Rotary Cutter / Bush Hog Considerations for Compact Tractors

  
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#41  
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jeff9366

jeff9366

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Kubota Tractor Loader L3560 HST+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3,700 pounds bare tractor; 5,400 pounds operating weight ~~~~~~~~ 37 horsepower

PTO Link - Anyone using it?​


There does not seem to be enough demand from new-to-tractor owners for aftermarket PTO Quick Connect suppliers remain viable over the mid to long term. The able experienced don't need them.

New PTO powered implements, connecting to new tractor PTO splines are always difficult. Once implement and tractor PTO parts are somewhat worn in, mating becomes easier.

Clean mating parts, lubrication and technique are the keys.

Most here like Eureka Fluid Film as PTO lube. I prefer wax chain lube in an aerosol can.

Grease is too thick.

WD-40 burns off. Shaft goes on "OK" but can be difficult to remove when hot.

Connect the implement to the tractor using two Lower Link pins and one Top Link pin. Lift implement hydraulically until implement PTO shaft and tractor PTO spines are perfectly level, one with the other.

Turn tractor engine off, so tractor PTO splines can be rotated by hand.
Turn male splines by hand until they align with female shaft indents. Slide shaft onto tractor splines.
If the PTO shaft and tractor splines are not perfectly level it is almost impossible to slide shaft on to splines.

I am 73 years old. I connect PTO without too much difficulty.
 
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  • Thread Starter
#42  
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jeff9366

jeff9366

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Kubota Tractor Loader L3560 HST+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3,700 pounds bare tractor; 5,400 pounds operating weight ~~~~~~~~ 37 horsepower

PTO Quick Connect​


"Use a bungee cord or strap to support the shaft. It should connect and disconnect easily."

Better to mount your PTO implement on the Three Point Hitch, then raise the implement with TPH hydraulics until the PTO shaft is exactly level with the tractor PTO splines, so you can slide the PTO shaft straight on the tractor splines with the shaft and splines exactly aligned and level.

With a bungee, the shaft bobbles around and you still struggle to align PTO shaft and tractor splines.

Clean tractor male splines and clean PTO female fitting are also important. I use a Blaster solvent soak and a rag to clean about once per year. (I keep the rubber spline cover on when PTO is not in use and secure a feed bag around the female female fitting with a bungee to maintain both parts clean.)

Lube is important too. I use Boeshield liquid wax lube regularly for male splines and female fitting. (There are many brands of wax lube.)
WD40 is OK but it is not primarily a lube. WD40 evaporates quickly from warm or hot parts.

All this does nothing to help with sliding back the coupler or pushing the button.

Connection does become easier as parts wear in.

Age: 73
 

Hay Dude

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PTO Link - Anyone using it?​


There never seems to be enough demand from new-to-tractor owners for aftermarket suppliers to be viable over the mid to long term. The able experienced don't need them.

New PTO powered implements, connecting to new tractor PTO splines are always difficult. Once implement and tractor PTO parts are somewhat worn in, connection becomes easier.

Lubrication and technique are the keys.

Most here like Eureka Fluid Film as PTO lube. I prefer wax chain lube in an aerosol can.

Grease is too thick.

WD-40 burns off. Shaft goes on "OK" but can be difficult to remove when hot.



Connect all TPH pins. Lift implement until implement PTO shaft and tractor PTO spines are perfectly level, one with the other.

Turn tractor engine off, so tractor PTO splines can be turned by hand.
Turn male splines by hand until they align with female shaft indents. Slide shaft onto tractor splines.
If the PTO shaft and tractor splines are not perfectly level it is almost impossible to slide shaft on to splines.

I am 73 years old. If I can connect PTO without too much difficulty, you should too.
Largely depends on the weight or category of the PTO shaft. Try a big CAT 6 driveshaft on a Deere CX-15.
I’m in my 50’s and have no trouble, but in your 70’s I bet you’d be singing a different tune.
 

mo1

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How much tractor you need for a certain size cutter depends on what you want to cut and how fast you want to cut it. The only real hard and fast rule is that you can't run a physically too large mounted cutter, it either won't fit (category 2 cutter on a category 1 hitch) or be too heavy to safely handle.

I have run a lighter weight 5' unit (90s era Bush Hog Razorback) on a 23 PTO HP tractor and it was a good match. I ran at about 3 MPH as going much faster was too rough with the little front tires. Besides, cut quality really goes downhill over 4.5-5 MPH anyway. I wouldn't have wanted to use a 6' unit on that tractor mainly due to it being a little big and the "tail wagging the dog."

I currently run a Deere MX6 on a 5075E and it is a good fit for mowing ditches, field edges, and other areas smaller than a 20+ acre open field. The tractor doesn't really know the cutter is back there either in the power or lifting department, but it is a nice maneuverable setup as the cutter is about as wide as the tractor and not overly long.
 

LD1

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How much tractor you need for a certain size cutter depends on what you want to cut and how fast you want to cut it. The only real hard and fast rule is that you can't run a physically too large mounted cutter, it either won't fit (category 2 cutter on a category 1 hitch) or be too heavy to safely handle.

I have run a lighter weight 5' unit (90s era Bush Hog Razorback) on a 23 PTO HP tractor and it was a good match. I ran at about 3 MPH as going much faster was too rough with the little front tires. Besides, cut quality really goes downhill over 4.5-5 MPH anyway. I wouldn't have wanted to use a 6' unit on that tractor mainly due to it being a little big and the "tail wagging the dog."

I currently run a Deere MX6 on a 5075E and it is a good fit for mowing ditches, field edges, and other areas smaller than a 20+ acre open field. The tractor doesn't really know the cutter is back there either in the power or lifting department, but it is a nice maneuverable setup as the cutter is about as wide as the tractor and not overly long.
Certainly understandable why you don't notice a 6' cutter on a 5075. Plenty of tractor for alot bigger mowers. Can pull a 15' batwing if you wanted
 
  
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jeff9366

jeff9366

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Older tractor with rotary mower gouges dirt.​


Got a mid-1960's M-F 135 which shows lots of wear and tear.

My older JD rotary 5' mower either does not cut close enough or gouges the dirt on both sides when I mow. The rear support wheel is adjusted as low as it can go.

Is there a simple remedy or do I need to have the lifts repaired?



The inboard end of your TPH Top Link pins through operator choice of three or four paired, vertically stacked holes on the tractor.

I speculate Top Link is pinned into the highest or next-to-highest paired holes.

Try installing the inboard Top Link pin through a lower pair of holes.



CREDIT: "pmbutter" March 18, 2019

"There is a lot of contradictory information about which paired holes to use for the tractor/inboard end of the top link.

The top holes give the least elevation change of the tail wheel, but better maintains parallelism with the ground.

An earth turning plow ought to be in one of the upper holes, so it remains at a proper working angle, regardless of its depth.

The bottom holes provides the greatest elevation change of the "tail wheel" of my "implement", but it also the greatest angular change relative to the plane of the ground.

The bottom holes are best for something like a landscape rake where you might want to lift it up and out of the way, perhaps with a little more angle so trash drops off the tines."



RELEVENT VIDEO:


 
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  • Thread Starter
#47  
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jeff9366

jeff9366

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Kubota Tractor Loader L3560 HST+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3,700 pounds bare tractor; 5,400 pounds operating weight ~~~~~~~~ 37 horsepower
The rear support wheel is adjusted as low as it can go.

Extending your Top Link by screwing it out will lower the rear support wheel.

A properly adjusted Rotary Cutter will have the rear of the mower ~~ 2" ~~ or so higher than the front end of the cutter. The longer the grass being cut, the higher the rear gap should be to allow higher volume grass clippings to exhaust freely.

The tail wheel should contact the ground 99% of the time, to absorb transient shocks.
 

bnew17

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I bought a J Bar recently and I am really pleased with it. I got a 7ft with dual tail wheels, slip clutch.
 

workinonit

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One thing I would never buy is a large multi deck finish mower. They have belts and hundreds more moving parts to maintain and break and all those little wheels & tires. Belts to slip & smoke.
Buy a bush hog with NO belts, just PTO shafts and gear boxes. I see those multi deck field grass cutters selling for 1/2 their new price and they’re only 2-3 years old.
For smaller tractors (50HP) on frequently cut grass fields, I recommend a twin spindle, like a BH squealer or 8’ Deere MX, etc. The twin blades just seem like they do a nicer job.
For heavier woods work, like brush, I recommend a 5-6’ single spindle deck with a tough heavy duty gear box. You put less strain on your tractor PTO and can maneuver it between trees.
Just my 2 cents. I have a Frontier 20' 3 deck batwing. I've had it probably 10 years or so. Probably the most problematic part of these mowers are the deck tires. I had mine foam filled as soon as I bought it and have had no tire issues at all. Belts have not been an issue. I think it still has the original ones. I change blades every 2 years. 9 blades. I cut 7 acres of lawn type grass and I can say no other mower gives the quality cut that this FM gives.
 

Hay Dude

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Just my 2 cents. I have a Frontier 20' 3 deck batwing. I've had it probably 10 years or so. Probably the most problematic part of these mowers are the deck tires. I had mine foam filled as soon as I bought it and have had no tire issues at all. Belts have not been an issue. I think it still has the original ones. I change blades every 2 years. 9 blades. I cut 7 acres of lawn type grass and I can say no other mower gives the quality cut that this FM gives.
Hey that’s great!
But 7 acres per week? That would be considered very light, occasional use.
Try using is 3-4 times a week and cut 50-100 acres. I think you would have a different opinion.
I never questioned their quality of cut, btw.
 
 
 
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