Ecoboost question for DP

  
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handirifle

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OK thanks for all the goodies on the 3.5. I do seem to remember that most of the injection events were at or after TDC, thus killing the knock causing pre-detonation normally caused by high compression ratio. That would also add more torque to the engines power band.

Ford's had a few years and this engine has proven very reliable, from what I have read. Good for them. They've had a history of poor engines (diesel) for a long time, the current 6.7L not included, and it's good to see an American car company kick but on power and fuel efficiency over the imports. Now, if the EB engines will last 200-300,000 miles, then it's a no brainer. I am seeing quite a number of them for sale after exceeding 100,000 though, so that is a concern.

Do the 4 cyl Ecoboosts work the same way?

One poster asked about high fuel rail pressures, and yes, they do run high enough to overpower cylinder pressure (diesel, I do not know about the EB, but I assume it does as well). That's why diesel fuel rail pressures will run as high as 26K. The high pressure also atomizes fuel better, which means more efficiency.

I assume the additional fuel events, are burned from the existing cylinder heat, and not from an additional spark event?
 
  
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handirifle

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1) Definitely more efficient, although some of the supercharger advances have probably closed this gap. When you don't need the boost, the turbo has almost no losses in the system while the supercharger always saps some energy.

2) The combustion is partially dependent on the atomization of the fuel as it expands to a lower pressure. I'm not really sure if it would be possible to ignite the fuel without a large surface area but it certainly would be less likely to ignite in liquid form than when it sprays.

Since I do not know how the EB fuel system works, it COULD operate at lower pressures, like the older diesels did, and use an outside source to force the fuel into the cylinder. The older diesels used high pressure oil to actually push a small piston inside the injector, and THAT created the ultra high pressure needed to force fuel into the cylinder, and atomize it enough for efficient combustion.
Personally, I doubt they would go backwards in technology, but who knows.

Gasoline is much harder to ignite, if at all, in liquid form. I have watched demonstrations, on film, of someone putting out a match in liquid gasoline. They moved very fast, but it worked. It's the VAPORS of gasoline, that ignite. That's one reason gas cars never needed an additional shot of fuel in the exhaust to ignite unburned gasses, like diesels do, such as in the CAT convertors or DPF diesel particulate filter. The DPF uses a urea based fuel.

Gas engines use exhaust heat to preheat the catalytic converter, and that heat vaporizes and burns the raw gas in the exhaust system.
 

CJONE

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Just a little tidbit on how good a computer controlled turbo engine can work. Look up Larry Larson on youtube and check out his 5 second street car [s-10] This truck will drive over 1000 miles to get to the different races without a support truck on pump fuel. So it is street driven. CJ
 

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I personally have nothing against turbos even though they aren't my thing. What I do find strange was an article a couple of weeks ago that said Ford was pumping V8 type sound throu the speakers of their perfomance turbo vehicles. Very odd.
 

jejeosborne

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I personally have nothing against turbos even though they aren't my thing. What I do find strange was an article a couple of weeks ago that said Ford was pumping V8 type sound throu the speakers of their perfomance turbo vehicles. Very odd.

Ford isn't the only manufacturer to do this. They also do it on the mustang.
 

xring100

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Didn't realize the DI reduced detonation. I guess it makes sense, the fuel cannot PRE DETONATE if it's not in there until time for spark.

I believe You also get a cooling effect from the fuel being introduced at high pressure in the DI gas engines. The rapid expansion causes it to cool.
 
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sd455dan

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Just a little tidbit on how good a computer controlled turbo engine can work. Look up Larry Larson on youtube and check out his 5 second street car [s-10] This truck will drive over 1000 miles to get to the different races without a support truck on pump fuel. So it is street driven. CJ

That's impressive -reminds me of a 63 Pontiac Lemans Built by Nelson racing back a few years For a street driven car this thing was crazy fast

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aa63hH55cfE
 

firemanmike69

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Since I do not know how the EB fuel system works, it COULD operate at lower pressures, like the older diesels did, and use an outside source to force the fuel into the cylinder. The older diesels used high pressure oil to actually push a small piston inside the injector, and THAT created the ultra high pressure needed to force fuel into the cylinder, and atomize it enough for efficient combustion. Personally, I doubt they would go backwards in technology, but who knows..
Some diesels used this technology,invented by cat also used by international called a HEUI injector, others used a high pressure inline or rotary injection pump to develop the pressure and timing needed back in those days the injection pressures were much lower than they are today. The reason this system was abandoned was due to not being able to meet tighter restrictions on particulate emissions.
Gasoline is much harder to ignite, if at all, in liquid form. I have watched demonstrations, on film, of someone putting out a match in liquid gasoline. They moved very fast, but it worked. It's the VAPORS of gasoline, that ignite. That's one reason gas cars never needed an additional shot of fuel in the exhaust to ignite unburned gasses, like diesels do, such as in the CAT convertors or DPF diesel particulate filter. The DPF uses a urea based fuel. Gas engines use exhaust heat to preheat the catalytic converter, and that heat vaporizes and burns the raw gas in the exhaust system.
The function of the DPF is to trap particulate matter in the exhaust something gas engines do not have. Occasionally the DPF gets too full if particulate matter and had to convert the particulate matter to ash by burning it or "regen" . The DEF is used to reduce NOx emissions from the latest round of emissions engines
 
 
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