Premix vs gas station 2 stroke

daman1

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May 7, 2010
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329
Location
Bad Axe,MI
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Massey Ferguson GC1723E TLB
We have 90 Rec also I just run it without nothing stays good for a looong time
 

Sberry

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Jan 8, 2007
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615
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Brethren, MI
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Mostly green
I did that but the cost went up and I dont notice any difference in how it all works vs 89.
 

SylvainG

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Jan 30, 2021
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South West, Qc
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Kioti LK30
Where I'm from, Super has no ethanol and that's what I put in my small engines.
 

ning

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Mar 30, 2017
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Northern California
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Branson 3520h, and some ancient "craftsman" lawn tractor thingy
Hi-test / high-octane gas won't help your lawn equipment one iota unless you've got some gear I've never heard of that runs a really high compression - many small engines run 6:1-8:1 compression which is way below the "needs high octane" level.

The only thing it'll do for you is reduce power output, because there's slightly less energy content in the fuel compared to a similar lower octane fuel, and using it as your storage fuel makes zero sense whatsoever.
 

SylvainG

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Jan 30, 2021
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South West, Qc
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Kioti LK30
Why does it makes zero sense? Isn't it the ethanol that clogs carbs when getting old?
 

MossRoad

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Aug 31, 2001
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South Bend, Indiana (near)
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Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
Why does it makes zero sense? Isn't it the ethanol that clogs carbs when getting old?
No. Ethanol doesn't clog carbs. Dirt clogs carbs. Ethanol can dissolve old o-rings, fuel lines, and such, however, most things manufactured since the mid 80's that still have carburetors are made with components that won't be affected by ethanol.

The main concern people have is fearing that ethanol will absorb water when stored, leading to problems. However, I find that a non-issue IF you follow your manufacturers recommendations on fuel and fuel storage. Been using 87 octane e10 since the mid 80's and never once have I had a fuel issue due to ethanol.

Think about it. I started driving in the 70's. Had to deal with frozen fuel lines at least once or twice a winter. Had to remember to add HEET to the gas tank regularly. Rebuilt carbs every 75-100,000 miles. And that's on cars that were frequently used. Leave a lawn mower or outboard motor with fuel in it and you were 50-50 as to if the carb was gonna get gummed up from fuel residue. Since the 80's when I started using 87 octane e10 fuel, I've never had a frozen fuel line. Never had to use HEET. Never had to rebuild another carb.

I'm convinced people that report ethanol related fuel problems in equipment manufactured after 1985 do not follow their factory recommended recommendations when it comes to fuel. They leave equipment sit with partial tanks in environments with widely changing temperatures, in storage containers that do not seal well, etc...

Get a couple gas cans, rotate them out into your automobile if it's been a few months. Only mix a gallon of 2-stroke fuel at a time if you're not going to be using it in a few months, etc...

Good luck with your particular equipment. Follow those manufacturer recommendations and you won't have any issues. ;)
 

ericm979

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Nov 25, 2016
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Location
Santa Cruz Mountains, Ca
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Branson 3725H
I get a 5 gallon container with 91 octane for the saws and other two stroke equipment and a couple of 87 for the four stroke stuff. Stihl and many other 2 stroke manufacturers recommend 89 octane. Since we have blender pumps here I can assume that the first gallon or two will whatever was pumped last, probably 87. Getting 91 means my 5 gallon can has at least 89 octane in it.

Air cooled two strokes can detonate pretty easily if they go lean or get hot, and that detonation often leads to seizure. Using high octane helps prevent that.
 

ning

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Mar 30, 2017
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Northern California
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Branson 3520h, and some ancient "craftsman" lawn tractor thingy
Why does it makes zero sense? Isn't it the ethanol that clogs carbs when getting old?
My point is that the octane raiting of high-octane gas vs similar but lower octane gas doesn't make a difference in storage.

If you're looking for non-ethanol fuel and it only comes in higher octane, then that may be the right stuff for you, but it's because the pertinent information is "non-ethanol", not "hi-test" or "high-octane".
 
 
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