dr. would come as far as he could in his car and then borrow a horse and ride it to our house if it was muddy. As for the hog killing, we had a meat house and in the center was a platform suspended from the ceiling by wire (that kept the mice and rats off the meat) that held all the slabs of meat salted down. We would grind the sausage and render the lard all the same day so it was always up in the night when we were done. The next morning we had fried tender loin for breakfast and dad got the brains and scrambled eggs. The hams and shoulders were sugar cured, but I don't remember getting to eat the hams, seems the Dr. got those for the delivery charge.
 

Biggreenavalanche

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'Bout this time every year my family would pick apples by the bushel, then core and peel by the bushel, then pops would get our huge ( I mean HUGE ) copper kettle set and the fire going, the it was apple butter and apple sauce makin' time...can't tell you how many quart mason jars we made ! That was in the hills of West Virginia back in the day !
 

Diesel breath

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Nevada
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About this time every year, we head to Costco for meat. The meat is in big pieces. We have to haul it home in the back of the truck, rambling along pot holed roads, past McDonald's and Arby's to our house. We unload the meat into our custom kitchen with hickory cabinets and proceed to cut up the large pieces of meat into meal sized portions and putting them into vacuum seal bags. Sometime this process takes as long as two hours, all the while watching tv and drinking Starbucks coffee. Then we have to haul all that meat to the freezer and arrange it so it all fits. We package the bacon, chops, shoulder and roasts and place them just so carefully into the freezer. This process in draining, and when we're done we head to the yogurt shop for some vanilla yogurt with candy toppings and processed whipped cream. It tastes so good. Possibly the best flavor ever. Then we head back home and spend the next 4 hours watching more inane tv and texting on our iPhones. We play scrabble on the phones too. Ahhh. What a day! So satisfying and fulfilling. We've really come a long way since you guys with your hog killing and vanilla snow milkshakes and the women actually cooking food and serving it to you. Kinda sad huh?
 
  
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creekbend

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Does anyone remember when buying a watermelon, the seller would "Plug" the melon for you before buying? I remember when this was the normal practice at not only roadside stands but grocery stores also.
 
  
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creekbend

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'Bout this time every year my family would pick apples by the bushel, then core and peel by the bushel, then pops would get our huge ( I mean HUGE ) copper kettle set and the fire going, the it was apple butter and apple sauce makin' time...can't tell you how many quart mason jars we made ! That was in the hills of West Virginia back in the day !
Your post brought back memories. I was raised in East Tennessee and I can remember stirring the Apple Butter and Peach Butter with a "Stirrer" to prevent the Peach or Apple butter from sticking. The "Stirrer" was L shaped with a brace. The Apple or Peach butter that is sold in stores nowadays can't even come close to the "REAL" kind that we used to make. I have two Brothers still living in East Tennessee and they both still send me some of the olde fashioned made kind. My youngest Brother's in-laws still make Apple Butter the old fashion way each year. My other Brother sends me 12 quart jars every year that the Church makes. There is nothing better than home made Peach Butter or Apple Butter on a real homemade biscuit. Thanks for bringing back memories.
 

2LaneCruzer

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My brother and went to school in SW Missouri in the mid 40's; we walked 3/4 of a mile to and from the bus stop every day. In the Fall, we used to stop and pick our lunch buckets full of possum grapes and take them home, where Mom used them to make some of the best jelly you ever ate. We also picked up black walnuts and sacked them up for my Grandpaw who paid us $1.00 per gunny sack full. He would pour them out on his driveway and after they had been run over a few times, the green hulls were mashed off and they could be retrieved and stored. Winter was hard there; we lived at the bottom of a steep hill and we would get snowed in for days at a time, until the neighbor would break open the road with his tractor. No TV in those days; no hot water and we heated with a pot belly stove. Mom cooked on a kerosene stove. I remember Dad killing and dressing rabbits in the Winterand hanging them on the screened in back porch, where they immediately froze and stayed frozen for weeks. Ah, those were the days.
 

Biggreenavalanche

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Creekbend, I agree with you whole heartedly ! Our "stirrer" Was a wooden paddle... By the end of the day we all smelled like a combo of smoke, apples, cinnamon with an overtone of sweat, lol

Good stuff

Rich
 
 
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