Hot hot hot

Jchonline

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Feb 19, 2018
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Red Feather Lakes, CO
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Kubota M62, M7060, X1100C
Colorado Front range (East of divide) is looking really green. We have had a ton of spring rain. However hot hot right now.
 

Jchonline

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2018
Messages
1,864
Location
Red Feather Lakes, CO
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Kubota M62, M7060, X1100C
Climate change - it's not just an increase in temperature measured at various places. More important to humans - Everybody is starting to get someone else's weather pattern, as you noted. Wetter, dryer, hotter, whatever, weather patterns are moving around where they aren't expected. The example that first comes to mind is that Britain is rather far north but has a mild climate provided by circulation in the Atlantic that brings warm water up from the tropics. That circulation is slowing. I expect they will see some changes.

And we in California re getting slammed by drought. One theory is that the previous century was much wetter than the long term normal so that is what we expected to continue. But now the local climate is reverting back toward average - in addition to the global changes. We apparently can expect frequent massive fires, as the historic record indicates that was normal, pre-settlement.

It makes sense extreme fire behavior will be the norm when the forest is allowed to grow for decades unchecked. High temps, lack of humidity (and recovery in the AM), wind, and poor forest management(ie lots of available fuels) are the keys to extreme fire behavior. We cannot directly control the first 3...but we can control the last one.

This last fall we had some of our place burn (about 3 of 47 acres). It burned in the few places we had yet to do mitigation (on a steep ridge (lodgepole pine stand) and below it to the east (wind blew) in a stand of windthrow and down/dying firs. We have almost 35 acres fully mitigated...none of it crowned. It really does work. That said the only reason our place caught on fire was due to extremely poor management by USFS on their land to the west of us. It was about 60% beetle kill for over a decade. Never mitigated, never thinned. That is what caused the extreme fire behavior and caught our land on fire. Sure you could say they dont have the resources...but I would argue if they dont have the means to manage it, they should never own it in the first place. In the end we are of course thankful to only have a few acres to restore. It could have been much worse, no thanks to the USFS.

Now to sober everyone up that doesnt live in these areas with extreme fire behavior...I watched 1000 ft fire columns push OVER the highest part of the rocky mountain range around Estes Park CO. This is above the alpine line where it is just dirt and rock. No trees to burn for half to 1 mile over those peak saddles. The fire blew over it like it was a rock. Anytime a fire can go through one of the most significant natural barriers know to man....it is extreme. It reminded me of a tsunami but made with fire instead of water. Sobering stuff.
 
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California

Super Star Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2004
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11,764
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Sonoma County
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Yanmar YM240, and now just one YM186D
The officials in Kali. Can't get their act together
WTF? You sound consumed by jealousy! :ROFLMAO:

You live inside the Loon News bubble?

An example of what they'll never tell you:


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(source)

What's your source for your declaration?

Lets get back to reality. We were talking about drought and the chemical fire.
 

Diggin It

Super Member
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Aug 12, 2018
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Three Posts A Day. Or less.
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LS MT125 TLBM
I'm crying for rain. Just seeded 20k+ft/2 'cause it said rain for 5, maybe 6 days.. I'ts been exactly one all week... 🤦
They called for 4-5 days of scattered rain chances. I laid grass seed and covered it with grass clippings to keep the birds off it.

I got the 4-5 days of rain alright ... in about 30 minutes. So much for the cover and the seed.
 
 
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