Preferred gas engines for 1 ton pickups

   #1  

flusher

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I've been getting advice in threads I've started in this forum ( and by reading other threads here) to check out gas engine powered 1T PUs for my needs (pull a 10K GN flatbed trailer, less than 5K miles per year). So far I've been looking at older 1999-02 one ton diesel-powered PUs.

People tell me that since my annual mileage is so low, gas powered one tons are a better bet (diesels have to be run frequently and hard, diesel repairs are more expensive, etc). And since my trailer load is not that great, the torque advantage of the diesel is not that important. And since my annual mileage is so low, the fuel mileage advantage of the diesel compared to the gasser is also not that important.

So, which gas engines should I consider? I'm completely open to suggestions for any brand of 1T PU.
 
   #2  

Diamondpilot

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The Ford 6.8L V-10 would be my first choice but in the years you mentioned the tranny is not as heavy built as the Torque Shift tranny that went in the gas trucks as 2005 models and later.

The only option for a GM is the 8.1 with a Allison or maybe a 454 but the 6.0 is a dog. The main issue with the 454 again is the tranny.

As for Dodge they made a 7.0L V-10 for a few years around that time. They are few and far between but a good engine. I would also consider a 360. The 5.7 Hemi sounds impressive but has no place in a truck so stay away. The main issue with any Dodge is the tranny if its a auto.

Chris
 
   #3  

carpenter383

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If initial cost isn't the main reason you're thinking gas, then I'd go with a diesel any day. You'd be happy you did on the first hill with the trailer behind your truck.
 
   #4  

powerstroke444e

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Find a older 7.3l truck or a older 5.9l truck with a stick as the auto is weak point of all the trucks 1999-2003 as these diesels had lowest number of issues and have old style turbos that can handle setting for weeks at a time.

If you find a dodge w/V10 and a stick it would be the fuel pig of choice for most power and highest fuel use.
 
   #5  

RobertN

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Family friend has a 3/4 ton Dodge with the V10; I think a 2000. It looks pretty much like my 2001.

Anyways, he has towed all over the place with that thing. He tows a 34' 5th wheel with triple slides. I know he is well over 12k, probably closer to 14k with that loaded 5th wheel. I would not pull it with the 3/4 ton...

But! That V10 pulls it really well. It is stock, including auto tranny.

They have been thinking about a newer truck, but she does not like the diesel(claims sound and smell), don't want a Hemi, and aren't that impressed with the other bigblock offereing by the Big-3.

I'm really surprised they dropped that V10. My understanding was for smog and fuel efficiency reasons.
 
   #6  

WH401

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What's your annual mileage? I only drive my 92' 3k - 5k a year and it doesn't have a problem with that. I have another family member with an 01' 2500 w/ a 24 valve 5.9 that only uses it for towing, and it might see 2k - 3k per year, and sits for a couple weeks at a time. The point I'm getting at is, sitting isn't going to hurt the diesel any, and like "Carpenter383" said, as soon as you hit the first hill your going to wish you had a diesel. Gas engines are adequate, but there's no comparison to a diesel when it comes to towing.

The argument of Dodge automatics being problematic is a farce as well. There's nothing wrong with the autos, and 95% of the failures come from inexperienced or flat out stupid users, which will cause any automatic to fail. Don't be scared to buy one, just take it for a test drive first. The automatic in my 92' has 171k on it, and it spent the first 55k of it's life towing a 6k - 7k travel trailer w/ the bed loaded with about 1.5k lbs of cargo. That particular model of transmission doesn't have a locking torque converter, which creates a lot of heat, and it's still works fine. But, IMO, if your looking for a truck that is going to be strictly for towing or working, than I would go with the manual, simply for the fact that you can control the truck better.

:cool:
 
   #7  

Diamondpilot

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Find a older 7.3l truck or a older 5.9l truck with a stick as the auto is weak point of all the trucks 1999-2003 as these diesels had lowest number of issues and have old style turbos that can handle setting for weeks at a time.
We went through this with him. Living in Cali he is worried they will require DPF systems on diesel in a few years. I think he has a worry. They all but outlawed older diesel ag and construction equipment with all the mandates put on them and there is a movement to go after trucks and semis next.

Chris
 
   #8  

ultrarunner

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We went through this with him. Living in Cali he is worried they will require DPF systems on diesel in a few years. I think he has a worry. They all but outlawed older diesel ag and construction equipment with all the mandates put on them and there is a movement to go after trucks and semis next.

Chris

Many agree... the writing is on the wall when it comes to Diesels in CA... at least older ones.

Media ran several stories last week since the Port of Oakland now requires a "Green" certification for truckers to enter the port... basically, you are out of a job if your rig isn't powered by one of the new diesels...
 
   #9  

Dmace

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For your needs and model year requirements, I would go with a GM V8 8.1l. The Dodge 1-ton up to 2002 model year (old style) only came in dual rear wheel which you are probably not looking for. The Ford has a decent engine but there were still many problems with it (like spitting spark plugs out of the head), it gets horrible gas mileage and the tranny is made of glass.

I would also consider a 360. The 5.7 Hemi sounds impressive but has no place in a truck so stay away.
So you would consider the 360 that made 245hp/333lb.ft over the completely new and now very well proven 345 HEMI that makes 345hp/375lb.ft. :rolleyes: I don't know what you have against the HEMI but I highly doubt you ever even owned one, I have never heard anyone complain about that engine except for fuel mileage. Sure it uses fuel (17hwy/14city/11 towing max capacity - my real world numbers) but makes more power at any RPM per cu. in. then any other gasoline engine ever made.

The HEMI wasn't available in the 2500/3500 until 2003. It actually makes about the same power as the GM 8.1l but gets much better fuel mileage. The auto tranny behind the HEMI also has been mostly unchanged since 2003 and has been very proven as well. People like to remember the old Dodge tranny's of the early 90's that had problems and think they are still problematic but the new tranny started in 2003 has proven to be very stout and very reliable. I wouldn't hesitate one second to get a 1-ton with the HEMI and 5-speed auto but you stated you only wanted up to 2002 model year.
 

Duffster

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People tell me that since my annual mileage is so low, gas powered one tons are a better bet (diesels have to be run frequently and hard,

I have read that on here many, many times. Anyone that claims that is so full of it or just plain doesn't know what they are talking about.

We have diesel machinery that sits for 10-11 months out of the year.


And since my trailer load is not that great, the torque advantage of the diesel is not that important. And since my annual mileage is so low, the fuel mileage advantage of the diesel compared to the gasser is also not that important.

IMO a diesel will sit long periods far better than a gas model.

But I am sure whatever you decide on will do you well, good luck with your purchase.
 
 
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