Nipping Dog

   / Nipping Dog #1  

ToadHill

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Well about a year ago my daughter got me a Bassett hound puppy to replace my 10 year old bassett that died. He's generally a good dog but within the last couple of months he has taken to counter surfing now & then and when he gets something off the counter and you try to get it back from him he's begun to nip at whoever tries to get the item back. So far he hasn't broken the skin, but I'm sure it will happen if I can't break him of this habit.

This is my third Bassett and I've never had one who is this possessive, any one have any ideas how I can cure him of this.
 
   / Nipping Dog #2  

tallyho8

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My method is probably not reccomended by your local humane society but it has worked for me in the past.

First you have to establish complete dominance over the dog so that he will know for sure who is boss. One way I do this is to immediately act when he nips. I throw the dog on his back and sit on his chest (do not put all your weight on him, just enough to hold him down). I put my hands around his throat applying light pressure and use my arms to hold his front legs back from moving. At no time do I do anything to injure the dog but they will usually fight back violently trying to escape this position and I just restrain them completely holding them perfectly immobile. After a while the dog ceases to fight to escape and gives up, sorta like when the tv cowboy breaks a horse, and I just remain there for a few more minutes before I let him up. The dog will usually go sheepishly on his way and you will usually not have to repeat this procedure. ;)

If it's a large dog, you may want to keep his claws filed well so that you don't get scratched up when you start this encounter.

Don't try this with a dog that you are not able to physically restrain safely for your protection.
 
   / Nipping Dog #3  

jinjimbob

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I agree with tallyho, just not the throat thing.

You have to let the dog know who is the boss, he will actually like that too, he gets less worried about anything, like you are there to protect him.

When our German shepherd used to do that, or do anything very wrong like chase a cat, shout "NO!", I got her down on her side, held my hand over her eyes, she only struggles for a few seconds. After 30 seconds let her up and say good dog.

You have less than one and half seconds to correct your dog, otherwise it hasn't a clue why you are doing what you doing. You also have to do this every single time, yep, for 100 times in a row if that is what it takes. You don't bother one time, back to the beginning.
 
   / Nipping Dog #4  

DocHeb

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First you have to establish complete dominance over the dog so that he will know for sure who is boss. One way I do this is to immediately act when he nips. I throw the dog on his back and sit on his chest (do not put all your weight on him, just enough to hold him down). I put my hands around his throat applying light pressure and use my arms to hold his front legs back from moving. At no time do I do anything to injure the dog but they will usually fight back violently trying to escape this position and I just restrain them completely holding them perfectly immobile. After a while the dog ceases to fight to escape and gives up, sorta like when the tv cowboy breaks a horse, and I just remain there for a few more minutes before I let him up. The dog will usually go sheepishly on his way and you will usually not have to repeat this procedure. ;)Don't try this with a dog that you are not able to physically restrain safely for your protection.

This also works with teenagers.
 
   / Nipping Dog #5  

czechsonofagun

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Airedales are master's of counter surfing and there is way to deal with it. Just get some mouse traps, those old style with the spring and leave them on the counter. When he triggers one he will sure be avoiding that spot. I never had to do this, but there are people owned by an airedale who were force to do this.
 
   / Nipping Dog #6  

pennwalk

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Tally,

There is a dog training book that I like by the Monks of New Skete called How to be your dogs best friend. I think they call that move a wolf roll. It is essential that you be the boss or no one will be happy. It totally amazes me how screwed up some people let their dogs get. I wasn't thinking about anyone here but we have a family member who has totally ruined 2 trainable dogs.

Chris
 
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   / Nipping Dog #7  

pennwalk

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This also works with teenagers.

Yeah, but don't forget to growl and bare your teeth.:D:D:D

Chris
 
   / Nipping Dog #8  

davitk

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I like the "sitting on the dog" technique :D but fear it could be difficult to pull off, what happens if you lose the battle :eek: I have always trained my puppies from nipping by grabbing their muzzle tightly, shouting NO BITE! and squeezing until it hurts.
 
   / Nipping Dog #9  

rtimgray

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Sounds like good advice so far. Showing the dog who's boss immediately is probably the way to go.

I've always had an affection for Malamutes. We've had 4 over the course of several years. The first two disappeared during deer seasons (I assume they were shot by hunters), and my wife ran over another accidentally (that was very sad).

The most recent one came from a shelter in Illinois (all of them have come from shelters or pounds). I've noticed two common traits with all the malamute and malamute-mix dogs that we have had:

1. They talk to me (the kind of howl/whine/bark), usuallly when I get home or feed them, but sometimes just when they feel like it.
2. They like to nip and bite me. Seldom hard enough to hurt. They usually have either done this when I'm giving them affection, but sometimes they do it just to get my attention. I assume its a "love bite", so to speak.

Does anybody know of other types of dogs that share these traits, or other strange traits of dogs.
 
   / Nipping Dog #10  

Tig

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My dog once had a difference of opinion with me and I got bit. Didn't break the skin but it really hurt. This next part may seem odd but I had read it recently so I gave it a try. I told the dog to sit and stay! I then sat down in a chair looking over the dog and stared at her. Gave her the evil eye if you like. She would look at me and then look away quickly. After 20 mins I had her come over and sit next to me. I then spoke to her calmly. Typing this out almost makes me laugh because it sounds so silly but I have not had another problem with her.
 
 
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