Learn Me About JD 5E Series

   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #21  
Well, I did it. It's a 2017 5055e with about 150 hrs. It seems really clean and lightly used. I'll have to get used to running a loader from inside of a cab, but brush hogging and snow removal will be really nice. It is the global loader attachment. It has a bucket and a bale spear. I have to decide whether to get a set of forks or an adapter to use my old set.

I save a bunch of sales tax having it delivered at home, but it's going to be next week. Patience is tough once I've made a decision.
Congrats. I priced out a 2wd 5045E tractor, could be a purchase in the new future.

Here is a 5055E service video, shows grease points too.

 
   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #22  
The best way to describe the 5E units is that they not "cut back" from anything, they are simply the continuation of the original 5000 series line (5x00, 5x10, 5x20, and has both sides of the 5x10->5x03 and 5x20->5x25 split). The chassis, wheelbase, and nearly all of the engines and transmissions are the same. The 5M was a new chassis with a different frame arrangement and a noticeably longer wheelbase, the 5R was yet another new chassis but with a wheelbase in between the 5E and 5M. The 5M and 5R are much fancier than anything previously offered in the 5000 series line, so a better way to think about this is that those models added a bunch of features that weren't in previous tractors while the 5E line didn't add as much.
Mo1 seems to have a better grasp on what a 5E is than most on the internet. First "E" doesn't stand for "economy" in the JD lineup of tractors. Nowhere has JD (I'm not talking about some stupid JD salesman working at any given dealership who's subscribed to the "E for economy" narrative found on internets) ever made the claim that they put an E in their models name to stand for economy. This was invented by people on forums like this speaking on the internet claiming E for economy. With that said we do understand that the E series in the JD lineup signifies more of their base/entry level models that give you fewer frills for fewer dollars. Hey maybe E stands for entry level machine.?.?.? Or maybe E just precedes M, which precedes R, like D precedes E, and the older D models were more entry level than the E's. Or maybe E does stand for economy, and M stands for middle tractor, and R for rich people tractor.?.?

But really the 5E doesn't need to be viewed as an entry level machine compared to an M or R. These are different class machines. The 5E gives you most of the niceties and comforts to get the job done minus fender mounted 3PH controls and maybe a buddy seat or something. Probably no cab suspension, and the rearview camera mirror, HUD, and heated/vented/massaging seats found in your C8 Corvette are missing, but you get heat, A/C, radio, etc, and in 23 they allow for a premium cab option.

What I'm getting at is that the main value you're getting in a 5M over a 5E is the M is a larger, and more capable machine. Sure the 5M and especially the 5R will give you an amenity or 2 that the 5E neglects, but overall a cabbed 5E gives you everything to working in a comfortable, cool, (or warm) relatively quite, flat, spacious environment, while you jam to your music or listen to your favorite podcast, with you seat and steeringwheel adjusted to your desired positions. People who claim that, "a Kubota M60 series is a premium tractor, and a JD 5E is an economy tractor, and hence they shouldn't be compared. And to find a JD that's actually comparable to a M60 series tractor you have to step up to a 5M or even a 5R. But that's a bad comparison because of the cost difference" are either stupid, lying, or ignorant. More than any other tractor on this planet a M60 series is trying to compete with, and out do a 5E series, and vica versa. It's just like Silverado 1500 vs. F150. For example when you look at a 5075E vs M7060 everything other than their overall weights are extremely close between the two. Their wheelbases, tires, transmissions, features and amenities, options, 3PH/FEL capabilities, MSRP's are very comparable and close to one another. A 5075M is rated to lift noticeably more weight, noticeably higher at the FEL, and 1,400-2,500 lbs (depending on what 5M 3PH option you choose) at the 3PH than either a 5075E or M7060. A 75M has about a 8" longer wheelbase than a M60 and 10" longer than a 5E 3 cylinder. A 5075M weights a ton more than a M7060 or 5075E. (literally it's rated at 2,200-2,300 lbs more than a M7060 and 1,600-1,700 lbs more than a 5075E when comparing the same operator station configuration) The 5M's most base transmission is better than a M7060 or 5075E's best transmission options. It's tire options go much larger than the 7060 or 75E as does it's fuel capacity. Just the physical size of a 5M is noticeably bigger than either a M7060 or 5075E, so no a 5075M is not a M7060's true competitor, which a 5075E is. It's the same thing with a MF 4707. These dealers on YT want to always compare machines from their brands to other brands at obvious disadvantages and not apple to apple comparisons. MF dealers like to compare a 5075E or M7060 to a 4707. Not necessarily intended competitors. A 2607H is more then intended competitor for the M7060/5075E. A 4707 is a noticeably larger tractor than a M7060 or 5075E, but when I tell them to compare a 4707 to a 5075M they don't want to do that because a 4707 falls inbetween a 5075E and 5075M in terms of size, capabilities, amenities, price, and a transmission option on a 5E's level. They just respond, "well I'm basing this comparison off the price," and I respond with, not a MSRP, but possibly any given dealers markup price." They are all competitors in the sense that they are all AG/utility based tractors, in the 75 HP range. Still there are levels to this. For example you can get a F150 with similar HP to a F350, but when you look at both trucks work specs the F350 blows the F150 out the water in payload and towing ratings. But it should as it's a noticeably larger, and more expensive machine. Still a larger and more capable/expensive machine isn't always desirable. In some cases you want a smaller, more nimble, easier to deal with tractor. Then there are times you wish you had a larger, more capable, heavier tractor to manage more work, more effectively, efficiently, and safely. A 5E, M60, 2600H fill a much more traditional role than the 5M, 4700 series from MF, etc. The 5M and 4700 series are sort of in a class by themselves that JD and MF created, even though traditionally speaking tractors in their HP range could be in their size range as well. Still the 5E/M60/2600H fill the roles that machines from the past like a JD 2240 or 2155 filled, or a Ford Powermaster 861D, 3910, 3930, 4630, 2000/3000/4000, 2600/3600, etc, or a MF 165, 245, 255, 270, 290, etc, or a International 484/584, or a CIH 485/585/685, etc, etc, filled. They are small enough to be easy to use for most things without being inconvenient, but large enough and powerful enough to be capable of pulling a hat off your head unlike maybe a 8N or Farmall Cub. These tractors work well at everything from bush hogging, to being a plow horse for someone who's primary occupation isn't farming, to getting you in and out the woods to cut firewood, to being a capable loader machine, to grass farming, to working with your livestock, to being not too cumbersome to needing a truck requiring a CDL to transport. These machines fill a very old and important niche. Your typical compact tractor owner is looking to fill a different role than someone who considers these machines. You're not going to want to use a compact tractor to manage a large round baler, a heavy disc mower. You're probably also not going to want to use a compact tractor to pull an 8' disk to plow up food plots in a wet swamp, or maybe use to farm some small acreage as a secondary farming, hobby type job. Then there are roles that a compact or larger utility or row crop machines fill better than a 50-80 HP, 2-2.5 ton Ag style utility tractor fills.
 
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   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series
  • Thread Starter
#23  
I've had the 5055E for about nine months now. I really like it so far. Of course, a cab heat/AC, and radio is always an improvement. We've had a pretty snowy winter, so it was nice to have.

The back end is a bit light for the heavy duty loader. If I keep the box blade on the back, it helps quite a bit. I also want to move the tires out a bit.

I've been fixing up the 5105 as well. It's usable now, but I still need a hood.

20230226_123617.jpg
 
   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #24  
Mo1 seems to have a better grasp on what a 5E is than most on the internet. First "E" doesn't stand for "economy" in the JD lineup of tractors. Nowhere has JD (I'm not talking about some stupid JD salesman working at any given dealership who's subscribed to the "E for economy" narrative found on internets) ever made the claim that they put an E in their models name to stand for economy. This was invented by people on forums like this speaking on the internet claiming E for economy. With that said we do understand that the E series in the JD lineup signifies more of their base/entry level models that give you fewer frills for fewer dollars. Hey maybe E stands for entry level machine.?.?.? Or maybe E just precedes M, which precedes R, like D precedes E, and the older D models were more entry level than the E's. Or maybe E does stand for economy, and M stands for middle tractor, and R for rich people tractor.?.?

But really the 5E doesn't need to be viewed as an entry level machine compared to an M or R. These are different class machines. The 5E gives you most of the niceties and comforts to get the job done minus fender mounted 3PH controls and maybe a buddy seat or something. Probably no cab suspension, and the rearview camera mirror, HUD, and heated/vented/massaging seats found in your C8 Corvette are missing, but you get heat, A/C, radio, etc, and in 23 they allow for a premium cab option.

What I'm getting at is that the main value you're getting in a 5M over a 5E is the M is a larger, and more capable machine. Sure the 5M and especially the 5R will give you an amenity or 2 that the 5E neglects, but overall a cabbed 5E gives you everything to working in a comfortable, cool, (or warm) relatively quite, flat, spacious environment, while you jam to your music or listen to your favorite podcast, with you seat and steeringwheel adjusted to your desired positions. People who claim that, "a Kubota M60 series is a premium tractor, and a JD 5E is an economy tractor, and hence they shouldn't be compared, and that to find a JD that's actually comparable to a M60 series tractor you have to step up to a 5M or even a 5R, but that's a bad comparison because of the cost difference" and either stupid, lying, or ignorant. More than any other tractor on this planet a M60 series is trying to compete and out do a 5E series, and vica versa. It's just like Silverado 1500 vs. F150. For example when you look at a 5075E vs M7060 everything other than their overall weights are extremely close between the two. Their wheelbases, tires, transmissions, features and amenities, options, 3PH/FEL capabilities, MSRP's are very comparable and close to one another. A 5075M is rated to lift noticeably more weight, noticeably higher at the FEL, and 1,400-2,500 lbs (depending on what 5M 3PH option you choose) at the 3PH than either a 5075E or M7060. A 75M has about a 8" longer wheelbase than a M60 and 10" longer than a 5E 3 cylinder. A 5075M weights a ton more than a M7060 or 5075E. (literally it's rated at 2,200-2,300 lbs more than a M7060 and 1,600-1,700 lbs more than a 5075E when comparing the same operator station configuration) The 5M's most base transmission is better than a M7060 or 5075E's best transmission options. It's tire options go much larger than the 7060 or 75E as does it's fuel capacity. Just the physical size of a 5M is noticeably bigger than either a M7060 or 5075E, so no a 5075M is not a M7060's true competitor, which a 5075E is. It's the same thing with a MF 4707. These dealers on YT want to always compare machines from their brands to other brands at obvious disadvantages and not apple to apple comparisons. MF dealers like to compare a 5075E or M7060 to a 4707. Not necessarily intended competitors. A 2607H is more then intended competitor for the M7060/5075E. A 4707 is a noticeably larger tractor than a M7060 or 5075E, but when I tell them to compare a 4707 to a 5075M they don't want to do that because a 4707 falls inbetween a 5075E and 5075M in terms of size, capabilities, amenities, price, and a transmission option on a 5E's level. They just respond, "well I'm basing this comparison off the price," and I respond with, not a MSRP, but possibly any given dealers markup price." They are all competitors in the sense that they are all AG/utility based tractors, in the 75 HP range. Still there are levels to this. For example you can get a F150 with similar HP to a F350, but when you look at both trucks work specs the F350 blows the F150 out the water in payload and towing ratings. But it should as it's a noticeably larger, and more expensive machine. Still a larger and more capable/expensive machine isn't always desirable. In some cases you want a smaller, more nimble, easier to deal with tractor. Then there are times you wish you had a larger, more capable, heavier tractor to manage more work, more effectively, efficiently, and safely. A 5E, M60, 2600H fill a much more traditional role than the 5M, 4700 series from MF, etc. The 5M and 4700 series are sort of in a class by themselves that JD and MF created, even though traditionally speaking tractors in their HP range could be in their size range as well. Still the 5E/M60/2600H fill the roles that machines from the past like a JD 2240 or 2155 filled, or a Ford Powermaster 861D, 3910, 3930, 4630, 2000/3000/4000, 2600/3600, etc, or a MF 165, 245, 255, 270, 290, etc, or a International 484/584, or a CIH 485/585/685, etc, etc, filled. They are small enough to be easy to use for most things without being inconvenient, but large enough and powerful enough to be capable of pulling a hat off your head unlike maybe a 8N or Farmall Cub. These tractors work well at everything from bush hogging, to being a plow horse for someone who's primary occupation isn't farming, to getting you in and out the woods to cut firewood, to being a capable loader machine, to grass farming, to working with your livestock, to being not too cumbersome to needing a truck requiring a CDL to transport. These machines fill a very old and important niche. Your typical compact tractor owner is looking to fill a different role than someone who considers these machines. You're not going to want to use a compact tractor to manage a large round baler, a heavy disc mower. You're probably also not going to want to use a compact tractor to pull an 8' disk to plow up food plots in a wet swamp, or maybe use to farm some small acreage as a secondary farming, hobby type job. Then there are roles that a compact or larger utility or row crop machines fill better than a 50-80 HP, 2-2.5 ton Ag style utility tractor fills.
I didn't mean to start such a controversy calling the E series the economy model of John Deere's lineup months ago, I happen to own one and like it, and of course JD isn't going to say anything in their lineup is economy, that word doesn't come from them, it comes from a lot of owners and operators of said tractors, let the buyer/ operator figure it out, go test the E and the M and R and see what you think, but this much is for sure it is the bottom tier of JD's lineup, and as I stated in the earlier post not everyone wants or needs or maybe can even afford a 100k tractor so there is the E= economy, or maybe it could be the LE= less expensive.
 
   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #25  
Everyone should know that there are 2 different frames on the 5E tractors. The 5075 and below are shorter and the 5090 and up are longer. The 5090/5100E are the same as the 5100M. I know my tractor was made in Augusta and I believe the lower numbers are made in India, I think.
 
   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #26  
I didn't mean to start such a controversy calling the E series the economy model of John Deere's lineup months ago, I happen to own one and like it, and of course JD isn't going to say anything in their lineup is economy, that word doesn't come from them, it comes from a lot of owners and operators of said tractors, let the buyer/ operator figure it out, go test the E and the M and R and see what you think, but this much is for sure it is the bottom tier of JD's lineup, and as I stated in the earlier post not everyone wants or needs or maybe can even afford a 100k tractor so there is the E= economy, or maybe it could be the LE= less expensive.
You didn't. You're just one in a long list of people own claim that E stands for economy. No one claims that their F150 XL is their economy model truck. It's their base model truck is the common description. Economy didn't become the popular way to describe a more basic optioned machine until JD started putting E as a sign of more entry level for any given size class of tractor. Now people literally feel that when JD was naming their tractors that they meant E for economy. It's almost always the case that tractor manufacturers give their more basic machines earlier letters in the alphabet. Farmall 75A vs Farmall 75C for example. Does the B in a Kubota B01 series stand for base model? No one claims that even though it's their entry level compact tractor.

You're missing my point. A 3 cylinder 5E is not a competitor to a 5M. It's not apples to apples, but from just a features and amenities level it's pretty close. When people say 4066R vs 5065E or 5075E I'm like what are you looking for in a tractor? A 5E is a large, more capable tractor with 95% of the niceties a 4R has. Other than a fender mounted 3PH remote and a buddy seat what convenience does a 4R have that a 5E doesn't? Not all E models and all R models are created the same. A 6R or 8R are noticeably more hooked up machines than a 3R or 4R as is a 3E less optioned than a 5E or 6E. A 5E isn't as basic as people make is out to be. Don't believe me then go look at a base MF, or Mahindra, etc. Especially a 2023 5E which still offers the traditional cab it always has as well as a premium cab option. So no a 5M or 5R isn't just a nicer tractor in the same class as a 5E, they are noticeably larger and more capable machines. It's like comparing a 1/2 ton truck to a 3/4 ton truck. Not a good comparison. If they are tractors in the same size class, just the M and R machine are much nicer featured tractors then you're acting like JD is a Ferrari or something with a 5E sized tractor MSRP'ing for 6 figures. I was talking with a guy with a 5115R and his tractor with a loader, filled rear tires, and wheel weights was almost 13K lbs. That's 5010/5020/6030 type weight. A 5E with that setup isn't lightweight by any means, but is still several thousand lbs less with a much smaller footprint. A 5R is capable of performing noticeably more work than a 5E. A 3E isn't as nice as a 3R, but can do about the same work and the size difference between the 2 isn't nearly as great as it is between a 3 cylinder 5E and a 5M or 5R. A 4 cylinder 5E might be a better comparison size wise, but a 3 cylinder 5E performs the role of being the traditional, volume selling, Ag based utility tractor for JD. And yes, most people don't want to go broke buying a small Ag based/utility tractor. Still no one says, "you shouldn't consider a M7060, when a M5 series is nicer and a M7060 is Kubota's economy Ag/utility machine." They're a different class machine. You might compare a M7060 to a M4 model (I believe it's called a M4-71 or something) because it's basically just a M7060 that's gotten new features and amenities, but based on the same frame. JD's answer to this is the 5E with the premium cab setup which gives you a bunch of new niceties. Again not as economy as people pretend it is. Hell a lot of base machines in the same size class as a 5E don't offer powershuttles, 12 F/R gears, a wet clutch, convenient PTO switch, fender mounted throttle, or 540E PTO even in 2023. Like mo1 said the 3 cylinder 5E is just the evolution of the 5000/5010/5020 series of tractors which post-date your 2x40, 2x50, 2x55 series machines, and yes some of those models will size up to being larger than a 3 cylinder 5E like a 2755 or 2955 for example, but a 2155 did the job back in the 80's and early 90's that a 3 cylinder 5E performs today.

I did buy, and do operate a 2018 5075E for over 5 years now. A 5E got a lot nicer in 2015, and then again in 2018. In 2023 they took another leap up in niceties. Just talking about how nice, and comfortable a machine is, a 2010 5E is very outclassed by a 2020 5E. Hell a 2018 5E is noticeably more comfortable than a 2017 5E.(talking OSS, 3 cylinder machines) Bigger seat, way more room, much flatter floor, foot throttle moved out from under the brake pedal, the FEL control is moved several inch father away from your leg, and the hand throttle is an awesome and unexpectedly so upgrade.
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   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #27  
Everyone should know that there are 2 different frames on the 5E tractors. The 5075 and below are shorter and the 5090 and up are longer. The 5090/5100E are the same as the 5100M. I know my tractor was made in Augusta and I believe the lower numbers are made in India, I think.
Both machines components are made in India, and they are both assembled in Grovetown, GA which Grovetown is just part of the greater Augusta area.
 
   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #28  
Seems everyone is always comparing the differences between the E and the M in the Deere 5 series which is for the most part weight, most of which comes from a heavier rear end in the M. I have a 5115m with a 540R loader , very well built heavy duty tractor that I’ve been happy with. I don’t see many comparisons between the 3cyl and 4cyl in the 5E series.
Last fall I was in the market for a OOS 4wd loader tractor in the 70-80 hp range . I was looking for a late model very low houred 5075E . Spent a lot of time searching tractor house/ marketbook and expanded my search to include 5085E/5090E . I noticed a lot of upgrades that came with the jump from 5075E to the 5085/5090E for not much more money on the low houred used market.
Upgrades I found that came standard with the jump from 3cyl to 4cyl 5E’s; much bigger 4.5L intercooled engine vs 2.9L non intercooled in the 5075E, Much heavier front axle (basically same front axle as my 5115m) , two sets of SCV’ s standard (only one set standard on 5075E) , about 25% more hydraulic flow standard, 12x12 power reverser wet clutch transmission standard, bigger front and rear tires standard, larger fuel capacity standard, longer wheelbase with the 4cyl yet a foot tighter turning radius than the 3cyl, heavier capacity drawbar standard and higher output alternator standard.
All these upgrades along with 10 more Hp for very little difference in price and I started to concentrate on finding a 5085/5090E . Ended up finding a 2018 5085E with 540m loader and 73” HD bucket, only 14 hrs on it. For my needs it was the right choice.
 

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   / Learn Me About JD 5E Series #29  
Mo1 seems to have a better grasp on what a 5E is than most on the internet. First "E" doesn't stand for "economy" in the JD lineup of tractors. Nowhere has JD (I'm not talking about some stupid JD salesman working at any given dealership who's subscribed to the "E for economy" narrative found on internets) ever made the claim that they put an E in their models name to stand for economy. This was invented by people on forums like this speaking on the internet claiming E for economy. With that said we do understand that the E series in the JD lineup signifies more of their base/entry level models that give you fewer frills for fewer dollars. Hey maybe E stands for entry level machine.?.?.? Or maybe E just precedes M, which precedes R, like D precedes E, and the older D models were more entry level than the E's. Or maybe E does stand for economy, and M stands for middle tractor, and R for rich people tractor.?.?

But really the 5E doesn't need to be viewed as an entry level machine compared to an M or R. These are different class machines. The 5E gives you most of the niceties and comforts to get the job done minus fender mounted 3PH controls and maybe a buddy seat or something. Probably no cab suspension, and the rearview camera mirror, HUD, and heated/vented/massaging seats found in your C8 Corvette are missing, but you get heat, A/C, radio, etc, and in 23 they allow for a premium cab option.

Deere's trim level letters are noted by Deere to be that the earlier the letter in the alphabet, the simpler the tractor, and the later the letter in the alphabet, the more deluxe. "E" comes before "M" so an "E" tractor in the same series is going to be more basic than the "M" model. There is really no great comparator to the 3 cylinder 5E anywhere else in Deere's lineup. The 3 cylinder 5E uses a noticeably shorter wheelbase than the 4 cylinder 5E but is also a full-sized machine with only geared transmissions and a planetary MFWD unlike the 4 series compacts. The 4 cylinder 5E would be much better comparator to the 5M as they are basically the same size and with the exception of the 5075M (which uses the same engine as the 5075E), use the same engine.

The cabbed 5Es have all offered buddy seats since MY18 if I remember correctly.

The 5Ds were based on a different chassis and used a different transmission than any 5E did. They were basically just the 2WD 5105 and 5205 with the "new" naming scheme. They were an India-market tractor that Deere decided to briefly bring here.


Seems everyone is always comparing the differences between the E and the M in the Deere 5 series which is for the most part weight, most of which comes from a heavier rear end in the M. I have a 5115m with a 540R loader , very well built heavy duty tractor that I’ve been happy with. I don’t see many comparisons between the 3cyl and 4cyl in the 5E series.
Last fall I was in the market for a OOS 4wd loader tractor in the 70-80 hp range . I was looking for a late model very low houred 5075E . Spent a lot of time searching tractor house/ marketbook and expanded my search to include 5085E/5090E . I noticed a lot of upgrades that came with the jump from 5075E to the 5085/5090E for not much more money on the low houred used market.
Upgrades I found that came standard with the jump from 3cyl to 4cyl 5E’s; much bigger 4.5L intercooled engine vs 2.9L non intercooled in the 5075E, Much heavier front axle (basically same front axle as my 5115m) , two sets of SCV’ s standard (only one set standard on 5075E) , about 25% more hydraulic flow standard, 12x12 power reverser wet clutch transmission standard, bigger front and rear tires standard, larger fuel capacity standard, longer wheelbase with the 4cyl yet a foot tighter turning radius than the 3cyl, heavier capacity drawbar standard and higher output alternator standard.
All these upgrades along with 10 more Hp for very little difference in price and I started to concentrate on finding a 5085/5090E . Ended up finding a 2018 5085E with 540m loader and 73” HD bucket, only 14 hrs on it. For my needs it was the right choice.

For some reason people compare the 5M to the 3 cylinder 5E, which makes little sense as the 3 cylinder 5E is made on a noticeably smaller chassis. I suspect it comes from the 5075M, which is the 5075E's 3029H turbocharged and aftercooled engine in the 5M chassis in order to give Deere an option in that chassis size but not require DEF. The 4 cylinder 5E has the same wheelbase as the 5M and is really a better comparator for all other purposes.

All of the common-rail engines Deere makes are turbocharged and at least aftercooled, including the 2.9. I believe the larger sequential turbocharged units are also intercooled, but those are in far larger tractors than a 5 series, which are all single turbocharger. Deere quit making non-aftercooled turbocharged diesels when they quit making mechanically-injected engines.

The 75 HP units from all makers regardless of chassis size are really popular since they are the largest ones that don't require DEF. It seems that based on what I see on dealer lots and showing up as lease returns that DEF made anything larger than 75 HP but under about 100-110 HP pretty unappealing. The 85 and 90 HP machines are the smallest ones that require DEF and most who would have gotten one either went with a 75 HP machine or got a machine that was noticeably larger (usually 120+ HP) if they needed more than 75 HP and knew they'd have to muck with DEF. I suspect this is why the 5085E/5090E are not that much more on the used market than a 5075E and why few discuss a 3 cylinder vs. 4 cylinder 5E. Around here, the jump is from a 5075E to a 6120M or 6130M for the most part.

The current MY2023 3 cylinder 5Es are available with optional tires the same size as the 4 cylinder 5Es, although putting the 11.2-24 or 12.4-24 fronts on really widens up the turning radius compared to the 9.5-24s as the steering stops have to be set pretty far out to prevent rubbing against the side cowling. If you need a really maneuverable 3 cylinder 5E, the 2WD units will turn a whole lot tighter than any MFWD 5E (either 3 or 4 cylinder) and use the same front axle as the 2WD 5Ms.
 
 
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