Starlink

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rekees4300

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This has the potential to finally provide true broadband internet service to rural areas. SpaceX's Satellite Internet Plans for Mid-2020 Launch in the US.

From article: "Expect speeds to reach up to 1 Gbps per user with a latency ranging between 25 to 35 milliseconds, on par with ground-based broadband services."

SpaceX's Satellite Internet Plans for Mid-2;) Launch in the US
 
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My son, who follows SpaceX/Tesla closely, has been telling me its coming. Sounds to good to be true, but not much stops Elon Musk.
I need it as I am on a very weak cellular hot spot that barely moves on weekends. Plus, they know that they are a last resort and charge accordingly.
 
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:thumbsup: Good 1st test with only few satellites up so far
 
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That's interesting information - especially for those of us beyond the reach of cable. I note from the article Musk can soon expect competition in the field which should drive down prices. Unfortunately, as seen from existing cable service, that does not seem to be the case. I suspect pricing will be business as usual - whatever the traffic will bear.
 
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Their has been a huge push (partly political) to provide choices for rural USA. This, along with 5G, and the wireless options (what I currently have) should provide some choices.

The low orbit satellite has been something that could be a big breakthrough to connect the world.
 
  
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rekees4300

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That's interesting information - especially for those of us beyond the reach of cable. I note from the article Musk can soon expect competition in the field which should drive down prices. Unfortunately, as seen from existing cable service, that does not seem to be the case. I suspect pricing will be business as usual - whatever the traffic will bear.

Competition is a good thing. Amazon and others are also getting into this field. We will know more in 2020 when Starlink announces prices.
 
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I remember my first cell phone. Looked like an old princess phone and was housed in a bag. We only had one provider and that was Sprint. Coverage was spotty but not bad and cost was on par with a land line. As soon as 2 or 3 competitors entered the fray prices went through the roof. Seemed like the only competition taking place was to see who could dupe the consumer out of the most money. I expect some illegal price fixing was going on and probably still is today.
 
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We have never had land line phone service out here. First phone - Motorola Bag Phone - ATT service. Not too expensive - limited minutes - fairly good reception. Then along came digital. Phones got tiny and service was spotty & expensive. Now I have this dam Apple iPhone XR. It will be long out of date by the time I figure it out. At least, I can make/receive phone calls on this "miracle of modern science".
 
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Starlink mid 2020 launch? I'll believe it when I see it considering Elon Musk's reputation for over selling and under delivering!
 
  
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Starlink mid 2020 launch? I'll believe it when I see it considering Elon Musk's reputation for over selling and under delivering!

Hopefully Starlink wont be priced like a Tesla. :) They have already launched 60 satellites (actions speak louder than words) so he's delivering. The article says "the plan is to provide a satellite link up terminal that customers can easily place in their homes". The key word is "in", inferring an ugly dish on the roof will not be necessary? :thumbsup:
 

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I can't wait to replace my expensive and not so reliable cellular hot spot.
 

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This has the potential to finally provide true broadband internet service to rural areas. SpaceX's Satellite Internet Plans for Mid-2020 Launch in the US.

From article: "Expect speeds to reach up to 1 Gbps per user with a latency ranging between 25 to 35 milliseconds, on par with ground-based broadband services."

SpaceX's Satellite Internet Plans for Mid-22 Launch in the US

I still have a bad tasted in my mouth from Hughes satellite internet with their 300MB bucket Fair Access Policy and 1,000ms latency and no internet every thunderstorm/wet snowfall either at my place or in Maryland.
 

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^^^ I had Starband for a while. Did all my software downloads and updates between midnight and 6AM during the unmetered period. Had to rig up a way to clear snow and ice off the dish.
 

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I've had HughesNet for eight years now. It's OK. Had Starband prior to that. In the winter I would appreciate a system with some type of indoor antennae. However - when you have only one choice.............

Things have improved on Hughes - - I have 25GB access and around 250 ms latency. Satellite will always have difficulty with weather.
 

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Current internet satellites are at over 25000km above the earth. Starlink is at 550km. Latency wont be an issue. They are trying to solve the bandwidth problem with numbers. We will see how that all goes in the next few years.

I am not certain on cloud/weather penetration improvements but that will always be some type issue with sky-based solutions.
 
  
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I still have a bad tasted in my mouth from Hughes satellite internet with their 300MB bucket Fair Access Policy and 1,000ms latency and no internet every thunderstorm/wet snowfall either at my place or in Maryland.

I've been down the Hughesnet road and give it one star. Comparing them to Starlink is apples to oranges. Starlink will be 40X faster and NO OUTDOOR DISH needed. If Starlink has reasonable pricing and good customer service, Hughesnet will become quickly obsolete.
 

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I've been down the Hughesnet road and give it one star. Comparing them to Starlink is apples to oranges. Starlink will be 40X faster and NO OUTDOOR DISH needed. If Starlink has reasonable pricing and good customer service, Hughesnet will become quickly obsolete.

Comcast and Centurylink could also be in serious jeopardy.
 
  
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rekees4300

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Comcast and Centurylink could also be in serious jeopardy.

Yes, Starlink has the potential to be a game-changer for many ISPs. They will be forced to adjust or disappear.
 

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We have never had land line phone service out here. First phone - Motorola Bag Phone - ATT service. Not too expensive - limited minutes - fairly good reception. Then along came digital. Phones got tiny and service was spotty & expensive. Now I have this dam Apple iPhone XR. It will be long out of date by the time I figure it out. At least, I can make/receive phone calls on this "miracle of modern science".
I also had a bag phone with a regional provider. I had better service with that in 1996 than I get now with my current employer provided "smart phone." I've gone back to a landline for my phone/internet and also back to planning my day around being home if I need to make a phone call... just like before my first cell phone almost 25 years ago.
 

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Might get interesting if this really is available next year... if the price is reasonable, then it will have the potential to really cut into business for existing services in rural areas especially.. stay tuned.
 

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Starlink mid 2020 launch? I'll believe it when I see it considering Elon Musk's reputation for over selling and under delivering!

I was thinking the same thing.

Yes, Starlink has the potential to be a game-changer for many ISPs. They will be forced to adjust or disappear.

We've heard this song before. Remember Google fiber? That kind of fizzled out.
If (big if) it works as advertised, is deployed nationwide and the price is reasonable it would be great, but I'm not holding my breath. Lower orbit=more satellites needed, and how many will be in range of where it's needed most (and has the fewest potential subscribers per square mile). I think we'll all be driving electric cars long before this is reality.
Call me a skeptic, but I've seen too much vaporware over the years .
 
  
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That's a valid point, we'll know more 1 year from now. Let's keep our fingers crossed to see if Elon can walk-the-walk as well as he talks-the-talk. :soapbox:
 
  
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Where are people getting the idea that service will be publicly available on any wide scale within a year?

From this article but "sufficient coverage" isn't explicit: SpaceX's Satellite Internet Plans for Mid-2020 Launch in the US

"On Tuesday, SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell mentioned the launch date for the US market, during a media roundtable, according to SpaceNews. The company's goal is to launch six to eight additional batches of satellites over the next months so that the broadband service has sufficient coverage."
 

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Before telegraph, electricity, telephone and cable TV, we didn't have poles lining every street in America with multiple wires running everywhere.
 
  
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Can稚 they just make them non reflective?

The article mentions that solution but results are unclear.

With Starlink satellites already marring astronomical observations at this very early stage, there's been an outcry from astronomers and a promise from SpaceX to work with scientists and remedy any of their concerns. An experimental "DarkSat" with a coating meant to make it less reflective was launched with one batch of Starlink satellites, but it's unclear if the approach can work.

The dark coating may cause the satellite to absorb more heat from the sun and ultimately malfunction. When Bassa attempted to observe the DarkSat in January, it didn't appear to be much fainter than its uncoated Starlink siblings. Other astrophotographers, including Thierry Legault, recorded similar observations in the video below. Bassa hopes to take another look soon to see what exactly is going on with the experimental satellite, but told me that weather has been uncooperative so far.
 

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The article mentions that solution but results are unclear.

Thanks for clarifying. I doubt there is any way Astronomers are going to stop these giants from progress. Bezos, Musk, and other corps may be in the running. Light pollution has ruined many aspects of astrophotography around cities. Now even those in rural areas wont be able to escape the mark of “progress.”

For those wondering, most of astrophotography uses long exposures. So any light source that stays in the frame ruins the final image. That’s why you see the lines across the screen. Those are repeated satellite passes over a few minutes time. To this end, even if they black them out there will be a faint black line across the image instead of a white one.
 
  
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Can't wait!

Ditto ... if Starlink is user-friendly, fast, unlimited data, reliable, and the price is reasonable it will be a game-changer for rural folks. An indoor antenna will be icing on the cake. :cake:
 

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Been keeping my eye on it. Lots of property I have has no connectivity options at all, well at least for the type of work I do.
 
  
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Musk has always impressed me. He has not succeeded in everything yet he has not let failure derail him. The first time I saw Spacex land a rocket booster on a barge floating in the ocean, I knew they had it going on. I don’t doubt that Starlink will be successful in time.
 

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The plan is for 40,000 Starlink satellites. Since Sputnik, humans have launched 9,000 satellites. 5,000 are still in orbit, 2,000 are still operating. While I appreciate getting internet access to remote places, I have to think there is a better and cheaper way to do it. The satellites are visible with the naked eye and already are interfering with astronomers. Several of the Starlinks have stopped working and are already space junk. I personally don't want to see my beautiful night sky taken over by satellites that will be orbiting junk after a few years. Hope there is a better answer.

I am a fan of Musk, and SpaceX. Love how they land their rockets back on the launchpad. Makes a ton more sense than NASA's way of dropping them in the ocean. But launching 40,000 satellites for internet access may not be worth it in the long run.
 

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The plan is for 40,000 Starlink satellites. Since Sputnik, humans have launched 9,000 satellites. 5,000 are still in orbit, 2,000 are still operating. While I appreciate getting internet access to remote places, I have to think there is a better and cheaper way to do it. The satellites are visible with the naked eye and already are interfering with astronomers. Several of the Starlinks have stopped working and are already space junk. I personally don't want to see my beautiful night sky taken over by satellites that will be orbiting junk after a few years. Hope there is a better answer.

I am a fan of Musk, and SpaceX. Love how they land their rockets back on the launchpad. Makes a ton more sense than NASA's way of dropping them in the ocean. But launching 40,000 satellites for internet access may not be worth it in the long run.

This should be great for many areas of the country. While now they can launch 60 at each launch they are planning to launch 400 at a time with a larger rocket. I did not know about Elon Mush until I saw they could reuse their rockets. Now I am a fan of Elon Musk many talents.
 

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The plan is for 40,000 Starlink satellites. Since Sputnik, humans have launched 9,000 satellites. 5,000 are still in orbit, 2,000 are still operating. While I appreciate getting internet access to remote places, I have to think there is a better and cheaper way to do it. The satellites are visible with the naked eye and already are interfering with astronomers. Several of the Starlinks have stopped working and are already space junk. I personally don't want to see my beautiful night sky taken over by satellites that will be orbiting junk after a few years. Hope there is a better answer.

I am a fan of Musk, and SpaceX. Love how they land their rockets back on the launchpad. Makes a ton more sense than NASA's way of dropping them in the ocean. But launching 40,000 satellites for internet access may not be worth it in the long run.

Elon has tweeted a few days ago that the reflected sunlight problem has been solved. This twinkle comes from the side of the comsat with the phased array antennas that have to be pointed at the surface of the Earth during the entire orbit in order to establish and maintain a communication link with the ground. And the solar panels reflect sunlight in a mirror-like way (specular reflection). This reflected sunlight happens twice per orbit for about 5 minutes each when the comsat passes through the penumbra of the Earth's shadow.

Elon's engineers have come up with an easy fix for the first problem--a thin black foam sunshade that covers the entire side of the comsat with the antennas and that is highly transparent to microwaves in the 7-30 GHz range. And the reflection from the solar panels is mitigated by rotating the comsat slightly around the Z-axis of the satellite ( the axis perpendicular to the plane of the antennas and which points toward the center of the Earth) so that specularly reflected sunlight is directed away from the surface of the Earth.

I'm pretty sure that a few of the Starlink comsats launched last Wednesday have the black foam sunshade and that the comsat rotation maneuver will be tested soon. Elon has tweeted that all 60 of the comsats in the 9th launch will have the sunshades.
 

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Thin black film is not a cloaking device. It might make them less likely to reflect Sunlight, but it doesn't make them invisible or keep them from blocking views beyond them with telescopes. Or keep stuff from crashing into them. Or keep them from crashing into our barns/sheds/houses ....

He can't even keep his cars from crashing into other stuff.
 
  
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SpaceX CEO and founder Elon Musk has shared more details about when in 2020 we can expect the companyç—´ Starlink low-latency, high-bandwidth satellite internet service to actually be available to customers. He said on Twitter that a private beta for Starlink would begin in around three months, with a public beta to kick off roughly three months after that.

The initial beta test will apply to those located in å¡—igh latitudes, Musk added. To date, SpaceX has said that Starlink service will initially be made available to customers in Canada and in the northern United States in 2020, with additional service expansion to follow to other parts of the world throughout 2021. On Twitter in response to a question about whether Germany counts as å¡—igh latitude, Musk said that it does, indicating beta service at least may be available in more markets than the U.S. and Canada ahead of next year.


The article is confusing so we'll just have to wait and see what happens. It refers to "private beta", "public beta", and "initial beta". So what do those mean? I assumed "private beta" (3 months) means testing by SpaceX and/or other experts and "public beta" (6 months) means testing by John Q. Public and "initial beta" means the same as "private beta"? :confused2::confused3:
 
  
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This should be great for many areas of the country. While now they can launch 60 at each launch they are planning to launch 400 at a time with a larger rocket. I did not know about Elon Mush until I saw they could reuse their rockets. Now I am a fan of Elon Musk many talents.

The guy is a genius but hopefully a Starlink subscription will cost less than a Tesla. :)
 
  
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Sunday SpaceX plans to launch first Starlink satellites testing 'VisorSat' to block sun. A set of darkened shades that can be deployed to keep the sun from glinting off the bright parts of each satellite that threatens to interfere with the observations of astronomers and other scientists.

SpaceX to launch first Starlink satellites testing 'VisorSat' to block sun - CNET

It was a fast fix and hope it works out well. I know the Air Force is excited over Starlink to go live for some reason.
 

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That's always been the problem with HSI in rural areas, everyone wants it but no one wants to pay for it. You can bet this will be no different.
 

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That's always been the problem with HSI in rural areas, everyone wants it but no one wants to pay for it. You can bet this will be no different.

It will be different. Vastly so. One grouping of satellites offers basic coverage vastly exceeding that of the current infrastructure, which has yet to be fully deployed. < and probably never will be.
 

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Time will tell I guess. You would have thought someone putting that much money into a project would have a sense of how long it would take to make his money back. I don't suspect we will know how vastly different it is until it happens. If it's affected by weather like all other satellites then that may be a real problem for people that need a reliable connection. I'm a little biased since I install fiber for a living. As long as you can keep the idiots from cutting it it is as reliable as anything and lightning fast.
 
 
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