Pennsylvania New Home Build Thread. An attempt.

   #1  

MGH PA

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Joined
Oct 25, 2010
Messages
232
Location
Northcentral, PA
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2005 Gravely 148Z 48" ZTR
Like the title says, I will attempt this. I was debating whether or not to do it, but I really enjoyed all of the time I scoured the builds posted on here in the past, so I figured I would try. Plus, I'm sure many of you can point out mistakes we're making along the way :)

This thread will not be updated daily, but I will do my best to provide updates throughout the process.

So, a quick back story:

My wife and I have two kids, we live about two miles from where we're building. We've outgrown our current home, and always wanted a little more land. It just so happens, my father was able to buy the farm the borders theirs a year and a half ago, and we subdivided and purchased 25 acres off of them from that parcel. It's typical northern PA topography of ridges, valleys, farmland, etc. The 25 acres I purchased is primarily timber (including the building site) which made from some major work getting the lot cleared. Additionally, the best access route for the property was across my parents existing farm due to minor elevation change, and sheer openness of it all. We're surrounded by and additional 200 acres between my parents old farm and new farm, so we will have plenty of privacy.

A look at our back yard:

site_summer.jpg

building lot.jpg

We're build a single story with a walkout basement. About 2900 sq.ft. We're doing ICF for the basement, R10 subslab (most likely Nudura or Creatherm panels), NuWool in the main walls and ceiling (R49 ceiling with raised heel trusses). Debating on whether to go Geo or variable speed ASHP at this point. We have no NG, and I don't want to deal with propane or oil.

firstfloor.jpgsecondfloor.jpg


elevations.jpg

The first job started back in March of 2018. We began initial clearing for the septic testing and driveway. We did everything with two guys, two saws, and a JD 990 :). Below is a few shots of the progress we made:

The building when we started:

road_build3.jpeg

The driveway is almost a 1/2 mile long, about 950ft of that needed cleared, the rest covers existing ag fields.

Dad cutting on the new road this summer. The bugs and humidity made this really fun.

road_build.jpegroad_build2.jpeg

We took a lot of timber out. This is just one pile of two of pole wood. Saw logs were taken and sold.

timber.jpeg

The building site as it stood this past fall:

site.jpeg

Once everything froze up a bit, we brought out the big guns, and had our driveway cut in:

driveway.jpgdozer.jpegdriveway2.jpeg

The excavator put in between 10-12" of shale, and only did a quick topcoat of 2b for the last 100ft to cut down on mud hitting the township road. We will finish the road once construction is all finished.

As of right now, the well is dug, the permits are issued, and we're just waiting on the bank. Hoping to break ground in mid May.
 
   #2  

coldsteelva

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Loudoun County, VA
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Massey GC1720 & Mitsu MT180D
Absolutely gorgeous scenery. I'm in the northern tip of VA where it meets MD and WV, so it looks just like home. I look forward to following this build. The amount of sweat equity that you have already put in is admirable. They certainly aren't making more land, so it's great that your family has been able to acquire so much.
 
   #5  

buckeyefarmer

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Jun 25, 2005
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MD
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Kubota L3940 L5030 MF205-4
Nice view. Cant wait to see the build pics.
 
   #6  

techman

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Mar 24, 2002
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N.E. PA
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BX22
For my opinion I would only consider geo on a new home. The most cost effective is to go horizontal trench which you have the land for. My own 2800 sq-ft home was a 500' trench, 5-6' deep, with 4 pipes in the trench. You possibly could trench it yourself, and put the pipes in. That would go a long way to lowering your cost. Given new construction, you will need to finish off a yard, so the trenching would have no real effect. You will be paying for ducting in either case, so the maid price difference is the geo unit, piping and some fill materials.

Geo will always out do an ASHP, even with the high SEER numbers on some units. No backup heat needed, although putting in the elements is low cost and a very good idea in case of a failure.

Read my geo posting: https://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/rural-living/74680-geothermal-heat-pump-project.html

Paul
 
  
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#8  
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MGH PA

Silver Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2010
Messages
232
Location
Northcentral, PA
Tractor
2005 Gravely 148Z 48" ZTR
Dropped the first load of lumber off at a local mill to have our flooring made. No stickers as we neglected to load ours when we took down the piles at our house thinking the owner would have some. Turns out he wasn't home, so excuse the poor stacking. They will be moving this into their shop soon, so not too worried. This is all timber harvested off our land. White oak, with a little red mixed in. We will be doing 3,4, and 5" widths. Site finished. About 800bf here. Another 800 or so to go yet.

flooring.jpg
 
   #9  

wngsprd

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Apr 6, 2004
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Beaverdam, Virginia
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Kubota L3130 DT
Beautiful place, MGH. I'm sure your kids will love growing up there. (and nice Tundra!)

We've had a horizontal geo system for 21 years and really like it. We burn a wood stove, too.
 

EddieWalker

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May 26, 2003
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Tyler, Texas
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Several, all used and abused.
I'm looking forward to following your progress.
 
 
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