Rivet setting on a sickle bar mower

   #11  

Gordon Gould

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I have the same mower and have always used a piece of steel plate as a back up and a ball peen hammer. Every season I replace a couple teeth guides and/or sections and have never had rivets break. I hammer them flat.

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gg
 
   #12  

fishheadbob

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Look at the pics in the link in post #2. The JD rivet tool in pic 3 was a definite winner for me; I always heard them called a rivet vise. Those tools had 2 working ends. One would knock out the old rivet if it was sheared off but still partly in place like a punch might, the other end would tighten the rivet down as flush and rounded as you wanted. No hammering or removing the bar to work on it. All that was needed was a box end wrench to tighten down the tool to do its' thing. You could replace a section or guard in the field in maybe a minute. I know mine wasn't a JD, there are a lot of companies producing those things, but my they sure have gotten pricey since I bought mine decades ago.
 
   #13  

Gordon Gould

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Those tools are sure nice. I was wondering if you are using rivets to connect your bar to the impeller bracket and they are the ones breaking. My mower uses bolts on the section bar. If I remember right the bar has threaded holes to receive the bolts. The guide tooth bar uses heavy rivets with a meaty head on them. Hard place to get a picture way underneath. Maybe someone did some rework on yours ?????

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gg
 
   #14  

flusher

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I use nuts and bolts to repair my Massey Ferguson 31 sicklebar mower. Tractor Supply has them.

Sicklebar sections.JPG

Grain farmers use them to repair the long sicklebars on their combines. Rivets are a thing of the past.

Good luck
 
   #15  

rankrank1

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I myself like the little special bolts over rivets as well. That said I have not been around a double acting sickle cutter like yours either as of all mine have been single acting with traditional rock guards. I can see where rivets just might have some advantages where clearances are tight on a double action unit.

When I was a kid I watched my uncle do many and while he had the fancy tool that uses a wrench he would only use that when he was doing a section replacement when the bar was still in the combine or hay cutter. When the bar was out he always used a hammer and big chunk of scrap steel as an improvised anvil as he much preferred that over the tool. He would use the backside of a big vise as an improvised anvil as well when a workbench was an option when the repairs happened at home instead of a far away field. My uncle always said the key to setting rivets was to make sure the very first hammer blow was a real big one. This would insure the rivet shaft was swelled down in there and fill all the imperfections within the hole. A bunch of little ticky tack light hammer blows that simply mashed the very end of the rivet over and the rivot will be loose in no time and shear.
 
   #16  

flusher

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I myself like the little special bolts over rivets as well. That said I have not been around a double acting sickle cutter like yours either as of all mine have been single acting with traditional rock guards. I can see where rivets just might have some advantages where clearances are tight on a double action unit.

When I was a kid I watched my uncle do many and while he had the fancy tool that uses a wrench he would only use that when he was doing a section replacement when the bar was still in the combine or hay cutter. When the bar was out he always used a hammer and big chunk of scrap steel as an improvised anvil as he much preferred that over the tool. He would use the backside of a big vise as an improvised anvil as well when a workbench was an option when the repairs happened at home instead of a far away field. My uncle always said the key to setting rivets was to make sure the very first hammer blow was a real big one. This would insure the rivet shaft was swelled down in there and fill all the imperfections within the hole. A bunch of little ticky tack light hammer blows that simply mashed the very end of the rivet over and the rivot will be loose in no time and shear.

When I was in grade school nearly 70 years ago my family would visit my grandparents in central Wisconsin. My grandfather was a blacksmith. I would watch him repair sicklebars using rivets. I've done it myself several times on my sicklebar mower before switching to nuts and bolts.
 
   #17  

LouNY

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I have set many rivets using a hammer,
as was mentioned you can't be gentle with the first hits as they need to swell and fill the holes.
Looking at the picture you have posted I am wondering if the assemble is set up correctly.
In the picture it almost looks like the guard to knife is backwards, it looks like the bevel of the knifes and guards are not in shear,
but backwards it may just be the picture.
But losing the end sections seems to imply a strain on those only.
 

DogT

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I'm re-sectioning and replacing the double guards on my 7' HN451 after 5+ years. I've always just used a rounding hammer, I think it's about a 2 pounder. One side is rounded, the other is flat. I use the flat end. I also happen to have a 225 lb horseshoer's anvil so I have something to work against. Since I'm replacing all my secctions, I bought a 7/8x4" grade 8 bolt that I'm going to stick in the anvil, it's got a square hole for tools and the 7/8 fits nicely. I'll drill a indent in the bolt head to accept the rivet head. Personally I've never had any experience with the bolts, but I couldn't expect they would last as good as a good rivet job. I don't worry about the top, it flattens out nicely with the 2 lb hammer and fills the hole, making the section really tight. I'm also going to try to use another smaller bolt with a similar dimple in it for the top, but I'm not holding my breath if it doesn't work very good. My trouble is getting the rivets out where there's a double bar on both sides of the section, near the drive side. I'll have to drill them out, they don't seem to want to punch out.

Even just a railroad plate would be good enough to work against. However hammering between those raised areas would require one of those tools, I've never used one.

Oh, I see this is from last year.
 
 
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