Sit in bathtub/shower?

  
  • Thread Starter
#61  
OP
Sigarms

Sigarms

Super Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2005
Messages
8,055
Location
Mid north west in the state of N.C
Tractor
F3080
Will add this, if you ever think about getting a product like this, do it when you can actually enjoy it.

I honestly don't know how in the heck my father was taking showers at this time for numerous reasons. At least with this product he is able to bathe and shower MUCH more easier, even when the old tub had a shower seat in it.

Have noticed one thing bugging me, and that's "residue build up" at the bottom of the tub and around the seat (only two baths so far, and much more black residue in the tub when my dad gets out). Most likely from the jets and interior tubing (starting up "new" I'm guessing) which I hope will dissipate over time. As is, if this keeps happening, it's inexcusable IMO because I've litterally had to clean the tub both times it's been used, and I sincerely don't see how you could expect a senior citizen in their late 80's early 90's to keep cleaning the tub every time they use it.

That said, need to read the entire manual. Did mention to clean out the jets every couple of months, but not every time.
 
   #62  

Midniteoyl

Elite Member
Joined
May 20, 2013
Messages
4,310
Location
N. W. Indiana
Tractor
Kioti CK3510SE HST, Ford 3400, Gizmow ZTR, Simplicity 7016H
Will add this, if you ever think about getting a product like this, do it when you can actually enjoy it.

I honestly don't know how in the heck my father was taking showers at this time for numerous reasons. At least with this product he is able to bathe and shower MUCH more easier, even when the old tub had a shower seat in it.

Have noticed one thing bugging me, and that's "residue build up" at the bottom of the tub and around the seat (only two baths so far, and much more black residue in the tub when my dad gets out). Most likely from the jets and interior tubing (starting up "new" I'm guessing) which I hope will dissipate over time. As is, if this keeps happening, it's inexcusable IMO because I've litterally had to clean the tub both times it's been used, and I sincerely don't see how you could expect a senior citizen in their late 80's early 90's to keep cleaning the tub every time they use it.

That said, need to read the entire manual. Did mention to clean out the jets every couple of months, but not every time.
Could try filling it up with pure hot water and running it with some laundry detergent for awhile. See if that helps clear it up.
 
   #63  

Torvy

Platinum Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2021
Messages
999
Location
North East Texas
Tractor
Looking to purchase a Compact Tractor in 30-50 HP range.
Glad you found something that works. My dad is around the same age, also a Vet. My sisters visited them earlier this year and wanted to put something like that in place. The folks didn't want the bathroom torn up that long.

Wife and I had our bathroom redone a few years ago. Completely pulled the bathtub as we never used it. Got a teak chair we can keep in the shower or not. It is nice because wife and I can easily move the chair where it is best for us. Old shower had built in seat. Floor tile is slightly rough stone so it is not slippery. The home we are building will have the no lip shower and more shower heads. Probably use the same seat we have now.
 
   #64  

scaredychicken

Platinum Member
Joined
Jul 21, 2012
Messages
829
Location
Salmon Arm BC, Canada
Tractor
John Deere 160 (1988), Arctic Cat 400 ATV (2006), Kubota BX23S (2018),Jacobsen Super Chief 1450 (1969)
I'm glad that the solution is working

I just gotta say that when my wife and I bought the walk-in tub / shower 4 years ago, it was a NEED, not a GOAL. If your circumstances do not require such a measure, the walk in tub is likely not even on your radar, and you would probably say it is not a worthwhile expense - I get that, it was a difficult decision even for us. I certainly prefer a shower (mostly for time) but the tub is nice and relaxing when the body aches. We are both only in our 50s, but we have physical / mobility limits, and the tub allows us to live in our home - a regular tub / shower was no longer practical or safe. Regular bathing is important, and we can be independent in this, daily or every other day as needed. This independence is far more difficult for the aged, the infirmed, or those with mobility issues. I don't regret the purchase at all, but sure, I'd be happy with the standard bathroom, if it was still practical for us.

a different renovation to accommodate our needs, would have been at least double the cost. So there was that to consider also. cheers.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#65  
OP
Sigarms

Sigarms

Super Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2005
Messages
8,055
Location
Mid north west in the state of N.C
Tractor
F3080
4 other tidbits

1 - Since my dad weighs 87lbs soaking wet, will be looking at a waterproof seat cushion for his bony tush. Apparently I should of gotton one with the tub, but they are on backorder. Not certain if we want to wait.

2 - Since my dad enjoys a hot soaking tub, due to the type of tub it is with a door, you need to ensure you go to the bathroom before you use the tub, because if you "have to go" while your taking a bath, you're cutting your bath time since there is no hoping out of the tub and hoping back in.

3 - Because the water is being stored vertically for a sit in tub vs horizontally for standard tub, the gallon capacity is greatly increased with the walk in tub vs a standard tub. Luckily we have a 50 gallon water heater and the tub can be filled with very warm / hot water to capacity (you can tell it's stretching it to the end to fill though, and you won't be taking a hot shower at the same time someone is using the walk in tub). If you had a 40 gallon water heater, it may be pushing it. Water heater is original to home and still going strong. If it ever goes, may go to a tankless water heater.

4 - Just use the mechanical drain instead of the electronic option, it's less confusing for user IMO.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#66  
OP
Sigarms

Sigarms

Super Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2005
Messages
8,055
Location
Mid north west in the state of N.C
Tractor
F3080
The folks didn't want the bathroom torn up that long.
Primary reason why I didn't try this with some help on my end was the time it would take for me and more smarter help than myself to get it done. No way my father could wait that long without the use of the bathroom in the basement. Day and a half we could make work.

Install crew was two people, to rip out the old bath shower / shower walls, change the drain and shower side with new walk in tub, shower and walls ran two days, about a total of 34 labor hours.
 
   #67  

dmccarty

Super Star Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2000
Messages
12,119
Location
Triangle Of North Carolina
Tractor
JD 4700
Late to the discussion, but for others in this situation that can do the following: When we build our retirement home in '18, we put in a sunken shower floor in the master bath. ie, the shower floor is level with the rest of the bath floor. Nothing to step over, could roll a wheeel chair into the shower directly and transfer to chair or stand up. Grap rails in the future if needed. ...
When I designed our house, we put in a similar shower. We can roll a wheel chair into the shower if needed. Easy Peasey. We don't even have a shower door or curtain. It just works.

We do have a whirl pool tub but it has not been used in years. :eek: :ROFLMAO:

The limited hallways we have are over 3 feet wide and ALL doors are 36 inches or more. That helps with wheel chairs but also just moving stuff from to room when living in the house.

Regarding two story houses.

When I was designing The House, the builder and I went through dozens and dozens and dozens of design sketches and the cost of the designs. We wanted a two story house but the two story house was always more expensive. ALWAYS.

Stairs are costly and all but useless space. It is a very expensive hallway. Hallways are expensive and should be minimized. Our house has about 9ish feet of hallway space, including the entrance, and no hall way is more than three feet or so. Two story houses tend to have more hallways than a single story. If one is disciplined in the design, this can be minimized but it is tough to design, much less eliminate. Two story houses will tend to have more square footage than a single story house unless one compromises on room size. Stating the obvious, each level of a two story house has to fit together. What tends to happen is that one floor will not fit with the other so one will have to either increase or decrease square footage to make it work/fit. Most people won't compromise too much on room sizes, meaning make the rooms smaller, so the square footage increases instead.

The wall area of a house is going to be pretty close to the same irregardless of single or multi story family home. It has to be since people don't like to live in caves and want windows. In fact, the code requires two ways to get in and out of a bedroom, which almost always means a single door and window. The only way one can save on wall area is to have more rooms with out windows in the interior of the house which limits one to bathrooms, halls, stairs, and storage. Those rooms will not have much area, even in a bad design, to have much savings on wall area.

The other problem with two story homes, besides livability issues, is the build cost is higher. It cost more money to work on the exterior of the second story and the cost to get roofing materials up on the roof. The roof area of a two story house can/should be less than a single story house of the same square footage but that is offset with the added expense of working up higher. Yes, one will save on insulation in the roof but that insulation does not cost that much in the grand scheme of things.

We wanted a two story house but we could not afford it.

Later,
Dan
 
   #68  

Richard

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2000
Messages
4,399
Location
Knoxville, TN
Tractor
International 1066 Full sized JCB Loader/Backhoe and a John Deere 430 to mow with
Like I said, I was concerned about the door seal and if you use it as a rub, I imagine you have to completely drain it to get out (open the door). For us, a lawn chair worked just fine.

I agree with this. I've never seen one.... (my father is now 92 BUT has a 70 year old wife to dote over him)

Anyway, when I see those commercials and see someone get in the tub I'm thinking I can be DONE before that thing is even full..... then, they have to sit there while it drains?

No thank you. I'll go outside and use the hose first! (a bit of hyperbole but I have done that... the cold well water took my breath away but now, I have a hot and cold mixer outside.....although February would still pose an issue.)
 
   #69  

MossRoad

Epic Contributor
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Messages
48,979
Location
South Bend, Indiana (near)
Tractor
Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year
When I designed our house, we put in a similar shower. We can roll a wheel chair into the shower if needed. Easy Peasey. We don't even have a shower door or curtain. It just works.

We do have a whirl pool tub but it has not been used in years. :eek: :ROFLMAO:

The limited hallways we have are over 3 feet wide and ALL doors are 36 inches or more. That helps with wheel chairs but also just moving stuff from to room when living in the house.

Regarding two story houses.

When I was designing The House, the builder and I went through dozens and dozens and dozens of design sketches and the cost of the designs. We wanted a two story house but the two story house was always more expensive. ALWAYS.

Stairs are costly and all but useless space. It is a very expensive hallway. Hallways are expensive and should be minimized. Our house has about 9ish feet of hallway space, including the entrance, and no hall way is more than three feet or so. Two story houses tend to have more hallways than a single story. If one is disciplined in the design, this can be minimized but it is tough to design, much less eliminate. Two story houses will tend to have more square footage than a single story house unless one compromises on room size. Stating the obvious, each level of a two story house has to fit together. What tends to happen is that one floor will not fit with the other so one will have to either increase or decrease square footage to make it work/fit. Most people won't compromise too much on room sizes, meaning make the rooms smaller, so the square footage increases instead.

The wall area of a house is going to be pretty close to the same irregardless of single or multi story family home. It has to be since people don't like to live in caves and want windows. In fact, the code requires two ways to get in and out of a bedroom, which almost always means a single door and window. The only way one can save on wall area is to have more rooms with out windows in the interior of the house which limits one to bathrooms, halls, stairs, and storage. Those rooms will not have much area, even in a bad design, to have much savings on wall area.

The other problem with two story homes, besides livability issues, is the build cost is higher. It cost more money to work on the exterior of the second story and the cost to get roofing materials up on the roof. The roof area of a two story house can/should be less than a single story house of the same square footage but that is offset with the added expense of working up higher. Yes, one will save on insulation in the roof but that insulation does not cost that much in the grand scheme of things.

We wanted a two story house but we could not afford it.

Later,
Dan
Roofing materials are delivered to the roof free of charge around here.
 
  
  • Thread Starter
#70  
OP
Sigarms

Sigarms

Super Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2005
Messages
8,055
Location
Mid north west in the state of N.C
Tractor
F3080
I agree with this. I've never seen one.... (my father is now 92 BUT has a 70 year old wife to dote over him)

Anyway, when I see those commercials and see someone get in the tub I'm thinking I can be DONE before that thing is even full..... then, they have to sit there while it drains?

No thank you. I'll go outside and use the hose first! (a bit of hyperbole but I have done that... the cold well water took my breath away but now, I have a hot and cold mixer outside.....although February would still pose an issue.)

You feedback has been as much helpful as

"I think they cost about $15 total.
But the price has skyrocketed over the years and the chairs are now $15."

"I've also put the chair in the tub."

"What's wrong with the hand me down? Or do you want one of those "tanks" with doors?"

"I know 20 bucks for a resin chair was a lot less than a sit in tub/shower."

"Like I said, I was concerned about the door seal and if you use it as a rub, I imagine you have to completely drain it to get out (open the door). For us, a lawn chair worked just fine."

"Most guys don't need to sit in a special tub with 3-4 feet of water."

"Those installed sit tub showers are crazy expensive"

"I do not like sitting in a tub. I like showers. What I've had here for forty years still suits me just fine. When I come in from a days work on the property - I'm not just sweaty - I'm really dirty. Don't want to sit in a tub of dirty water."


You guys think I have my head that far up my butt that I don't understand that I was looking at a very expensive option to try and help my father?

What I do know is it's done, paid for in full, and at this time, I've learned even more about what my father could not do, because I always assumed he could take a shower with no problem because he NEVER once asked for help. He needed help in understanding the tub operation, which opened my eyes to exactly what he goes through when the bathroom door was closed.

If anyone is looking at getting one or installing one yourself due to your own family circumstances, I would recommend it. It may be cheaper to take em outside and hose them down, but I wouldn't go that route for a parent who has always been there for me ;)
 
 
Top