Need advice on trailer purchase

   #11  

ProfJeff

Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2021
Messages
30
Location
Columbia SC
Tractor
GC1723E
I've towed lots of trailers over the years--cars, boats, motorcycles, utility. Longer trailers, within reason, usually tow better and handle the weight better. I would still go longer here but Nikerret asked the right question. It sounds like the trailer is about 1700# plus 3250# so very close to 5000#. Even though your vehicle probably says it has a max tow rating of 6000-6500 pounds, that means a truck with no options and nothing in it--not even your lunch. You are pushing it with that tow vehicle which weighs under 5000 pounds--so the trailer weighs more than the tow vehicle, meaning the trailer is in control. Anything in the bed or more than you in the cab is going to make it iffy--and you say you are helping her move so that could mean stuff in the bed of the truck. All of that weight adds up. 30 miles isn't too far but take it slowly. Watch your brakes. Maine has some hills and your trailer nearly outweighs your truck so going down a hill, the trailer can overpower your truck. I've burned through brakes twice in 55,000 miles on my 2002 F150 towing 3000-4500# even with trailer brakes, and I am sure its brakes are bigger than yours. Possible? Yes. Ideal? Bad news--no.
 
   #12  

4570Man

Super Star Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2015
Messages
14,133
Location
Crossville, TN
Tractor
Kubota M59, Kubota L3800, Grasshopper 428D, Topkick dump truck, 3500 dump truck, 10 ton trailer, more lighter trailers.
For a lot of people, the trailer is a one time investment. You will likely change vehicles before you change trailers. To me, it sounds like the 18’ 7k is the way to go. Get brakes on both axles, if at all possible.

Agreed. My 7k only has brakes on one axel which works good enough but it overheats it.
 
   #13  

Rock Crawler

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2017
Messages
1,999
Location
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Tractor
2018 Kubota B2650 TLB 280hrs, 2011 Craftsman Excellerator GT (680hrs), 2018 Husqvarna TS354XD, 2017 Husqvarna HU800AWD, 2019 Kawasaki Mule Pro DX (Yanmar)
I would go 22 foot deck, truck bed tool box across the front.

Look at Iron Bull if anyone carries them. I bought a fantastic 14K gross 22 foot Iron Bull equipment trailer with 8k lb rated drive over fenders and I'm in with love it.
 
   #14  

KennyG

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
3,530
Location
SW Michigan
Tractor
John Deere 2320
Definitely go bigger. You need room to position the load correctly. My tractor is a good bit smaller than yours and my 16' 7K trailer is barely adequate. I really want an 18 or 20 foot aluminum 7K trailer but haven't pulled the trigger yet.
 
   #15  

dodge man

Super Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2008
Messages
7,364
Location
West central Illinois
Tractor
JD 2025R
I think you will be fine with a 16 foot. Also realize you are at the limits of what you can tow with your truck, you will probably want/need a weight distribution hitch also.
 
   #16  

Bearsixty7

Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
532
Location
St. Paul TX
Tractor
LS MT240HE. JD LA145.
You should go 18-20', 7k rated, brakes on both axles. Nothing less.
 
   #17  

3Ts

Veteran Member
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
1,823
Location
Grapeland, Texas
Tractor
Case, Kubota, John Deere
I have a 16' 7K trailer to haul my Kubota which is about 2500#. Knowing what I know now, I'd have gone to an 18'. You definitely want brakes on both axles with your setup, if your trailer doesn't come that way, add them.

Check to see if the 2nd axle has the mounting flange for the brake backing plate. If so, it's just a matter of replacing the hubs and running a few wires.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#18  
OP
Emainiac

Emainiac

New member
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
13
Location
Southern coast of Maine
Tractor
Mahindra 1626 Shuttle
I called the dealer this morning and I can get a Big Tex 16' with a payload of 4300 lbs (6K total), brakes on all 4 wheels, slide in ramps for $2895.

My payload will average 3700 lbs. The length of tractor from front of loader to back of BB is just shy of 14'. While I don't want to cut myself short on future needs, my biggest concern is tow-ability based on some of the comments above.

A fully loaded trailer will weigh about 5500 lbs and my truck has a tow rating of 6800 lbs. I think I would rather sacrifice a little elbow room for lighter/easier haul. Going to an 18' add a couple hundred pounds and a few hundred dollars.

My feeling is that if I feel I need to upgrade at some point, I could sell this trailer for just about what it will cost me. Who knows, I may have a new truck by then.
 
   #19  

fried1765

Super Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2015
Messages
9,086
Location
Northeast & FL
Tractor
Kubota L48 TLB, Ford 1920 FEL, 8N Ford, Gravely 12 HP "Professional", 48" SCAG Liberty
For a lot of people, the trailer is a one time investment. You will likely change vehicles before you change trailers. To me, it sounds like the 18’ 7k is the way to go. Get brakes on both axles, if at all possible.
Best choice in my opinion, would be an 18 foot, 10,000 lb. GW trailer.
You may never load it to max weight with your Nissan, but you will likely not have your Nissan forever either.
No one that I know has EVER wished for a smaller trailer.
I don't like to buy the same implement twice!
I costs more money that way!

I have a 14K 20' trailer, and would really like it to be 22' or 24'
Storage space (inside) limited my length.
 
Last edited:
   #20  

nikerret

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2015
Messages
528
Location
Kansas
Tractor
Kubota BX25D-1
I called the dealer this morning and I can get a Big Tex 16' with a payload of 4300 lbs (6K total), brakes on all 4 wheels, slide in ramps for $2895.

A fully loaded trailer will weigh about 5500 lbs and my truck has a tow rating of 6800 lbs. I think I would rather sacrifice a little elbow room for lighter/easier haul. Going to an 18' add a couple hundred pounds and a few hundred dollars.

It’s easy to spend other people’s money, but I think this proves the opposite point.

You can upgrade two more feet (to a trailer that has much more usefulness) and 1k overall capacity, for a few hundred dollars.

Think of it this way:
For roughly 10% more money, you get over 14% more capability (Weight) and over 12% more space.

As far as your towing capacity, the anticipated payload is 3,700 lbs. Let‘s call it 4K, for easy math and the fact loads tend to grow, not shrink.
The 16’ trailer weighs around 1,700 lbs. and is rated at a GVWR (trailer and load) of 6k. You will be at around 95% of the trailer’s overall rated capability (5,700 of the 6,000). Towing 5,700 lbs is a bit less than 84% of your towing vehicle’s tow rating.

Now, let’s run the same numbers, but an 18’.
The 18’ trailer weighs around 2,000 lbs. and is rated at a GVWR (trailer and load) of 7k. You will be a bit under 86% of the trailer’s overall rated capability (6,000 of the 7,000). Towing 6,000 lbs is a bit more than 88% of your towing vehicle’s tow rating.

Everything at under 90% of rated capacity is a wide safety margin.

The difference between the way a 6k and 7k trailer is built is usually pretty drastic. Most 6k are built for smaller items that won’t move. The 7k will generally be built for heavier things with moving load (such as cars with a suspension sitting in the deck). Similarly, the build geometry of a 7k versus 10k is a big jump. Again, from 10k to 14k is a VERY large gap (I’m not talking about de-rated trailers, here). Once you get to trailers built around the 14k GVWR, you’re talking “heavy duty”, built for daily construction use. Yes, there are also manufacturers who only change the coupler and axles to go from a 5k trailer to a 10k trailer.

As far as resale. In my area, you’ll sell ten 7k trailers for every 6k. The 6k is just big enough to only haul small equipment and really small cars. The 7k opens so many doors, you can haul any “regular size” auto, plus, EVERYTHING that the 6k can do.
 
 
Top