Pond Overflow - DIY Horizontal Drilling

   #1  

Argonne

Gold Member
Joined
May 21, 2005
Messages
276
Location
Paris, TX
Tractor
JD2210, Ford 4400, Case IH 685, Terramite T7, JD 6x4 M-Gator
I have a 1/2 acre stock pond. Three sides have tall earthen berms, the fourth side is a gradual slope up into the pasture.

There is no overflow drain, and when it overflows (and it has twice in the last year), it flows out a corner of the pasture side and creates an alluvial plain in a very inconvenient area of the pasture. I need to install an overflow drain 50 feet through one of the berms to prevent this.

Due to the slopes on the berms, trenching with the (my) backhoe is not an option. What I really need to do is find an economical way to drill horizontally through the berm, leaving behind a 3-6 inch pipe which will drain the pond when it crests.

My current hare-brained idea is to use PVC schedule 40 conduit (which is cheap) as a self drilling pipe. I would cut some teeth into a coupling and glue it to one end, and clamp an irrigation hose on the other end. I would pump pond water into the pipe, and between the water pressure and the coupling "bit", drive the pipe into the hillside. At the end of a length, I would glue on another length, move the water connection to the new end, and push another 10 feet. If this scheme works, I will have my drain for about 60 bucks worth of material.

The only thing that keeps me from going out and trying this right now, is that I don't have a clue how hard this pipe is going to be to push once I get 20-30 feet into the berm. I'm going to have my water pressure resisting advancement, and the friction of the pipe against the soil. Coupled with the fact that I will be standing in my own, newly created, alluvial plain, things could become untenable quickly unless this scheme will allow cutting through that berm like a knife through butter.

My soil is Crockett Loam, which is mainly clay, and homogeneous down to below 8 ft. As such, although these berms are constructed of the spoils from the pond dig (decades ago), I expect to encounter no rocks.

Anybody ever tried anything like this? Other comments?
 
   #2  

Stimw

Elite Member
Joined
May 6, 2005
Messages
2,582
Location
N. E. Florida
Can you use your tractor in some way to push the pipe forward?
Without some kind of assist I don't believe your plan will work.
I have washed down dozens of shallow wells using 2" PVC and can tell you that just using a water hose for water gets really squirrelie and when pressure builds the 2" PVC can come 10' back up the hole relieving pressure!
Even if you could use stakes and a come-along or rope might work better.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#4  
OP
Argonne

Argonne

Gold Member
Joined
May 21, 2005
Messages
276
Location
Paris, TX
Tractor
JD2210, Ford 4400, Case IH 685, Terramite T7, JD 6x4 M-Gator
Can you use your tractor in some way to push the pipe forward?

Yea, if I buy another 100 feet of irrigation hose I can drill from the outside of the berm and use serious power assist.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#5  
OP
Argonne

Argonne

Gold Member
Joined
May 21, 2005
Messages
276
Location
Paris, TX
Tractor
JD2210, Ford 4400, Case IH 685, Terramite T7, JD 6x4 M-Gator
   #6  

Pettrix

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
482
Location
High Desert Southwest
Use Galvanized culvert pipe for the drainage pipe. Larger pipe diameter is better. 12" would be my minimum. Maybe 16-24 inch might be needed (depends on water amount)

Out here stock pond earthen berms are mosquito and disease havens since the water stagnates and cows poop and pee in the water they drink. Domestic cows are pretty stupid since they are bred for meat and not for intelligence (slow and dumb)
 
   #7  

Xfaxman

Super Star Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2013
Messages
11,204
Location
Guthrie, OK
Tractor
Toolcat 5610 G Bobcat V417 TORO+Loader
I would be concerned that when completed, overflow water also will flow down the outside of the pipe, eroding the dirt.

Check out this option: Conventional Pond Piping System

siphonsys_img.jpg
 
   #8  

turnkey4099

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2002
Messages
4,031
Location
SE Wa
I wouldn't think you would need to bury the pipe all dthat deep. Hand digging wouild be possible. I have trenched up to 4' deep for 100s of feet thorugh the loam soil here in the Palouse. How to seal the piple in so no water seeps around it is a problem. t looks good
 

Pettrix

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
482
Location
High Desert Southwest
Rip-rap rock would be a good idea around the drainage pipe to prevent erosion. Maybe even some geo-textile behind the rock.

To be honest, this is getting into some minor engineering realm. Depending on the size, a stock tank pond is like a small dam. If those things breach or have a collapse, it's like a 100-year or even 500-year flood breaking loose. Anyone down stream can be seriously hurt or killed.

Out here I stay away from the earthen berm stock tanks during monsoon season. Those things were built by a 6-pack of beer and a tractor. Not exactly top-notch engineering. I've seen some fail and the amount of water they let down stream makes that wash flow like a 100-year flood event. Pretty scary and dangerous event.
 
 
Top